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11 hours ago, MDM said:

 

I think sticking with what you have is sensible unless you have a very good reason to go mirrorless (weight or taking up video mainly). The weight advantage is only significant for some lenses - the telephotos do not differ a lot between DSLR and mirrorless within the same system. So the Nikon mirrorless are very light with the 24-70 f4 lens but stick a 70-200 on one  and there is little difference. between that and a DSLR with the same lens. Canon seem to be more expensive for their newer mirrorless bodies and lenses as well in comparison to equivalent Nikon and Sony gear. 

I am going out this morning to trade in my Nikon D610 and 24-70 f2.8 against a Nikon Z6 II with 24-70 f4 and FTZ adaptor. The D610 and 24-70 combo is my workhorse kit but I am finding it increasingly tiring lugging it around when I go walkabout. Also want something smaller and more discreet. I will keep my 70-200 f2.8 and 14-24 f2.8 since they are lenses I don't carry around on long walks for general street work.

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1 hour ago, Dave Richards said:

I am going out this morning to trade in my Nikon D610 and 24-70 f2.8 against a Nikon Z6 II with 24-70 f4 and FTZ adaptor. The D610 and 24-70 combo is my workhorse kit but I am finding it increasingly tiring lugging it around when I go walkabout. Also want something smaller and more discreet. I will keep my 70-200 f2.8 and 14-24 f2.8 since they are lenses I don't carry around on long walks for general street work.

 

Sounds like a really good idea especially if you have health problems as you mentioned in another thread. The Z6II with the 24-70f4 is a really light combo for going anywhere but there is very little weight advantage changing the 70-200 to the Z version. Best of luck with the trade-in.

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21 hours ago, MDM said:

 

Sounds like a really good idea especially if you have health problems as you mentioned in another thread. The Z6II with the 24-70f4 is a really light combo for going anywhere but there is very little weight advantage changing the 70-200 to the Z version. Best of luck with the trade-in.

Thanks Michael.

Mission accomplished; just need to find out how to drive the thing now. It is a huge difference in size and weight compared to my previous kit, so more comfortable all round.

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2 hours ago, Dave Richards said:

Thanks Michael.

Mission accomplished; just need to find out how to drive the thing now. It is a huge difference in size and weight compared to my previous kit, so more comfortable all round.

 

Great Dave. The menu system on the Nikon Z cameras is very similar to the Nikon DSLR menus so the transition is not too difficult. The i button on the back brings up a customisable box that is very useful for making quick changes so is well worth getting to know. The IBIS in conjunction with the 24-70 lens and a steady hand makes it possible to shoot at very slow shutter speeds which, together with the lightness of the body-lens combo, opens up a whole new world for walkabout photography and the image quality is amazing. 

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Received my Z7ii a couple of days ago, only done a couple of test shots so far. I am impressed with image quality and as you say Michael seems I can shoot at lower shutter speeds than with the D850. Will give it a run out over the weekend.

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Hi Ed,

Yes i bought into the Canon R5 mirrorless system with a bunch of the new RF lenses...I just had to try it first hand and bought the Rf f2 / 28 to 70L zoom which is a heavy lens, but yes it's very sharp and having that f2 aperture throughout the focal range is nice! The other RF lenses i owned were also great...

 

Now coming from the Canon 5D3 and 5D4 to the Canon R5 was interesting in that it took me a bit to get used to the EVF viewfinder...but i got to like it for being able to review a shot in the finder, plus there was a lot of viewfinder information that was a bit distracting at first..Well what can i say, the Canon R5 with its people and animal eye tracking options is excellent, but even though i bought another set of batteries as i had the battery grip as well as i found the drain on battery life was a problem.It probably didn't help matters that i got into the habit of reviewing images in the viewfinder a lot more than i needed too..

 

Yes going mirrorless for me didn't make me a better photographer lol...It didn't really save me weight as the prime RF lenses are quite heavy...Ok the Canon R5 and grip  is a bit smaller than a DSLR 5D4 and grip, but i actually liked the feel of the DSLR 5D4 better...

 

Well lucky i did not sell off Canon DSLR kit as i have returned to using and enjoying it, the Canon DSLR 5D4...I even added a few more EF lenses to my kit! The quality of the EF L lenses is much the same as the quality of the mirrorless RF lenses and 30 megapixels is plenty more than enough for shooting stock..If i was still a working professional i would have stayed with the new mirrorless system having spent all that money changing over..I did buy most of the new Canon mirrorless at great sale prices etc, and yes i have lost some money but i enjoyed trying out the latest camera and lens technology.

 

I am once again enjoying using my Canon DSLR 5D4 with its optical viewfinder and all is well..the sky hasn't fallen on me..lol

I can and do enjoy using my older tech kit...but i do understand the enjoyment that many other photographers get from upgrading / changing photographic equipment..I have been doing just that for years..

 

Ed you have the excellent Sony RX cameras which are light and compact and you produce quality photography with those cameras...It's in the end about making images, but yeah it's fun to enjoy the benefits of new equipment...

 

 

PS...

