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Lovely photos!

I'm quite new here myself. I understand that it's a good idea to include the latin names of plants and animals, and the location, in the captions. 

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I love the tiger cub in the grass, licking his chops. I think it is a cub and I would put that in the caption and keywords as well as "licking" and "tongue". I don't understand why your caption says Sambar. I would also capitalize the name of the park. It is not really necessary but I think it looks more professional to capitalize the way the words would appear in an article in a magazine. And, yes, put the common name and latin name in the caption too. Nice portfolio. I had a wonderful time in Bandhavgarh. The tigers are so magnificent and I also really enjoyed watching the monkeys.

 

Paulette

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For urban and landscape photos put more detail about the location in both caption and keywords. Include the names of buildings, businesses, street as well as town. Most images sold here are used to illustrate a very specific subject, general terms such as landscape, mountains etc may be searched from time to time, but you are more likely to end up at the top of the search result if you specify which mountain is in the picture.

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Hi Nilanjan,

Some very nice photos and subject matter. Just to add to some comments by others:

https://www.alamy.com/contributor/how-to-sell-images/captions-and-keywords-for-images/?section=8

"Before you start, think about the potential use of the image and what it’s likely to be sold for, the more accurately you describe your image, the more visibility it will have in customer searches, which will significantly increase your chance of making a sale."

 

My main comment however, is that some of your images are a bit underexposed:

 

Seems exposed for background, not foreground where the subject is:

Tigress playing with her cubs - Stock Image

 

 

Blackbuck in Gujrat,India - Stock Image

Bengal Tiger from central-Indian landscape Stock Photo

 

 
 
Kinabantangen river of Borneo, Malaysia - Stock Image

Steve
 
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Thank you so much everyone, the feedback was very helpful...

I'll update the caption with the latin names and the area where the photographs were taken.

@steve I'll look into the exposure issue and keep in mind for future photographs.

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1 hour ago, Steve F said:

My main comment however, is that some of your images are a bit underexposed:

 

Seems exposed for background, not foreground where the subject is:

 

I'm not so sure. The pix you pointed out look almospheric to me, in a good way.

 

Nilanjan... image R1XPB4 is captioned as 'Steppe Eagle', when it looks more like a hawfinch (?).

 

2BPAJMB, 'tigress playing with her cubs'. There are no cubs in the pic...

 

 

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Just now, John Morrison said:

 

I'm not so sure. The pix you pointed out look almospheric to me, in a good way.

 

Nilanjan... image R1XPB4 is captioned as 'Steppe Eagle', when it looks more like a hawfinch (?).

 

2BPAJMB, 'tigress playing with her cubs'. There are no cubs in the pic...

 

 

 

I thought about this and it is subjective. The landscape exposed correctly, the tigers hiding in shadow, which is realistic... But the tigers are the main subject, I thought they looked a bit flat...

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4 minutes ago, Steve F said:

subjective

Yes, of course. A bit more contrast might help (adding contrast is what I tend to do). But lower contrast can work too. And a darker subject might work in suggesting hiding, or hunting, or being hunted, or camouflage, etc...

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I agree about it being subjective! I too thought they were nicely atmospheric, but I see what Steve means too. As we don't know the preferences of potential buyers, maybe in cases like this it's a good idea to have some of each?

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On 23/07/2021 at 14:00, John Morrison said:

Nilanjan... image R1XPB4 is captioned as 'Steppe Eagle', when it looks more like a hawfinch (?).

It's correctly keyworded as Red-headed Bullfinch, but the mistake is in the caption.

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I would add some contrast too, Nilanjan. If this was art photography, I would not suggest that, but this is stock and adding some punch to your images is a good idea. I do like your images. Good luck and welcome to Alamy. 

 

Edo

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Welcome Nilanjan,

I have been submitting nature and wildlife pictures since 2016 and have almost 2000 pictures in my portfolio. There's plenty of nature photographers with Alamy so make sure your work stands out, edit ruthlessly, avoid submitting batches of similars, calibrate your monitor for colour and exposure accuracy, use histograms in Photoshop or Lightroom-many of your pictures are over saturated and/or under exposed, caption accurately using Latin names for species and take pictures of subjects you come to know well. The quality of your wildlife images count more than the quantity-that is what will ensure sales. I think you have some nice pictures and India offers so many great opportunities for capturing amazing animals on film so keep photographing and gradually build up your portfolio. Always compare and critique your work and your images will improve in quality. When I compare my first submissions in 2016 with today's submissions I can see improvement and you will too. I'm jealous of all the wonderful wildlife you have on your doorstep so make the most of it and good luck!

 

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11 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

I would add some contrast too, Nilanjan. If this was art photography, I would not suggest that, but this is stock and adding some punch to your images is a good idea. I do like your images. Good luck and welcome to Alamy. 

 

Edo

Thank you so much for the suggestion...Ed 
I'll definitely keep that in mind while editing in future

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7 hours ago, Dominic Robinson said:

Welcome Nilanjan,

 

I have been submitting nature and wildlife pictures since 2016 and have almost 2000 pictures in my portfolio. There's plenty of nature photographers with Alamy so make sure your work stands out, edit ruthlessly, avoid submitting batches of similars, calibrate your monitor for colour and exposure accuracy, use histograms in Photoshop or Lightroom-many of your pictures are over saturated and/or under exposed, caption accurately using Latin names for species and take pictures of subjects you come to know well. The quality of your wildlife images count more than the quantity-that is what will ensure sales. I think you have some nice pictures and India offers so many great opportunities for capturing amazing animals on film so keep photographing and gradually build up your portfolio. Always compare and critique your work and your images will improve in quality. When I compare my first submissions in 2016 with today's submissions I can see improvement and you will too. I'm jealous of all the wonderful wildlife you have on your doorstep so make the most of it and good luck!

 

 

Thank you so much Dominic, I agree there are wonderful opportunities to photograph amazing wildlife up close here.

I'll definitely use your advice while submitting in future. I prefer not to submit batches of same wildlife and try to focus more on the quality as you have mentioned. I need to emphasize more on the editing and processing part I feel.

 

P.S. I can help you out if you are planning to come here to photograph wildlife anytime in future.

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Thanks for the offer! I was photographing in Thattekad Bird Sanctuary two years ago and before that visited Bharatpur Bird Sanctuary many times and Blackbuck National Park on two visits. All great places to see wildlife!

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  • 1 month later...

you may disagree

but as for me

in ACR or similar:

a. exposure slider add +0.5

b. contrast slider to +60
c. highlights slider to -80

d. shadows slider to +80

e. texture slider to +40

f. vibrance slider to +40

g. saturation slider to 0

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On 09/09/2021 at 19:33, FocusUno said:

you may disagree

but as for me

in ACR or similar:

a. exposure slider add +0.5

b. contrast slider to +60
c. highlights slider to -80

d. shadows slider to +80

e. texture slider to +40

f. vibrance slider to +40

g. saturation slider to 0

Alternatively... try clicking the "Auto" button in ACR

 

Mark

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