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What Do You Dislike About the Way Other Photogs Do Things?


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We all have out own workflow. I do what I do, and you do things . . . wrong. Yes, that's smart-assed and outrageous of me, but here we go. 

 

Why are so many photogs walking around with a lens hood on the lens in reverse? What is that supposed to do? Put the damn thing on right and live it on! Regardless of the lighting and flare, it won't do any hard. And it will protect the front element if you drop the camera or bump into something. 

 

And when they carry a DSLR or any other camera-shaped camera, why do they have the front of the lens pointing out? It can bump into people and things that way. Hang the camera over your shoulder with the lens pointed in at your butt. Yes, by 'they' I mean 'you!' 

 

Edwardo of Brooklyn

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I agree about the lens hood.  I always use one.

I don't like camera straps.  Never use them.  They get in my way.  I use a tripod a lot.  So I have a toploader bag from which I can quickly whip out my camera.  It also make a good support for the camera if I use it on my chest with a harness.

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Agree on the hood, though i sometimes will leave it reversed if just taking a snap and run, camera back in back shot. 

 

The one that bugs me is the photographers who keep artificial camera sounds on, especially when coming in environment where they should be quiet (bird photography for example).

 

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1 hour ago, Ed Rooney said:

Why are so many photogs walking around with a lens hood on the lens in reverse?

 

Probably for the same reason photogs and so many others wear a baseball style cap backwards with the brim in back,

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I honestly don't care much about how other photographers shoot unless it impacts others and puts us all in a bad light.  Such as being rude in other cultures, demanding strangers to do things just so their photo can be somehow better, getting into someone's personal space without, in some way, asking.  The golden rule is to be kind and leave places as you found them.

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1 hour ago, Phil said:

 

Probably for the same reason photogs and so many others wear a baseball style cap backwards with the brim in back,

 

actually i wear it that way when the brim keeps hitting my camera and bugs me too much, but as soon as camera down it goes back to the front. 

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1 hour ago, John Morrison said:

Please, Mr Photographer... don't tell me what your camera cost...

.......and don't look down on me because I still use a DSLR

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I hardly ever see people carrying cameras that look like cameras. Everyone here seems to use their phone. Does this bother me? Not really, unless they point them at me.  🤠

 

 

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2 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

Why do people ask me to hold their camera while they fetch a soda? Don’t they know I’ve stolen 39 cameras so far? 😉

They do know now. 😂

Edited by Rico
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8 hours ago, John Mitchell said:

I hardly ever see people carrying cameras that look like cameras. Everyone here seems to use their phone. Does this bother me? Not really, unless they point them at me.  🤠

 

 

It's surprising how many photographers don't like being photographed themselves. If I have got my shot and if I see I could be obstructing another photographer I will duck out of the way, but I still get photographed, sometimes obviously other times not. I'll sometimes show my wife what I get up to when I'm out and about when I've been photographed in a crowd scene. Typical is Carrie Johnson's Twitter masthead picture of me photographing her in London's Cavendish Square before she was married. I was just waiting for her to face me, clinging to a water fountain to gain a little extra height. An image I took from then was later published.

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2 hours ago, sb photos said:

 

 

It's surprising how many photographers don't like being photographed themselves. If I have got my shot and if I see I could be obstructing another photographer I will duck out of the way, but I still get photographed, sometimes obviously other times not. I'll sometimes show my wife what I get up to when I'm out and about when I've been photographed in a crowd scene. Typical is Carrie Johnson's Twitter masthead picture of me photographing her in London's Cavendish Square before she was married. I was just waiting for her to face me, clinging to a water fountain to gain a little extra height. An image I took from then was later published.

Intriguing !! but I refuse to look at her twitter!

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12 hours ago, meanderingemu said:

 

actually i wear it that way when the brim keeps hitting my camera and bugs me too much, but as soon as camera down it goes back to the front. 

 

I almost always have a Yankee cap on when shooting -- with the visor pointed forward. I'm wondering if you reach your elbow high when doing verticals? I don't. I keep both arms down and use my thumb on the release. I couldn't wear a helmet in combat though. 

 

I wore the cap with my SLRs. These small Sonys I'm using now call for different handling -- a wrist strap for one thing. RX10, a6000, and tiny RX100s. 

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What Do You Dislike About the Way Other Photogs Do Things?

 

Take better images than I do. Sell more on Alamy than I do. Get paid more than I do.🤪

 

Just Joking.

