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Hello everyone,

 

Like i said before i will transfer all the unsold Editorial Microstock images to Alamy.

 

I am just curious about what you think about images like the following. Sorry for the Istock watermark :(... i am not at my home computer so i had to take it from online somewhere. I hope to have it deleted soon and replacing in Alamy. What do you think... since my first sold image was a glass of beer with the brand Lech i feel that Polish product images could fit Alamy.

 

stock-photo-30412446-fruit-yoghurt.jpg

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Looks too dark to me. I guess a white background still works best for this kind of photography.

 

Cheers,

Philippe

+1

Mirco, All my product image sales have had a white background. I use a piece of A1 white board that you can get from any art shop.

 

Regards

Craig

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Thanks!

 

My point is that i dont have time and feel to isolate images. Some people like to do it but it is not really my thing. Even if the sales changes are maybe less i prefer to shoot them on wooden tables or outdoor. I see many photographers shooting on wooden backgrounds or whatever.... but i have to admit they have far better context then mine here. Maybe this example has to flat background with nothing adding. Maybe some real fruit around the product would make it better.

 

But Craig.... Do you isolate your images?

 

Mirco

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Thanks!

 

My point is that i dont have time and feel to isolate images. Some people like to do it but it is not really my thing. Even if the sales changes are maybe less i prefer to shoot them on wooden tables or outdoor. I see many photographers shooting on wooden backgrounds or whatever.... but i have to admit they have far better context then mine here. Maybe this example has to flat background with nothing adding. Maybe some real fruit around the product would make it better.

 

But Craig.... Do you isolate your images?

 

Mirco

 

Two examples that sold-Both text book use.

CFRJ14.jpg

 

BTC36X.jpg

 

Regards

Craig

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Thanks you Craig for your openess :).

 

The images doesnt look like a cut out so this answers my question. I really dont like cut outs even if it is easy to do with square and round objects. Somehow i doenst look real enough. I prefer to have a not 100 percent white background with natural shadows and edges then otherway. Or you need of course a nice tabletop with light coming from under like Philippe has.

Edited by Mirco Vacca

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I haven't done this kind of shot yet, (but certainly should start).  I wouldn't put (most) food on a dark brown background though - it just doesn't work.  A light Pine table,yes, but dark wood just doesn't make the food look appetising, especially for something dairy like yoghurt.  If it was a beef stew, maybe. Horses for courses (no pun intended, there!)

 

I guess that this is why, unless you are doing food (or other products) regularly and have the time, space and props, then most folk will opt for the white background.

 

I wish that I was more of a handyman as the item you linked to Philippe is ideal. So simple - yet so pricey for what it is!

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Secondhand hospital X-ray light boxes come up regularly - about 40cmx70cm - bought a couple for £25 - worth a look in the usual places !

  • Upvote 1

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Thanks!

 

My point is that i dont have time and feel to isolate images. Some people like to do it but it is not really my thing. Even if the sales changes are maybe less i prefer to shoot them on wooden tables or outdoor. I see many photographers shooting on wooden backgrounds or whatever.... but i have to admit they have far better context then mine here. Maybe this example has to flat background with nothing adding. Maybe some real fruit around the product would make it better.

 

But Craig.... Do you isolate your images?

 

Mirco

 

Mirco 

 

You'll often see prepared food or produce shot in a more natural setting rather than on a white background (although you'll also see them on white as well). Certainly modern editorial food images have a much more rustic and sometimes "messy" (salt spills, discarded leaves, torn parchment, vintage cutlery, biscuit crumbs) feel about them.

 

For product/packing images such as the yoghurt pots you posted above then I'd say that you would see them more on a white background - but that doesn't mean they have to be cut-outs - they could as Philippe, Danny, David etc have said just be well lit with minimal shadow - very much possible to do in-camera with the right external lighting and background whether it is a piece of A1 board, light-box or custom shooting table or cove.

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Forget the tabletop.  I've wasted my money over the years on table top studios - they are a waste of time, space, and money.

 

Go to your local craft store and buy a roll of poster paper.  Here in the US, you can get a roll in any color you want (including white) in a 5 foot length for about $12.

 

I have photographed everything from jewelry to cats and dogs on that poster paper.  It's easy, it's portable, it works with any table, and all you need are a coupe of cheap speedlights to light it - Vivitar 285 strobes can be bought for less than $50 USD used on eBay.  It's all you need.  Here is a setup at an animal shelter I was photographing cats at.  I used an Elinchrom Ranger with beauty dish as a key light and two Vivitar 285 speedlights as side lights.  The "table" was a rolling cart.

 

r26jvm.jpg

 

One of the images from that shoot is this one...

 

CT7058.jpg

 

Here is an image from a jewelry shoot - same setup  using black cardboard on the sides as reflectors

 

D49T7X.jpg

 

The jewelry is from a commissioned shoot - the clients were with me for 8 hours that day as we took images of various necklaces, bracelets, and earrings.

