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Back in the 80's I shot film with my Canon AE-1. Loved it. Loved black and white as nothing beats it for mood, and cheap to shoot and develop. The down side to doing your own, chemicals only last so long, so once mixed you better use them.  And think how terrible film is for the environment. With digital, no chemicals heading for the landfill.

 

I've heard this from a few people but I'm not sure that's the case....I mean how much arsenic, coke, etc. are used to make the wiring of digital cameras?  It also used to be that you'd buy a film camera and it lasted you for your entire career (i.e. Leica, Nikon) - these days we replace digital cameras every two or three years.

 

It's the same argument with electric cars - where does the electricity come from?  It comes from mined coal which burns at power plants and pollutes our lakes and streams with mercury.  Where do those batteries in those cars come from?  Lead and Sulphuric Acid.

 

I think it's six of one and half dozen of the other.

 

....sorry don't mean to hijack the thread

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A good point, Ed. Points, really.  But I am amazed at how sentimental people can get about metal, plastic, glass and chemicals.  :huh:

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Film  is undoubtedly far more tactile than digital, the use of film involves so many processes that involves human contact much more so than digital, film is also delightfully retro which makes it very special compared to DI; add the attribute that there is an excited wait for the results be it waiting for the return of your film/ processing the negatives or watching the appearance of a print in the developer there is no surprise that film has a faithful following. I know two/three "amateurs" who have shed all their DI kit in favour of film gear.

 

Many young people are also enjoying using film, already they are fed up with time in front of a screen and many schools' extra curricular darkroom clubs are well subscribed.

 

You could as many have said adopt the mind of a film shooter when shooting digital; I think that depends on you; some digital shooters use the mud on the wall principle others take a more considered approach Whatever approach you take is right for you but wrong for the next person; luckily the choice is yours.

 

Perhaps in the end you could try the tri-approach of:

 

Shoot for dough (use digital)

Shoot for show (use digital or film)

Shoot for self (use film)

 

For me I will stay put with digital photography.

 

Peter.

Edited by peterjones

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A good point, Ed. Points, really.  But I am amazed at how sentimental people can get about metal, plastic, glass and chemicals.  :huh:

 

On a slightly related point, I stopped shooting film because of my vegetarian/vegan beliefs.

 

(Gelatine, in case you were wondering).

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A good point, Ed. Points, really.  But I am amazed at how sentimental people can get about metal, plastic, glass and chemicals.  :huh:

 

On a slightly related point, I stopped shooting film because of my vegetarian/vegan beliefs.

 

(Gelatine, in case you were wondering).

 

Really? You stopped taking photographs, just like that? How long did it take you to find out about gelatin?

Or did you just stop when digital came along?

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A good point, Ed. Points, really.  But I am amazed at how sentimental people can get about metal, plastic, glass and chemicals.  :huh:

 

On a slightly related point, I stopped shooting film because of my vegetarian/vegan beliefs.

 

(Gelatine, in case you were wondering).

 

Really? You stopped taking photographs, just like that? How long did it take you to find out about gelatin?

Or did you just stop when digital came along?

 

 

They overlapped. Or rather, I restarted shooting film (and doing the dev) after I'd started digital and then realised that gelatine was involved and decided I'd rather not use film because of that. 

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I've been a lacto-vegetarian for a long, long time (>35 years) for ethical as well as health reasons but I don't go that far in terms of animal products. I doubt that pigs or whatever animal were used were actually killed for their gelatine - it's presumably just a by-product so ethically alright to use in my book. I avoid eating it of course - I just threw out my last 10 rolls of Velvia which I found in a cupboard forgotten - I had to forego the temptation to make a Velvia sandwich. 

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Not all photography has to be commercially optimized. Nor is it an either/or question. For me, shooting film (Tri-X) with a Leica MP and 35mm lens (both funded by alamy a few years ago) held easily in my palm, hearing that quiet "thunk" of the shutter, and the click of the winder is a joy. Or a roll of Velvia and a stroll in the blooming countryside, or exploring a candy-coloured American small-town centre. Just tried some Provia. Interesting pastel result to some street photos. As Sam Abell says, "compose and wait", as you say, "slow down". Watch observe, merge with your surroundings, then make (I mean "make" that shot…..see it developing, compose it, wait……wait….everything coming into alignment…make that photograph). Better still, I have started going out all day with one film loaded. One film, 36 chances, no second roll. Makes you stop and think even more. It works. My next book will be a collection of one-film mini-projects. Difficult to do with digital. It is so tempting to shoot just one more, or maybe ten just to be sure. No, that is too easy.

 

Love it. Bad for stock these days. Film=Flintlock,  Digital=Gatling gun. Difficult to use a gatling like a flintlock. Not the same feeling.

 

 

I meant PORTRA!

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I've been a lacto-vegetarian for a long, long time (>35 years) for ethical as well as health reasons but I don't go that far in terms of animal products. I doubt that pigs or whatever animal were used were actually killed for their gelatine - it's presumably just a by-product so ethically alright to use in my book. I avoid eating it of course - I just threw out my last 10 rolls of Velvia which I found in a cupboard forgotten - I had to forego the temptation to make a Velvia sandwich. 