 

Allan

 

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People that have gone to the expense of purchasing a DSLR, but who don't have a clue how to use it...

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9 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

What Do You Dislike About the Way Other Photogs Do Things?

 

Take better images than I do. Sell more on Alamy than I do. Get paid more than I do.🤪

 

Just Joking.

 

Allan

 

  if we are going down those line, the one that gets me: have better access then I have.....🤣

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What I am really not keen on is when I am immersed in taking street images is someone popping up in front of me and start asking questions about the equipment I am using and what I take pictures of etc,etc.

 

Being the polite person that I am I answer their questions as best I can and try to explain photography related terms to the layman while seeing good shots being missed. Then they have the temerity to wander off taking photos on their mobile phone.

 

Allan

 

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16 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

And when they carry a DSLR or any other camera-shaped camera, why do they have the front of the lens pointing out? It can bump into people and things that way. Hang the camera over your shoulder with the lens pointed in at your butt. Yes, by 'they' I mean 'you!' 

 

I usually walk around with two camera - one with a longer lens, over my shoulder, pointing down and backwards, but the other with a wideangle, round my neck, pointing forwards - because I normally have my finger on the vertical shutter button ready to shoot 'from the hip' if something photo-worthy appears in front of me. 

It's a hit-and-miss approach to getting photos, but I 've sold quite a few of them

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I don't often meet other photographers, I'm more like Allan, I get irritated by the constant comments on the size of my DSLR. And that's only with the wide-angle lens. When it's my 80-400mm zoom, comments become more outlandish. I reply that it's only the baby one, which is true compared to my 500mm.

 

I had lots of good experiences with fellow photographers (thinking in particular about the Alligator Refuge in Florida) but two bad examples stick to mind.

 

The first one was in Brazil on a rainforest island. I had spotted an owl in a tree. I took a few shots from too far away to start with. A photographer spotted me, walked straight to the owl which promptly flew away. No decent shot. Another time in South Africa, Kruger National Park, I was cruising along in my car when I spotted two birds on the road. I stopped on the side and took shots through the window. The male then came closer to the car, too close, and started an incredible mating display. I engaged the reverse gear and just when I was about to press the pedal, I realised that a curious car had stopped right behind me, out of the whole park! No shots. I was incandescent. 

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Some of my pet hates are photographers shooting with their lens hood attached backwards, they would be better off throwing it away.
 

Another is how inconsiderate some photographers are in a scrum, trying to force their way through. I can remember a photographer outside Tottenham Police Station trying to force through other photographers, then pushing two women away that were family members of the group being photographed. I held my ground and got my shots via a monopod with camera attached over the heads of those in front, easy.

 

As complete contrast is a b@w print I still have of a shot I took of an orderly group of around 20 or more photographers taken in the 1980’s or early 90’s, some standing others kneeling, photographing the head of a CND march before it left Hyde Park.

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Agree with all of the above.  I wear the strap around my neck mainly because I'm accident prone and worried about dropping the camera, it's not necessarily pointing forward though sometimes I swing it around to the side.  I have an Optech strap which is slightly more comfortable that the Nikon one.  I always use the lens hood, don't get why some people don't but up to them.  The Nikon lenses always come with hoods, not sure about the Canon ones.  I used to do a lot more wildlife photography now and it really used to annoy me that some folk thought the bigger their lens the better their images would be.  I felt I was looked down upon carrying my then lowly 200-400mm F4 !  Although I met some lovely people, I started to feel that wildlife photography was getting very bitchy so found I was better keeping myself to myself.  Also as said above normally a massive scrum to see a certain bird or other wildlife, didn't like that either.

 

Also don't like when people disturb or ask for people to change what they are doing for the sake of a photo.  I thought long ago if you can't exclude something, just include it....

 

Carol

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22 minutes ago, Phil Robinson said:

I usually walk around with two camera - one with a longer lens, over my shoulder, pointing down and backwards, but the other with a wideangle, round my neck, pointing forwards - because I normally have my finger on the vertical shutter button ready to shoot 'from the hip' if something photo-worthy appears in front of me. 

It's a hit-and-miss approach to getting photos, but I 've sold quite a few of them

 

Me too, Phil. Or at least that's what I used to do when I used largest cameras. The one around my neck was usually a Leica M2. And I had a third body in a shoulder bag with 4 other lenses, all primes, hanging off my left arm. The RX100-VII is much easier to deal with . . . but that doesn't mean I'll stop complaining. 

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