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45 minutes ago, Keith Douglas said:

 

Thanks for that Betty, You have some fantastic pictures.

A high percentage of your portfolio is not specific to any particular region so you should do as well in the UK as you do in the USA. However, when I looked at recent sales on P4ME, the majority are of locations or things in the UK. Perhaps there's another POD outlet in the UK with a better fit for your art? 

 

Keith

I don’t know of those sites, if there are. Since P4M began overhauling the site, I see what the search terms are, and yes, they seem to be UK locations. Not often do you see searches for anything my images would fit into. I did a little flurry of uploading recently, then watched what has sold and the search terms used and again feel I’m wasting my energy.

I think Fine Art America has better world-wide opportunity for people. I know of Europeans who do amazingly well there. P4M isn’t strong on marketing world-wide, it seems. Somewhat incestuous...🤣 not meant in a nasty way. Meaning: “of human relations generally, excessively close and resistant to outside influences.”  Maybe exclusive buyers is a better word. 
 

It's working for you, though, and that’s always a good thing.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I've dabbled in watercolours for the last 20 (wow, really!) years.

 

I've never sold any, but I enjoy doing them for my own pleasure. 

 

Only got a few on Alamy, notably:

 

original-watercolour-landscape-painting-by-the-artist-john-keates-D71Y1J.jpg

 

original-watercolour-landscape-painting-by-the-artist-john-keates-D71XYC.jpg

 

 

a-watercolour-painting-on-a-table-easel-with-a-palette-brushes-and-DX67M1.jpg

 

The one below is the finished painting.

 

As you can see I use tubes squeezed into pans on a palette. I use rough paper which gives a great texture to certain grainy paints like French Ultramarine.

 

original-watercolour-landscape-painting-by-the-artist-john-keates-D71Y0K.jpg

 

I haven't picked up my brushes for 18 months, will have to give them a try again.

 

John.

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4 minutes ago, Stokie said:

I've dabbled in watercolours for the last 20 (wow, really!) years.

 

I've never sold any, but I enjoy doing them for my own pleasure. 

 

Only got a few on Alamy, notably:

 

original-watercolour-landscape-painting-by-the-artist-john-keates-D71Y1J.jpg

 

original-watercolour-landscape-painting-by-the-artist-john-keates-D71XYC.jpg

 

 

a-watercolour-painting-on-a-table-easel-with-a-palette-brushes-and-DX67M1.jpg

 

The one below is the finished painting.

 

As you can see I use tubes squeezed into pans on a palette. I use rough paper which gives a great texture to certain grainy paints like French Ultramarine.

 

original-watercolour-landscape-painting-by-the-artist-john-keates-D71Y0K.jpg

 

I haven't picked up my brushes for 18 months, will have to give them a try again.

 

John.

John, very nice. Trees and simple shapes remind me of chinese brush painting...

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1 minute ago, Steve F said:

John, very nice. Trees and simple shapes remind me of chinese brush painting...

 Even though I have been painting for 20 years, my style is still a little naive!

 

John.

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13 minutes ago, Stokie said:

 Even though I have been painting for 20 years, my style is still a little naive!

 

John.

Not sure what a naive style is 🙃 Everyone has their own style. I personally try to learn new things, but I find my style doesn't change too much over the years.... I'm trying to show more dramatic light and shade now and more interesting skies (except my last client wanted a totally cloudless sky!) Maybe we should force ourselves to try doing paintings in the style of.... but we all like what we do, so...

 

Steve

 

p.s. But if you haven't tried chinese brush painting, look it up, it might be right up your street. Very graphic and often lots of negative space. I have dabbled a bit over the years. I've given up on using rice paper for painting on though, it's just too absorbent, any excess water on your brush and you're suddenly looking at a massive blob in front of you. Just use ordinary watercolour paper now, don't care if it looks 'authentic' or not.

Edited by Steve F
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2 hours ago, Stokie said:

I've dabbled in watercolours for the last 20 (wow, really!) years.

 

I've never sold any, but I enjoy doing them for my own pleasure. 

