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Hi again,

 

 I am not getting this, I have been faffing around enlarging my images in photoshop, so that when I view the closed file it reads above 24MB, subsequently these images are enormous poster sized affairs, and they look great, but they are too big to upload. With some further reading I find it tells me me they must be above 24 but no bigger than 25 and then it says but do not make them massive like I have been doing.

 Now I ain't that tech smart. I cannot see in photoshop where it says the size of an open file I have tried allsorts but I appear to be shooting blind with this. I am converting my images from RAW files which are roughly 15MB I think ( that is what it says anyways) but I cannot really tell the size of the image when it is converted to jpeg. It says on the tin between 1 and 5 mb depending upon the image are these sufficient as they are? Does anyone out there have a hassle free no nonsense response for me that I can understand? It would be most helpful thankyou.

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The maximum size isn't 25MB. Probably 250?

Anyway if your RAWs are 15MB you don't need to resize. Just export your jpegs at high quality (90 in LR, I don't know about PS, 10 or above perhaps?) and they will be fine.

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If you convert the tiff to 8 bit then when you save as jpeg photoshop should tell you the size.

 

I usually have the quality at 12, unless the file is too big in which case I use 11.

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In Photoshop, when your image is open the file size is at the bottom left of your screen.

You are confusing open image size with compressed closed image jpeg size.

 

Have you ever got a flat pack chest of draws from Ikea and built it without any reference to the instructions, only to discover it don't quite look right?

If you go through and thoroughly read everything on how to submit then many of your questions will be answered.

 

Yours Helpfully

Andy

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The image size doesn't change when you export to jpeg, it's the file size. If the camera is over about 8MP, it's big enough.

RAW file sizes are about the same number of MB as the pixel count in MP.

Edited by spacecadet

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as long as your images are UNDER the maximum of 200MB (uncompressed size) they will be fine. 

 

enlarging my images in photoshop, so that when I view the closed file it reads above 24MB

Are you upscaling them? or am i completely interpreting this statement wrong? 

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24MB is the size in memory not the file size on disk.  It's just a bad way of saying that your 8 bit RGB file must be at least 8.4 mega pixels as each pixel takes 3 bytes of memory.

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Forget about the MB size.  If your image is 9 megapixel or larger (I generally use 3604 pixels long edge as a guide) then you're fine.

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Welcome Babs:

 

If you want to keep uploading to Alamy, you are going to have to acquire some tech skills. It's inescapable.

 

As mentioned, at the bottom left of your Photoshop window you will first see a percentage amount. That is what percentage of the size of the photo you are seeing on your screen.  Next to it are 2 numbers. The first is the actual uncompressed file size of your image as you work. This is before you have saved it to any file type or made any crops.  The second is the original uncompressed file size. At the beginning both numbers will be the same. But if you crop your image down, say to remove a lamppost or something from the edge, the first number will go down, but the second number will stay the same. The first number is the one Alamy is interested in. It can't go below 24mb.

 

I shoot in RAW and edit in RAW.  My camera is 18 mp, so my images are always 51.3mb uncompressed (before I have converted them to jpgs). This is the file size Alamy is talking about, not the jpg, which is compressed down when saving and can vary as mentioned depending on the detail in your photo.

 

You should head over to Adobe and start watching the video tutorials on Photoshop from the beginning.  Also on Youtube there are tons.

 

And study the tech for your camera as well. Photography is a tech world now, and your camera is a lot more than setting f-stop and shutter speed.

 

So what file type do you shoot in?

 

RAW

JPG

RAW + JPG

 

Every photographer is different and has a different workflow.

 

If you shoot in JPG then you need to save your JPG as a TIFF file before you start to edit the photo.  You work on the TIFF, not the JPG.  When you finally have your final product the way you like, save the final result as both the TIFF and the JPG you want to upload to Alamy, making sure the number on the left is 24mb or higher.

 

If you shoot in RAW, then you do your editing on the RAW file (either in Photoshop or Adobe Camera Raw)  and then save as the final JPG. Never alter your original images.

 

Hope this is helpful. Just take the time to understand Photoshop first. It has a large learning curve, but if you start with the basics and move forward, you will master it enough to edit your photos properly.

 

Jill

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Thanks guys, I passed quality control no problem so all is good. My camera is 12 megapixel so just went with the save it and see option, thanks again.

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I nearly always shoot in RAW, Jill, thanks again for the advice, I will get around to some extra tutorials. I am currently working on some books so got a lot to go at with InDesign, but I will definitely get around to it. 

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Ignore the file size on disk. Image size counts, as already stated.

 

Colour mode = RGB (red, green, blue). Following applies regarding image sizes, as apposed to file sizes (close approximation):

 

6MP camera delivers an RGB image file consisting of: 6MB red + 6MB green + 6MB blue = 18MB image size <--- this number is what counts, NOT the file size on disk. Will fail on image size since smaller than 24MB.

