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March 2022 - Favourite uploads.


cbimages
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Recently I came across this photo that I took in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, during the later 1980's. This handsome Mexican gentleman used to be something of a fixture around town. For a fee, he would pose for tourists (including me) with his basket, which he tried to sell at the same time. I never knew his name, but he was quite a good businessman. Hopefully he's still around.

 

Old black and white photograph of an elderly Mexican man selling baskets in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico Stock Photo

 

 

Edited by John Mitchell
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17 hours ago, gvallee said:

 

You're in my thoughts Carol. You're such a strong and inspiring woman! And I love your insects so much!

I was once in a village selling books to the owner of a bookshop. His father had just died a few days earlier and he was very upset. We were outside his bookshop by my car with the boot open when a pigeon landed on the boot right next to us. The owner said 'perhaps it's my Dad saying hello'. I thought it was very touching.

 

Thanks Gen, I'm a great believer in "signs", or whatever we want to call them. I've had too many things happen in my life not to take notice. Like when my dear Mum passed, a friend who she like and admired went into labour within hours (not knowing about Mum) and had her first child the following day. Or when my elderly cat died (she was grey and white and like my child as I have no children)., That same evening we were driving home from dinner with friends and I saw a flash of grey on the road way ahead. We investigated, and there was a koala standing in the middle of the road. Hubby took position in the middle of the road with hazzards flashing and I got out to try to shoo it off the road. The koala walked directly to me, it was grey with a white chest, just like my cat. It came so close that I thought it would climb onto me. I gently coaxed it to the side of the road and we walked along together looking for a suitable tree, I'm sure I could have held it's paw as we walked, it stayed that close, We walked for about 20 minutes, me talking softly and the koala walking with me it. It was very surreal. It eventually decided on a tree, and climbed to about my chest height, sat there and looked at me. I told it that it was time to go, and actually broke my rule of no touching - and reached out and stroked it on the shoulder, it never flinched, just kept looking at me and then slowly climbed the tree until it was out of the car headlight range.

It was in an area where some rescue koalas are released and I realised it may have been hand raised, but we were on a road we rarely go, just that I was a bit down, and hubby drove that way as it was quieter and pretty with some water views. Maybe just a coincidence..........

 

Edited by cbimages
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9 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

Gen, did that high-energy dog ever return to the farm?

 

Edo

 

Not of his own accord, no. It was dark in the evening when we got a call. He had been found on a nearby property. The person on that property called the property owner who called his son who called the nearby farmer who called hubby who called the dog owner... Such a relief! Imagine, our only job was to look after the dog. The owners come back, and no dog... We had grown very attached to the dog, I was in a flood of tears.

 

There are 2 possible explanations to his running away:

1. When I untied him at 5:30am, there was a spectacular sunrise over the peaks and the beach. But also lightning in the opposite direction. We didn't hear thunder but dogs can well before humans. We had been warned he was terrified of it.

2. He realised his owners were coming back and went to greet them. Dogs have a premonition for that. He actually ran off in that direction, not to the beach.

 

The owners were cool about it, they were actually trying to comfort us. It was hard not to have the opportunity to say goodbye to the dog. We had such a great time with him  with lots of stick throwing. As I always say, the hardest part with house sitting is to leave the dog behind at the end.

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8 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

Maybe he had a date with a fem dingo? He sure looks like a great dog. 

 

Downunder tip of the week: Don't pet box jelly fish.

 

Good luck to him! He had the snip!!

 

Defo no jellyfish petting. How amazing is this one? Blue Button Jellyfish

 

FKR0F7.jpg

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18 minutes ago, Michael Ventura said:

I had a magazine shoot of a local chef, yesterday, but since he made this "tomahawk" steak meal for the shot, I took the opportunity to shoot it alone as well.