 

Only got a few on Alamy, notably:

 

original-watercolour-landscape-painting-by-the-artist-john-keates-D71Y1J.jpg

 

original-watercolour-landscape-painting-by-the-artist-john-keates-D71XYC.jpg

 

 

a-watercolour-painting-on-a-table-easel-with-a-palette-brushes-and-DX67M1.jpg

 

The one below is the finished painting.

 

As you can see I use tubes squeezed into pans on a palette. I use rough paper which gives a great texture to certain grainy paints like French Ultramarine.

 

original-watercolour-landscape-painting-by-the-artist-john-keates-D71Y0K.jpg

 

I haven't picked up my brushes for 18 months, will have to give them a try again.

 

John.

 

I love these.  Love the mix of hard and soft edges.  Beautiful countryside scenes. Well done!

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John, you paint in a style that touches a chord in me. I really like your work. Somewhat of a loose realism.  I do similar work these days.  When I say similar, though, no two painters paint alike.

When I first started years ago, I painted somewhat tighter. I left it for years, and starting over, I seem to prefer to paint in a looser style. Not saying I don’t like tighter watercolors, I do, and admire people who have that kind of patience.

With me, the object isn’t to make it look like a photo with all of the detail, but a suggestion of the scene done where I can easily tell the subject but deliver it in a more suggestive way. And sometimes, when slapping on watery paint and letting it run, wonderful things happen. Other times, I tear it up or flip the paper over to start again.

And I don’t necessarily stick to realism in the color palette, but take colorful liberties with it.

A few weeks ago, I took a photo at sunset. The glow in the sky was a light shade of purple. Rare to see, and in a painting, an observer would say the artist took artistic liberty. But not necessarily!

The thing is…we can if we want to.

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3 hours ago, Sally R said:

 

I love these John! They have a distinctive style. I like the mix of colours too. I also like the little details such as the tree shadow on the white wall in the last one. The rough textured paper really works and adds to a kind of rustic feel. I am no good at drawing or painting so I admire anyone who can see a scene and recreate it. 

 

2 hours ago, Michael Ventura said:

 

I love these.  Love the mix of hard and soft edges.  Beautiful countryside scenes. Well done!

 

Thanks for your kind comments.

 

I'll have to get the brushes out again!

 

John.

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  • 2 weeks later...

 

Yep. I was both a photography and painting major in art school then university. And have been a visual artist and writer ever since. 

 

My fine art portfolio: KIMBA.COM

Edited by kimba
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A lot of very talented people on this forum.  When I retire from my business, I hope to do some more art.  Did a lot of pencil sketching way back (horses mostly) and should return to it.

 

Jill

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1 hour ago, Jill Morgan said:

A lot of very talented people on this forum.  When I retire from my business, I hope to do some more art.  Did a lot of pencil sketching way back (horses mostly) and should return to it.

 

Jill

You should if you can. Being creative is good for us and just like with vegetables, a variety is better than a monotonous diet.

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I still have a half-finished novel somewhere. I abandoned it when I underwent breast cancer treatment, (during I designed and made jewelry) and after treatment I got into photography. Watercolor painting bookended those endeavors.

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Occasional stained glass. We have it in the house so it's mostly been like-for-like repairs, but last year I did a bit of freehand on some old broken panels in the garage (yes, we have leaded lights in the garage!) and a new house number for the gatepost. I probably posted it here at the time.

DSC04218.jpg

 

That dark green colour in the '9' is actually teal and the new glass still matches the 1907 original. I guess stained glass can't change colour very often otherwise how could you do an invisible repair on 13th. century panels?;)

Edited by spacecadet
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3 hours ago, spacecadet said:

Occasional stained glass. We have it in the house so it's mostly been like-for-like repairs, but last year I did a bit of freehand on some old broken panels in the garage (yes, we have leaded lights in the garage!) and a new house number for the gatepost. I probably posted it here at the time.

DSC04218.jpg

 

That dark green colour in the '9' is actually teal and the new glass still matches the 1907 original. I guess stained glass can't change colour very often otherwise how could you do an invisible repair on 13th. century panels?;)

Like the old, weathered wood, too.

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