  • Upvote 2

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Lovely shelter cat, Ed.

 

- Ann

 

Forget the tabletop.  I've wasted my money over the years on table top studios - they are a waste of time, space, and money.

 

Go to your local craft store and buy a roll of poster paper.  Here in the US, you can get a roll in any color you want (including white) in a 5 foot length for about $12.

 

I have photographed everything from jewelry to cats and dogs on that poster paper.  It's easy, it's portable, it works with any table, and all you need are a coupe of cheap speedlights to light it - Vivitar 285 strobes can be bought for less than $50 USD used on eBay.  It's all you need.  Here is a setup at an animal shelter I was photographing cats at.  I used an Elinchrom Ranger with beauty dish as a key light and two Vivitar 285 speedlights as side lights.  The "table" was a rolling cart.

 

 

 

One of the images from that shoot is this one...

 

CT7058.jpg

 

Here is an image from a jewelry shoot - same setup  using black cardboard on the sides as reflectors

 

 

 

The jewelry is from a commissioned shoot - the clients were with me for 8 hours that day as we took images of various necklaces, bracelets, and earrings.

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Here's an article which actually goes back rather a way, but I'm still using the same kit except for the cameras mentioned:

 

http://www.photoclubalpha.com/2007/06/15/studio-light-table-technique/

 

If you choose to use white card, which I have occasionally, your lighting choices are restricted in a very big way and blowing the card out (if you want to) usually involved blowing out product highlights too. Also, not all white card is equal - white studio background paper contains no UV brightener and stays neutral, many white cards sold by stationers have brigheners and will render too blue, and many artist's card/papers are too warm. One of the best choices is white vinyl sold for studio use.

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In a funny way I quite like Mircos image.

 

There is a restaurant where I sometimes eat which has black (or almost black) tables and I sometimes take photos of the dish when it is served up. Personally I think it works quite well on a black background.

 

But it is horses for courses and whatever background suits is good.

 

Allan

 

CW25CJ.jpg

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Forget the tabletop. I've wasted my money over the years on table top studios - they are a waste of time, space, and money.

 

Go to your local craft store and buy a roll of poster paper. Here in the US, you can get a roll in any color you want (including white) in a 5 foot length for about $12.

 

I have photographed everything from jewelry to cats and dogs on that poster paper. It's easy, it's portable, it works with any table, and all you need are a coupe of cheap speedlights to light it - Vivitar 285 strobes can be bought for less than $50 USD used on eBay. It's all you need. Here is a setup at an animal shelter I was photographing cats at. I used an Elinchrom Ranger with beauty dish as a key light and two Vivitar 285 speedlights as side lights. The "table" was a rolling cart.

 

One of the images from that shoot is this one...

 

CT7058.jpg

 

 

Lovely shot of that cat... great expression!

 

I don't bother with a light box either, I use 2x speedlights and a small mobile / handheld flash.

 

One of the speedlights in a soft-box (same positioning as your Ranger), one pointing at a reflector behind the subject the mobile flash is attached to a shoot through umbrella so I can quickly move around with it to provide directional light /shadows. As a table, I use my white formica paper draws :) although I do have a roll of white paper when the objects are too big for the draws. I also use Manfrotto magic arms and super clamps a lot when working in confined spaces.... saves on floor space.

Edited by Duncan_Andison

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In a funny way I quite like Mircos image.

 

There is a restaurant where I sometimes eat which has black (or almost black) tables and I sometimes take photos of the dish when it is served up. Personally I think it works quite well on a black background.

 

But it is horses for courses and whatever background suits is good.

 

Allan

 

CW25CJ.jpg

 

WHOOA! Just noticed I should have cleaned the spoon before shooting. Maybe I'll just remove it from the shot?

 

Allan

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Probably not much more work to 'clean' it in PS.

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Ed. What a beautiful cat shot!!!!!

 

That deserves to sell and sell and sell. Bloody brilliant!!!!

 

Oh, and thanks for the tips on the table top set up, very useful  :)

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NYCat agrees. A big meow followed by purring.

 

Paulette

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On National Public Radio yesterday I heard a chef/cookbook writer say that most food looks better on a white background. Makes sense, otherwise we can have the colors in the background arguing with the colors in the food. But in restaurants we don't often have a choice.

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And if the food is arranged on a white plate set on a black background like an earlier example?

Edited by Lynn Palmer

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My apologies to Allan, but I don't feel that image works. The black sends the wrong message. And yes I do have images of food on a white plate on a black table, but I don't think mine work either. 

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My apologies to Allan, but I don't feel that image works. The black sends the wrong message. And yes I do have images of food on a white plate on a black table, but I don't think mine work either. 

 

That is OK Ed, no need to apologise, we are all entitled to our opinions. I am pleased you made the effort to comment.

 

Still friends, Allan

  • Upvote 1

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