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Who knows the proper term for an architectural street sign, such as this?

 

2G13GK2.jpg

And, what is the proper term describing the type of perspective seen in the sign (and building) here?

2G13GFT.jpg

Knowing the answers to these questions will help me sleep at night--I've been calling the 2nd "diminishing perspective"--which I just made up.  Have looked at architectural and drawing terminology terms and found the answer to neither.  

Grateful for your help.

--Michael

Edited by MilesbeforeIsleep
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6 hours ago, David Pimborough said:

 

The first is a monumental sign or monument sign

 

 

 

The second you have your answer :)

Thanks, David.  Monument sign it will be.

 

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9 minutes ago, David Pimborough said:

 

You should add "monumental sign" too

 

Monumental as in BIG. Extremely large.

 

Allan

 

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Gigantic . . . enormous . . . and so on. 🤪

 

I like monumental sign. It reads like a search term. 

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18 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

Gigantic . . . enormous . . . and so on. 🤪

 

I like monumental sign. It reads like a search term. 

 

which sadly has not been used once in a year on AoA

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4 hours ago, David Pimborough said:

 

Or humungous 😆

Yeah.  "monumental" is an adjective which I hear as meaning 'really big'.  But I understand the other usage and will include both.

Thanks, guys.

 

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On 16/06/2021 at 02:10, MilesbeforeIsleep said:

Who knows the proper term for an architectural street sign, such as this?

 

2G13GK2.jpg

And, what is the proper term describing the type of perspective seen in the sign (and building) here?

2G13GFT.jpg

Knowing the answers to these questions will help me sleep at night--I've been calling the 2nd "diminishing perspective"--which I just made up.  Have looked at architectural and drawing terminology terms and found the answer to neither.  

Grateful for your help.

--Michael

 

Is the second one called a three quarter view?

 

John.

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36 minutes ago, Stokie said:

 

Is the second one called a three quarter view?

 

John.

I wonder if we are all overthinking it? These very precise descriptions are probably no longer used by young, underpaid, picture editors searching for photos. We probably need to start using more 'street' type descriptions to be in with a chance of getting minted, innit?

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I usually hear the word monumental in conjunction with a mistake or error. EG it was a monumental error. Or more likely, it was a monumental cock up.

 

Edited by noelbennett
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53 minutes ago, noelbennett said:

I usually hear the word monumental in conjunction with a mistake or error. EG it was a monumental error. Or more likely, it was a monumental cock up.

 

 

No doubt because there have so many monumental mistakes in recent times. Look no further than how badly the pandemic has been managed in so many places one does not even need to be specific.  But it can be positive - just think of ................. eh oh forget it, the brain fog is bad today.....😎

 

 

AH just remembered one - the vaccination programme - that was a monumentally good decision by the UK government to get that in place early.

Edited by MDM
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I'm not saying anything.

 

Allan

 

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There was a pretty monumental mistake in the New Statesman online today. A small piece about the fact that Juneteenth has been made a federal holiday here...  they say it commemorates June 19 1965, where (perhaps they mean when) news of the of the Emancipation Proclamation reached the people of Galveston, Texas, freeing slaves in the last rebelling state. Of course, not quite the right century. I figure it was a young person's error. 1965 sounded like a very long time ago.

 

Paulette

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28 minutes ago, NYCat said:

There was a pretty monumental mistake in the New Statesman online today. A small piece about the fact that Juneteenth has been made a federal holiday here...  they say it commemorates June 19 1965, where (perhaps they mean when) news of the of the Emancipation Proclamation reached the people of Galveston, Texas, freeing slaves in the last rebelling state. Of course, not quite the right century. I figure it was a young person's error. 1965 sounded like a very long time ago.

 

Paulette

 

A young person having a senior moment as they call it? Ageist any way you look at it although hopefully not ageism of the offensive kind. 

 

 

Edited by MDM
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On 18/06/2021 at 17:56, NYCat said:

 June 19 1965, where (perhaps they mean when) news of the of the Emancipation Proclamation reached the people of Galveston, Texas,

Well some do say Texas is a bit backward........perhaps they didn't learn to read until 1965...........

Edited by spacecadet
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2 hours ago, spacecadet said:

Well some do say Texas is a bit backward........perhaps they didn't learn to read until 1965...........

 

Not that funny, actually, since during the vile time of slavery slaves were not allowed to learn to read. 

 

Paulette

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13 hours ago, NYCat said:

 

Not that funny, actually, since during the vile time of slavery slaves were not allowed to learn to read. 

 

Paulette

Thankyou for the history lesson but I'm sure you know that the UK abolished slavery 60 years before that.

You wrote "news of the of the Emancipation Proclamation reached the people of Galveston"

at a time when slaves were not considered quite human surely?

I think we are allowed to have a giggle about the typographical error and not be po-faced about the subject.

Edited by spacecadet
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Sorry, but making fun of Texans didn't strike me as very funny. Still doesn't. Not my kind of humor (humour).

 

Paulette

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9 hours ago, spacecadet said:

the UK abolished slavery 60 years before that.

I didn't find out about Somerset v. Stewart until around 2005 or so -- the UK was ahead of the US on abolition and the Southern Slave owning colonies weren't as concerned about taxes as not being able to take their slaves to London with them without the court ruling the formerly enslaved people to be free.

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