 

8MP camera delivers an RGB image file consisting of: 8MB red + 8MB green + 8MB blue = 24MB (on the edge, may just fail on image size if slightly less than 24MB)

 

10MP camera delivers an RGB image file consisting of: 10MB red + 10MB green + 10MB blue = 30MB (OK)

 

20MP camera delivers an RGB image file consisting of: 20MB red + 20MB green + 20MB blue = 60MB (OK)

 

etc

 

Therefore, if your camera has 8 (better 9) Megapixels or larger, you don't need to upsize any images (unless you crop them too much, then they may be too small).

 

 

Put simple:

 

IF camera pixels 9MP or larger, THEN upload JPEG files without enlarging (ignore file size on disk).

Edited by Mark
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I struggled with that when I joined as well - it is probably the most confusing thing of all when you join Alamy.

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I've not used it, but there is an Alamy size check program that you can download:

 

http://www.braeside.plus.com/photography/alamy/alamy.html

 

In my last submission, I had a file that I had somehow managed to downsize to 17 MB, and it was rejected. So think I'll try this size-checker myself.

 

Update: I just downloaded this little program and gave it a go. Works like a charm. Why did I wait so long?

Edited by John Mitchell

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Install and use the program "Alamy SizeCheck" to be sure your JPEG files fulfill all specs before uploading.

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Hi all,

 

How on earth am I suppose to get 17mb or more uncompressed JPG from 20mpx camera?(according to Alamy PDF guidelines) Can someone enlight me? My uncropped, uncompressed files ranging from anything between 6mp up to 10.5mb :(

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arterra is right, I often shoot wide open, hence image data is a lot smaller, what's the point of guidance like that? 

 

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1) Open image in Photoshop

2) Make sure it is in 8-bit (if not change by going to Image --> Mode --> 8-bit)

3) At the same time press Ctrl Alt and I (three keys at the same time) - a box pops up - at the top it will state what your uncompressed image size is. It needs to be more than 17 M (mb) to be acceptable by Alamy.

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Ignore the file size on disk. Image size counts, as already stated.

 

Colour mode = RGB (red, green, blue). Following applies regarding image sizes, as apposed to file sizes (close approximation):

 

6MP camera delivers an RGB image file consisting of: 6MB red + 6MB green + 6MB blue = 18MB image size <--- this number is what counts, NOT the file size on disk. Will fail on image size since smaller than 24MB.

 

8MP camera delivers an RGB image file consisting of: 8MB red + 8MB green + 8MB blue = 24MB (on the edge, may just fail on image size if slightly less than 24MB)

 

10MP camera delivers an RGB image file consisting of: 10MB red + 10MB green + 10MB blue = 30MB (OK)

 

20MP camera delivers an RGB image file consisting of: 20MB red + 20MB green + 20MB blue = 60MB (OK)

 

etc

 

Therefore, if your camera has 8 (better 9) Megapixels or larger, you don't need to upsize any images (unless you crop them too much, then they may be too small).

 

 

Put simple:

 

IF camera pixels 9MP or larger, THEN upload JPEG files without enlarging (ignore file size on disk).

 

That explains things pretty well, but there are a couple of errors, I think. The most important one is that you should be able to submit images direct from a camera with a  6M pixels sensor.

 

The most reliable way, I think, is to look at the properties of the image file in Windows or in a software application (I don't now about Macs). Multiply the width in pixels of the image by the height in pixels of the image. If the number you get is greater than or equal to 6,000,000 then the image will be large enough. 

 

[ignore this second one if you struggle with bits, bytes, file sizes, compression etc. or you will be confused even more! A sensor 1000 x 1000 pixels would have a million pixels. Because of the way that M bytes are defined it needs slightly less than 1Mbyte of data to store 1 million bytes at 1 byte per pixel. The minimum acceptable image size is 6M Pixels. Each pixel needs 3 bytes to store red, green and blue. So you need 18 million bytes to store a 6 M pixel image. But 18 million bytes is actually 17.2 Mbytes. Hence the 17Mb figure that is sometimes quoted.]

Edited by Keith Douglas

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Ignore the file size on disk. Image size counts, as already stated.

 

Colour mode = RGB (red, green, blue). Following applies regarding image sizes, as apposed to file sizes (close approximation):

 

6MP camera delivers an RGB image file consisting of: 6MB red + 6MB green + 6MB blue = 18MB image size <--- this number is what counts, NOT the file size on disk. Will fail on image size since smaller than 24MB.

No, it won't. The minimum size has been reduced to 17MB.

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Hi all,

 

How on earth am I suppose to get 17mb or more uncompressed JPG from 20mpx camera?(according to Alamy PDF guidelines) Can someone enlight me? My uncropped, uncompressed files ranging from anything between 6mp up to 10.5mb :(

 

A 20 MP camera should easily produce images in the size required by alamy.  When you mention your files are 6-10.5 MB, this is likely the compressed file size, not the uncompressed size.

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