 

Oh i forgot to mention a big plus for the mirrorless Canon R5 camera and also the R6...IBIS or In Body Image Stabilisation...Now this feature does help in keeping your camera steadier when hand holding, allowing you to handhold  and choose slower shutter speeds or and stop down your aperture to suit your depth of field..When you use an image stabilised lens as well, you have an even more stable camera allowing you more combinations of aperture and shutter speed...meaning sharper pictures at lower hand held shutter speeds..A great feature to have.

 

So now i have left the Canon R5 at home, and ventured down to a lake in my hometown of Ballarat Australia carrying my Canon DSLR 5D4....The sun was setting and the light's  golden rays made for a picturesque Winter scenic..I have my Canon EF f2.8 / 24 to 70 Lii on the camera, now both camera and lens does not have stabilisation and i had to focus on my handholding technique more once again to keep things steady..Ok i ended up choosing an ISO of 200 and 1/100th @ f10 ...Now the shot turned out great, sharp and with plenty of depth of field with the lens set to 28mm...Examining the 30 megapixel raw file was a delight again...Yes it would have been a little easier to achieve this shot with a Canon mirrorless R5 and the R5 does have 45 megapixels to play with.It is a great camera no doubt....but i know that i can still produce high quality results with my trusty DSLR 5D4 camera.

 

 

 

Edited by William Caram
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On 14/09/2021 at 11:00, MDM said:

 

Great Dave. The menu system on the Nikon Z cameras is very similar to the Nikon DSLR menus so the transition is not too difficult. The i button on the back brings up a customisable box that is very useful for making quick changes so is well worth getting to know. The IBIS in conjunction with the 24-70 lens and a steady hand makes it possible to shoot at very slow shutter speeds which, together with the lightness of the body-lens combo, opens up a whole new world for walkabout photography and the image quality is amazing. 

As you say Michael, the menu is straight forward and I've set up the general stuff. Just getting my head around the AF system which is on another level to the D610. I really like the tilting touch screen too and the fact I can focus and take the shot with just two taps. Great for discreet street work.

The only drawback now is that my old version of Lightroom won't provide correction for the Z lens so I guess I may need to be looking for a new editing suite; probably not Lightroom 'cos I don't want to commit to a monthly subscription, at least not yet. Thinking of going with Affinity.......may try the free trial. Any feedback or recommendations from current users would be appreciated.

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1 hour ago, Dave Richards said:

As you say Michael, the menu is straight forward and I've set up the general stuff. Just getting my head around the AF system which is on another level to the D610. I really like the tilting touch screen too and the fact I can focus and take the shot with just two taps. Great for discreet street work.

The only drawback now is that my old version of Lightroom won't provide correction for the Z lens so I guess I may need to be looking for a new editing suite; probably not Lightroom 'cos I don't want to commit to a monthly subscription, at least not yet. Thinking of going with Affinity.......may try the free trial. Any feedback or recommendations from current users would be appreciated.

 

The lens profiles for the Z lenses are built in to the raw file and can't be changed in Lightroom (the CC versions at least). I don't know the perpetual licence versions but I suspect to would be the same. Sony cameras do something similar as far as I know. 

 

I have only scratched the surface of Affinity (my wife has it) but, the last time I looked back in March, the raw converter was lacking some features that I would regard as very important. If I was to change from Adobe, it would be DxO Photo Lab which has a very good raw converter plus a lot of other features - the local adjustment tools are excellent. Worth a look I think. I got it very cheap on a Black Friday deal a few years ago to check it out and it is impressive. It is a modular system so you can add other features.

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1 hour ago, MDM said:

 

The lens profiles for the Z lenses are built in to the raw file and can't be changed in Lightroom (the CC versions at least). I don't know the perpetual licence versions but I suspect to would be the same. Sony cameras do something similar as far as I know. 

 

I have only scratched the surface of Affinity (my wife has it) but, the last time I looked back in March, the raw converter was lacking some features that I would regard as very important. If I was to change from Adobe, it would be DxO Photo Lab which has a very good raw converter plus a lot of other features - the local adjustment tools are excellent. Worth a look I think. I got it very cheap on a Black Friday deal a few years ago to check it out and it is impressive. It is a modular system so you can add other features.

Thanks Michael. I have heard good things about it so I'll take a look at DxO too.

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5 hours ago, Dave Richards said:

The only drawback now is that my old version of Lightroom won't provide correction for the Z lens

I also use Lightroom Perpetual, 6.14 in my case, surely the problem is that LR won't process RAW files from the R5? I guess one option is to use Iridient Developer to batch convert to DNGs which can then be imported into Lightroom. I use Iridient for my Fuji files because it does a better job at converting the RAWs on certain images (landscapes, distant foliage etc.) but that is specifically a Fuji issue, now addressed to an extent in Lightroom CC, I don't know about Canon RAW conversion but there is a free trial for that as well, though the resulting files are watermarked.

 

I don't think there is anything that will replace the database side of Lightroom. Affinity may indeed be worth a try for processing, it's a fairly different interface though.

 

https://www.iridientdigital.com/products/ctransformer_cameras.html

Edited by Harry Harrison
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