 

food-tomahawk-steak-with-mushrooms-gravy

Have a heart-----it's an hour till lunch:D

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9 hours ago, Michael Ventura said:

I had a magazine shoot of a local chef, yesterday, but since he made this "tomahawk" steak meal for the shot, I took the opportunity to shoot it alone as well.

 

food-tomahawk-steak-with-mushrooms-gravy

I’ll take one order of that, please. Especially with the side order of ‘shrooms. Is that a T-bone? I’ve preferred ribeyes for so long now, I hardly recognize a T-bone shot from that angle. The thickness looks perfect…1.4 to 1.5 inches thick. (Maybe 2”)

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18 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

I’ll take one order of that, please. Especially with the side order of ‘shrooms. Is that a T-bone? I’ve preferred ribeyes for so long now, I hardly recognize a T-bone shot from that angle. The thickness looks perfect…1.4 to 1.5 inches thick. (Maybe 2”)

 
So on the menu it is called a tomahawk steak, but it is technically a ribeye.  It is cut so that the rib is left in and so it can resemble a hatchet or tomahawk.  It did look good but was only cooked enough for a photo shoot, so I was not able to sample it.

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2 hours ago, cbimages said:

Some more of the same from me. A gorgeous horned treehopper, a couple of robber flies with their prey and a cute katydid.

brown-horned-treehopper-pogonella-minutu

robber-fly-family-asilidae-species-unkno

robber-fly-family-asilidae-species-unkno

blackish-meadow-katydid-conocephalus-ani

 Excellent! I especially like the robber fly that has captured the Preying Mantis. Or is it praying? Both feed on other insects. Most, not all, insects eat vegetation so it’s interesting to see a bad boy eating another bad boy. It would be interesting to see one of those eating a spider. 

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2 hours ago, Michael Ventura said:

 
So on the menu it is called a tomahawk steak, but it is technically a ribeye.  It is cut so that the rib is left in and so it can resemble a hatchet or tomahawk.  It did look good but was only cooked enough for a photo shoot, so I was not able to sample it.

What a waste of something I can’t afford these days. I like mine medium well. Just a small amount of pink, no moos.

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3 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

 Excellent! I especially like the robber fly that has captured the Preying Mantis. Or is it praying? Both feed on other insects. Most, not all, insects eat vegetation so it’s interesting to see a bad boy eating another bad boy. It would be interesting to see one of those eating a spider. 

Thanks Betty, and it's Praying Mantis. I got beyond lucky a few days ago with a mantid that I see daily, been living on the same bush for ages. I look for it each day as it has bright orange armpits and a brilliant blue spot under it's arm, and I'm keen to get a photo of it with arms out. Damn thing is always just sitting, arms tucked at it's side, waiting for prey to came close. So, I said hello to it on the way down past its bush and on the way back, glanced over to it, in case the arms were out. And as I did, a female blue damselfly landed right next to it and "pounce", it got breakfast. I got one shot of the poor damselfly thrashing about and then the mantid chomped in, damselfly still squirming as it was eaten alive. It only took seconds for the eyes and face to be eaten, and half a minute for the head to be gone. A couple of minutes later and the whole meal was finished and the mantis had never even moved on the bush!

Photos still to be processed, but I'm really happy with a couple of them

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12 hours ago, cbimages said:

Thanks Betty, and it's Praying Mantis. I got beyond lucky a few days ago with a mantid that I see daily, been living on the same bush for ages. I look for it each day as it has bright orange armpits and a brilliant blue spot under it's arm, and I'm keen to get a photo of it with arms out. Damn thing is always just sitting, arms tucked at it's side, waiting for prey to came close. So, I said hello to it on the way down past its bush and on the way back, glanced over to it, in case the arms were out. And as I did, a female blue damselfly landed right next to it and "pounce", it got breakfast. I got one shot of the poor damselfly thrashing about and then the mantid chomped in, damselfly still squirming as it was eaten alive. It only took seconds for the eyes and face to be eaten, and half a minute for the head to be gone. A couple of minutes later and the whole meal was finished and the mantis had never even moved on the bush!

