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47 minutes ago, gvallee said:

I only do digital type of art. I can't show you easily, they are all over the place on my hard drive.

I have a few Out of Frame composites on Alamy. They have never sold but are a lot of fun to make.

 

GJ3HNE.jpg

 

R1D8MX.jpg

 

M5RE16.jpg

 

GJ3HN5.jpg

 

 

These are great - especially the kangaroo. There must be a market for this kind of thing, but it is hard to know where. That's the problem with art.

 

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7 minutes ago, Phil Robinson said:

These are great - especially the kangaroo. There must be a market for this kind of thing, but it is hard to know where. That's the problem with art.

 

 

Thanks Phil. I actually redid the roo to give the puddle the shape of Australia as an afterthought. 

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25 minutes ago, gvallee said:

 

Thanks Phil. I actually redid the roo to give the puddle the shape of Australia as an afterthought. 

You'd think that one would have real potential as a generic 'Australia' image for tourism. But, like the other 255m images, someone has to find it first...

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This is proving to be an interesting thread.

 

a-lone-figure-walking-barefoot-on-a-beac

 

I've not done any fantasy images in ages. But back in film days, when I was traveling a lot, I did some by sandwiching slides. I would sit at my coffee-table size lightbox and put images together. I had created a sci-fi book with long, descriptive captions. The image above might be the only one I have left of that group. Those circle, as some of you must know, were made by using a 500mm mirror tele.

 

Thyrsis's pottery is a good reminder that there are other areas of creativity besides visual art. I drew and painted as a child, was an actor and a writer. And I visited the music world three times -- as a jazz player in my teens, a folk singer later on, and finally as a composer trying to get involved with film scores. All that is long past now.  

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15 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

This is proving to be an interesting thread.

 

a-lone-figure-walking-barefoot-on-a-beac

 

I've not done any fantasy images in ages. But back in film days, when I was traveling a lot, I did some by sandwiching slides. I would sit at my coffee-table size lightbox and put images together. I had created a sci-fi book with long, descriptive captions. The image above might be the only one I have left of that group. Those circle, as some of you must know, were made by using a 500mm mirror tele.

 

Thyrsis's pottery is a good reminder that there are other areas of creativity besides visual art. I drew and painted as a child, was an actor and a writer. And I visited the music world three times -- as a jazz player in my teens, a folk singer later on, and finally as a composer trying to get involved with film scores. All that is long past now.  

 

Wow! What a great varied fulfilled life. 

I had one of those 500mm mirror lenses and its circles of confusion. 

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29 minutes ago, Phil Robinson said:

You'd think that one would have real potential as a generic 'Australia' image for tourism. But, like the other 255m images, someone has to find it first...

 

Just in case, I've just added 'tourism' and 'travel' in the tags. Thank you for prompting me.

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38 minutes ago, gvallee said:

 

I had one of those 500mm mirror lenses and its circles of confusion. 

 

 

I've still got mine. Tamron SP500. I've been meaning to do something creative with it for years but never seem to get a round tuit.

 

Alan

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2 hours ago, Steve F said:

 

Alan, make sure to take photos along the way as well as for the finished article. It's fun to see the stages.

 

I've been doing this when I remember, Steve, but more for Facebook than for stock. The room is so small and cramped it's difficult to frame pics in a pleasing way, and I always look incredibly scruffy!

 

Alan

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Just now, Inchiquin said:

 

I've been doing this when I remember, Steve, but more for Facebook than for stock. The room is so small and cramped it's difficult to frame pics in a pleasing way, and I always look incredibly scruffy!

 

Alan

Ha ha, ditto, need to remember to put old clothes on when painting. Yeah I don't use them for stock, just Facebook too.

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The guitar I last enjoyed playing blew up one night on my wall in NYC. It was a Japanese-made classical that I played finger style. Over time, I bought two others to replace it but for some odd reason I hated both. In my NYC flat, I left three other guitars, a box of Irish penny whistles, two keyboard synths, and countless other things.

 

Looking back, my most important contribution to music was that I once fixed the film composer, John Williams, a cup of instant coffee. He was a Juilliard student then with lots of black hair and working a gig that day as a rehearsal pianist for a vocal group led by Dave Lambert. I think we were using Miles Davis's apartment. That was 1953 or '54. Name-dropping? Oh, I can do that. 

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Commissions for classical compositions have moved from the Church and Royalty to film scores. 

 

My older half-sister lived in the same building as Miles -- 881 Tenth Avenue. I knew him before he lost his voice. 

 

I had a Korg M1. 

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8 hours ago, gvallee said:

 

Wow! What a great varied fulfilled life. 

I had one of those 500mm mirror lenses and its circles of confusion. 

 

I had a Tamron 500 mirror lens (catadioptric) that I used to tote around Mexico and Central America. When I scanned my old slides for Alamy, I couldn't find one image taken with this lens that was sharp enough for Alamy. Also, focusing the lens drove me crazy. I used to get sore wrist muscles turning the focusing ring back and forth.

