Jump to content
John Morrison

The death of photography?

Recommended Posts

Beat me to it by 12 minutes - just came here to flag up the same article.

Best use I've found for a smartphone was when I licenced a photo of mine.

 

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I still think that a magazine publisher will still not go himself out with the smartphone to take a image he needs for a magazine. Time is money so stockphotos will be still bought.

 

My thinking..... correct me when i am wrong.

 

 

Mirco

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting, I find that I'm actually MORE likely to remember something or someone if I photograph the subject. On a good day, I can run through just about every image I've taken in my head. But then I don't own a smartphone, and the thought of taking a "selfie" terrifies me at this point. 

Edited by John Mitchell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately my new A55 has an articulated screen. Very tempting. Usually it's just me and 'er indoors in our posh kit at ladies' nights, but who knows....?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the thought of taking a "selfie" terrifies me at this point. 

Me too. I don't have a mirror in the house. Even the picture in my passport is of Harold Shipman...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that the last paragraph in that piece is the most pertinent and in a way contradicts what he (Antonio Olmos) said in the first paragraph.

 

Para1: "There have never been so many photographs taken, but photography is dying"

Last para: "I'll survive in this profession because I have skills...just because you've got an Instagram app on your phone you aren't a great photographer."

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Who was it that said, the opposite of a great truth is also true? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"He argues that in the 1850s the rise of photography made many painters, who had previously made nice livings from painting family portraits, redundant. Now it's the turn of professional photographers to join the scrap heap."

 

Photography liberated painting, so by the twentieth century photography was not even considered to be a creative medium, let alone an art form.  And with some justification.

 

Now photography is being liberated.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was at a news conference this evening.  There were two people with still cameras there - myself, and a photojournalist from the Village Voice.  Everyone else was a journalist or shooting video.  The journalists were taking pics with their iPhones.  It's very sad.

Edited by Ed Endicott

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that the last paragraph in that piece is the most pertinent and in a way contradicts what he (Antonio Olmos) said in the first paragraph.

 

Para1: "There have never been so many photographs taken, but photography is dying"

Last para: "I'll survive in this profession because I have skills...just because you've got an Instagram app on your phone you aren't a great photographer."

 

Or another way to put it: "the easier the technology becomes, the more poor photographers are exposed" :) ….. However, the same applies to great photographers.

 

Surely the technology is secondary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There were four pictures used to illustrate the article - from Reuters, Alamy and Getty. I'm pretty sure non of them was taken on a phone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I could buy the best camera/lens combo in the world. I could buy the new Xperia Z1 or iPhone. It's still not going to make better shots happen. Because I walk about with my camera a lot on my lunch break I actually do get the odd person who feels the need to parade their iPhone in front of my eyes to let me see their latest shot of the river I walk a long. "Oh look, if I zoom, you can see the Heron" Aye but if I zoom I can see what it's eating, and the expression on the face of it's meal. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"He argues that in the 1850s the rise of photography made many painters, who had previously made nice livings from painting family portraits, redundant. Now it's the turn of professional photographers to join the scrap heap."

 

Photography liberated painting, so by the twentieth century photography was not even considered to be a creative medium, let alone an art form.  And with some justification.

 

Now photography is being liberated.

 

Very profound..... 

 

I originally trained as an illustrator and I know for sure the average Joe Blog cannot pickup a paint brush and paint a work of art..... no matter how easy it is to get a hold of a brush / paint. It does mean more people with the right skills will have a chance to develop them though.

 

Also, if everyone submitted paintings to galleries, not just artists, you will find the occasional gem but more often than not, you will be reminded how good the artist/professional photographer is. 

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.