Photos still to be processed, but I'm really happy with a couple of them

It’s a bug eat bug world out there.

 

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Had a new driveway poured this weekend, now that I own the house I was renting, I need to make some improvements.  Hopefully a sale or two of the process will help out in the costs! I know, I am kidding myself.  Here is a snap of the workers.

 

workers-pouring-a-new-driveway-at-a-home

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57 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

protesters-against-racism-and-imperialis

 

I guess this would be what I'd be doing if I covered Live News. I'm not sure of their politics but I love their youthful energy. 

 

They seem to be a very confused bunch.

 

Allan

 

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More of the same from me, except it's cooling down and we've had so much rain the past month, that there is a few fungi popping up in the little forest where I go "bugging". First off is what is probably a March Fly, except it was also suggested it might be a Tangle Vein Fly. So I had to put a note in the caption. Who knew a simple fly would be so hard to ID. No one has any idea of species!  Then there's a Net Casting Spider, a dragonfly and a fungi.
march-fly-family-tabanidae-species-unkno

march-fly-family-tabanidae-species-unkno

net-casting-spider-deinopis-subrufa-also

fiery-skimmer-dragonfly-orthetrum-villos

fungi-golden-scruffy-collybia-cyptotrama

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54 minutes ago, cbimages said:

More of the same from me, except it's cooling down and we've had so much rain the past month, that there is a few fungi popping up in the little forest where I go "bugging". First off is what is probably a March Fly, except it was also suggested it might be a Tangle Vein Fly. So I had to put a note in the caption. Who knew a simple fly would be so hard to ID. No one has any idea of species!  Then there's a Net Casting Spider, a dragonfly and a fungi.
march-fly-family-tabanidae-species-unkno

march-fly-family-tabanidae-species-unkno

net-casting-spider-deinopis-subrufa-also

fiery-skimmer-dragonfly-orthetrum-villos

fungi-golden-scruffy-collybia-cyptotrama

 

I love the little wild looking fungi. As well as the other shots of course.

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1 hour ago, gvallee said:

 

I love the little wild looking fungi. As well as the other shots of course.

Thanks Gen, it was so tiny, but I went back 3 days later and the cap had opened although the cute "hairstyle" mainly gone. If it ever stops raining here, I'll be off looking for more cute fungi.
fungi-golden-scruffy-collybia-cyptotrama

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Because I am late

I will upload eight.

Ellis Mill Mill lane Lincoln

ellis-mill-mill-lane-lincoln-2022-2J03F1R.jpg

 

Group of school children on lincoln city educational outing High Street Lincoln

group-of-school-children-on-lincoln-city-educational-outing-high-street-lincoln-city-2022-2J03FJ9.jpg
 

House of Fraser store sign High Street Lincoln

house-of-fraser-store-sign-high-street-lincoln-city-2022-2J03G0X.jpg
 

looking down Well Lane to Steep Hill and across to St Martin's Street Lincolnlooking-down-well-lane-to-steep-hill-and-across-to-st-martins-street-lincoln-city-2022-2J03GE5.jpg

Books in the art shelves at bookshop.

books-in-the-art-shelves-at-bookshop-2J10KP6.jpg
 
 

Speakers' Corner Cornhill Square Lincoln cityspeakers-corner-cornhill-square-lincoln-city-2022-2J10N0N.jpg

 

Two young Asian ladies taking selfies in front of red heart shaped unit sponsoring St Barnabas Hospice Lincoln

two-young-asian-ladies-taking-selfies-in-front-of-red-heart-shaped-unit-sponsoring-st-barnabas-hospice-lincoln-2022-2J10NJF.jpg
 
 

Window cleaner in Bailgate Lincoln city

window-cleaner-in-bailgate-lincoln-city-2022-2J10NYW.jpg

 

Allan

 

Edited by Allan Bell
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