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losdemas

Comet Ison

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I'm counting the days. November 28th is when it passes close to the sun. If it survives then it could be a fab subject for us in the northern hemisphere. Which is only fair as we missed out on the sensational Comet McNaught - for us in the north we got nothing and down in the southern hemisphere it was amazing. Google it and weep.

Cheers

Col

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I've never had a go at astro-photography at all.  Any tips or good websites where I can get a (rapid!) lesson or two? (panicking :wacko: )

 

I have this dreadful feeling we're going to be clouded over for the duration! :(

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Also, if you are interested in astronomy, in particular solar events, then have a look at www.spaceweather.com. Its a great site, just one page updated daily and its full of interesting facts, links and frequently some astounding photos. No, I don't have a vested interest in it, its just one of my daily visit sites.

 

Cheers

 

Col

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Losdemas

Astrophotos got a billion times easier with digital cameras. You'll need your fastest lens wide open. For the comet a 50mm is pretty good, even 100mm. Stars are non-extended objects so the larger the diameter of the lens, the more stars you will record, but you will have a narrower field of view and the stars will turn to trails at a shorter shutter speed. Put your iSO at about 800, stick the camera on a tripod and start exposing with 5 seconds and see how you go. Keep going up in 5 or 10 second increments until you see that your stars start to become trails. Just google astrophotography, there are loads of sites with info on how to get going. You'll be surprised at how much sky detail you can record on a digital sensor. Get out there and have a play. Its a lovely branch of photography, the night sky is just gorgeous.

Col

Edited by Colin Woods
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I've never had a go at astro-photography at all.  Any tips or good websites where I can get a (rapid!) lesson or two? (panicking :wacko: )

 

I have this dreadful feeling we're going to be clouded over for the duration! :(

There are some very good things on how to start astrophotgraphy on space.com, just google it. also astrophotgraphy is really great fun it gives photography a new light. also make sure you don't shake or touch of the camera slightest touch can destory the photo.

 

I'm hoping ison doesn't fly into the sun or get destroyed by it.

 

P.S. Losdemas, if you need any help on this just pm me :)

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Thanks for your help with this guys: I'll wait for a cloudless sky and give it a go.

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I know. I'm disappointed that ISON didn't stay the course. It was only 3000 degrees celsius as well - they don't make comets like they used to. I'll have to hit the bottle now.

 

Cheers

 

Col

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I know. I'm disappointed that ISON didn't stay the course. It was only 3000 degrees celsius as well - they don't make comets like they used to. I'll have to hit the bottle now.

 

Cheers

 

Col

You've given me an idea! To save everyone's disappointment, I'll get some Acorns set them on fire and throw them across the night sky (the same day's as it was expected to pass) make sure you have you cameras ready everyone!

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Thanks PatrioticAlien but its no use to me, I live in Quebec. I'll stick with hitting the bottle. In fact I have already done so as its beer o'clock.

Cheers

Col

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It is always Pym's o'clock here!

 

Allan

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Seems to be some hope of a resurrection.  See:  http://tinyurl.com/s6sx

 

Steve

Thanks for the 'heads-up', Steve.

 

"Astronomers admit to being surprised and delighted, but now caution that anything could happen in the coming hours and days.

This remnant of Ison could continue to brighten, or it could simply fizzle out altogether."

 

The little tease. :wub:

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Seems to be some hope of a resurrection.  See:  http://tinyurl.com/s6sx

 

Steve

 

Thanks for the 'heads-up', Steve.

 

"Astronomers admit to being surprised and delighted, but now caution that anything could happen in the coming hours and days.

This remnant of Ison could continue to brighten, or it could simply fizzle out altogether."

 

 

The little tease. :wub:

You have saved the squirrel from losing his beloved nuts (for now)

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It would be nice if it gave us a show, just imagine the excitement if it shows up on Christmas Day #justsayin

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It would be nice if it gave us a show, just imagine the excitement if it shows up on Christmas Day #justsayin

There are so many variables, on what could happen to ison from its encounter with the sun to the (possibale) viewing of ison from earth.

 

We aren't even sure how bright it is (yet) however, based on best day to view it is the 26th it should still be very close to earth on the 25th.

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Astro is so interesting. I managed to get a glimpse of the milky way 50 miles out from Glasgow. Tokina 11mm, ISO1600, f/2.8, 30 second exposure. There's a lot more to it than what I can do, but it's nice basics to work with. 

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Astro is so interesting. I managed to get a glimpse of the milky way 50 miles out from Glasgow. Tokina 11mm, ISO1600, f/2.8, 30 second exposure. There's a lot more to it than what I can do, but it's nice basics to work with. 

Hi Paul,

You've probably spotted this already, but if not, here's a really great Astrophotography tutorial by Adam Woodworth (The Luminous Landscape).  With some Beautiful picture's to back up his teachings. http://www.luminous-landscape.com/essays/night_sky___astrophotography.shtml

 

Think I'll give it a try this winter, if not for Alamy, then just for a nice picture or two to hang on my wall.

Cheers,

 

Parm  :)

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