 

Everyone has their own line they won't cross and there's no absolute right or wrong. 

 

I rationalise my iffy choices in lots of ways and inconsistently at that. 

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I still use film, when the weather is good and when I am somewhere nice. Then, I take my Pentax 6x7 (which must be 40 years old now) and a few rolls of Fuji Velvia with me. If conditions are right I will take shots (hand held) which are far superior to anything digital.

 

The pentax lenses are excellent and the camera can be held like a normal SLR due to the hand grip. It is also fascinating to see the looks on other peoples faces as they clear the way for you!

 

I am also lucky in having 2 good pro. labs in town which still develop E6 for a reasonable price.

 

If you are interested, take a look on my FAA site where I have a small gallery of medium format images! Also one dedicated to film captures.

 

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/2-david-davies.html

Edited by David Davies

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People may often wonder why I start a thread then let it run with little input from myself. Usually I start something when I have exhausted all research and usually don't have anything to input. I appreciate all the advice as always and can always count on the info on this forum due to the vast experience of many. As an update because I've been going on about it with my other half she sneakily bought me a Canon AE-1P with two rolls of colour film, 100 and 400 speeds, and two rolls of B&W of the same speeds so I can have a bash at it. 

 

Like she said, you may not like it, you might love it, but it's worth trying. I've learned a lot through digital, probably quicker than anything I could learn on film. Instant feedback and correction has saved me many times and in critical moments. 

 

I still would like to experience the tactile feedback you get with the mechanics of it all, the anticipation of the shots being processed and the excitement of opening the delivered prints. It won't replace my love for digital but sit side by side for those times where the need takes me. I'm looking forward to it. 

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Good luck with it. Be careful though, it's addictive!

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People may often wonder why I start a thread then let it run with little input from myself.

Unable to type because of the cholesterol overdose from the deep-fried Jaffa cakes, I bet.

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"...but I experiment more than when I was shooting film, and believe the instant feedback and failsafe exposure technologies of digital have had a positive effect on my creativity. I am certainly enjoying my photography more than ever."

 

Joe Cornish

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People may often wonder why I start a thread then let it run with little input from myself.

Unable to type because of the cholesterol overdose from the deep-fried Jaffa cakes, I bet.

 

 

Or high on Ilfosol.

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Ah, but he's only just got the kit. The joys of contact dermatitis are yet to come.

Just kidding, It's very rare and you can wear gloves, but gloves are for wimps.

What am I saying. I haven't made a b/w print since 1995 and my last b/w film was c41 printed on Ektamax. Who wants to make 72 6x4s?

Edited by spacecadet

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I still would like to experience the tactile feedback you get with the mechanics of it all, the anticipation of the shots being processed and the excitement of opening the delivered prints. It won't replace my love for digital but sit side by side for those times where the need takes me. I'm looking forward to it. 

 

It's great to do some "hands-on" tactile stuff, too. There'd be even more tactility if you did your own developing.

 

I still enjoy mounting my prints after having fiddled with them on a screen for hours for the same reason. 

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If your going to send your negs off to some lab to be developed & printed, I think you'll be very disappointed with what you get back. They can't see your vision..only you can make the picture look the way you want it. The Printing process is the most important aspect of doing black and white, you can make a crappy neg look amazing or an amazing neg look crappy. So as said before I too would recommenced joining an evening class where you'll meet like minded people, have fun & after some tinkering in the darkroom, have some lovely prints that'll be around for your great great grand kids to enjoy.

 

Parm

Edited by Bhandol

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I still would like to experience the tactile feedback you get with the mechanics of it all, the anticipation of the shots being processed and the excitement of opening the delivered prints. It won't replace my love for digital but sit side by side for those times where the need takes me. I'm looking forward to it. 

 

Are these going to be shots for stock? Or just fun with film? If for stock, and you won't be developing your own, you will also need to invest in a 35mm negative scanner. And then can do your PP in PS since you won't be doing your own darkroom work.

 

The darkroom is the fun part, although expensive and of course you have to have a room dedicated for it. Perhaps that is down the line for you once you get comfortable with film. 

 

If you are still shooting for stock, just get a contact sheet made, no individual prints and then pick from those that you want to upload from the negative. Also saves you from paying for prints of shots you don't like if just shooting for yourself.

 

Good luck and have fun shooting!  

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Hey Jill, 

 

Nope it's just for fun. Actually purely for my own little enjoyment. :)

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Fun, yes. Sometimes. I remember two special darkrooms I had, one in my first married apartment in Manhattan, the other in Saigon. The first was a converted closet opposite the bathroom, where I had the chemical trays on shelves, one over the other, instead of side by side. My wife and I used to joke that I had a secret door that led into the flat next door, where there was a second wife and two small children and only Portuguese was spoken. In Saigon I rented out a Vietnamese wedding photographer's tiny lab. Sometimes, when only the safe light was on, rats would move around the floor. Hey, in a war zone you get used to rats. 

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"...but I experiment more than when I was shooting film, and believe the instant feedback and failsafe exposure technologies of digital have had a positive effect on my creativity. I am certainly enjoying my photography more than ever."

 

Joe Cornish

In this house it would be +1 to that.

Chris E

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