 

I guess that I don't do art. In fact, I'm not even sure what art is. However, some imaginative images have been posted on this thread.

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3 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

Looking back, my most important contribution to music was that I once fixed the film composer, John Williams, a cup of instant coffee.

 

 

I think I can match that. My most important contribution to music was that I took a photo of my sister's boyfriend who was the engineer who twiddled the knobs of the phaser on Status Quo's "Pictures of Matchstick Men", and whose punk band later had an entry in the UK heat of the Eurovision Song Contest.

 

Alan

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On 15/05/2021 at 19:37, Betty LaRue said:

To get this topic out of the iMac thread, and to explore art in all forms besides photographs.

What do you do? I have seen beautiful art carved from wood, working with clay making bowls, things made from molten glass. All of it art.

Then, there is digital art. Some from scratch, some started as photographs but were changed in artistic ways.

 

Then there is painting. Acrylics, watercolor, oils. And mixed media, like watercolor and ink, or using combos of paint and things like paper, burlap, other fabrics.

 

Do you partake?

I do watercolor, watercolor and ink, and I do artistic things to photographs.

 

This was a photograph taken during a parade. The use of a texture obliterated the crowd in the background, only showing a hint of the cowboy driving the wagon.

https://fineartamerica.com/featured/giddyup-betty-larue.html

If you have links, put them here. If you have images on Alamy or a hosting site, let’s see them.

I wish I could! I love going to galleries and appreciating the work of others but much to my shame I failed my art O level! 😞

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Great topic Betty.

 

I classify these images as Photo Illustration. Alamy should have a third classification in addition to photo and illustration.

 

 

0-and-1-digital-data-stored-in-the-matri

 

The above is a stock photo illustration of where data goes to die. It was purchased as wall decor, from a stock photo agency, for the research labs at IBM.

The image was created entirely in a 3D computer program called Bryce around 1995. No camera touched this image. It is a 360 degree image, you can tell by the lighting.

 

------------------

 

photo-illustration-made-to-look-like-an-

 

The origin of this image was an old 400MM shot on film. The colour, noise, fuzziness, and the black dog of depression were created in Photoshop. The original film shot was a view from our apartment circa 1972.

 

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Posted (edited)

I love everything posted here. And John, describing art is illusive. Fine art photography is art, but I wanted to see what other things people here do. I’m tickled at the pottery posting, because native people all over the  world have done beautiful pottery, and some of it is worth a fortune.

What one person considers art, another might argue with that. I used to hate abstract art. The older I get, the more I like it. I do prefer art that I can tell what the subject is, however loosely it’s rendered, though. But I no longer hate abstract art. Some of it is beautiful.

This one is a photograph I took years ago. I was sitting on my patio with my 80-400 lens mounted on my Nikon. Focusing on birds, of course. A rain shower came. There was a Rose of Sharon bush just over the fence, but tall. It was just 8 feet away, if that. The rain stopped, and the setting sun sent rays through this flower, with the Monarch butterfly silhouetted in it. I actually gasped. Swung my camera around and got it. The texture I applied just added beauty, and took out a busy background, making the flower and butterfly the star.

https://fineartamerica.com/featured/beautiful-in-pink-betty-larue.html

My desire for art got strong when I was 17. Married, with a baby girl. The Air Force paid nothing, and I pinched every penny twice. There was this little store in the small town where we lived, a few miles from the airbase. I, with Debbie on my hip, browsed the very meager art supplies. They had nothing of quality, but I couldn’t have bought it if they had.  I knew nothing about painting but wanted to so bad I could taste it. I saved enough over time to buy a small paint-by-number kit. It was of a cocker spaniel dog. I loved doing it but was aware there was more, better out there, and was unsatisfied.

I did nothing else (busy raising 3 kids and too poor) until I was in my mid-30s, when I got a job and finally had some discretionary money to spend. Those years I had a guitar, played and sang some. Painted, sold, took pictures, won a few photography contests.

Later, began writing, and joined a writer’s club. I wrote some winning short stories, got an article & photos published in a glossy mag. Started a thriller novel.

When I got cancer, I had too much chemo brain fog to write. Lost interest.  I designed and made jewelry to keep my mind off how I felt. Sold it!!! Mainly to the many people who worked at the hospital & Cancer Care. I produced jewelry for my nurse’s wedding, for her & her bridesmaids.

When I finished treatment, I bought my first Nikon camera and here I am. After my husband passed, I got back into watercolor and feel like I’m starting all over again.

I still don’t understand technology, but MDM is striving to educate me. It’s hard, because I was standing behind the post when that talent was handed out. I popped out for cooking, hid again for sewing. I didn’t realize when I was behind the post when technical ability was handed out, that included settings and adjustments on a sewing machine. 😄

Edited by Betty LaRue
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I've done some painting with Chinese inks and brushes, and some ray-tracing which were more abstract than not. 

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We have just sold 3 of Ian's pots for more than the total we made on Alamy in the last year! 

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12 hours ago, Thyrsis said:

We have just sold 3 of Ian's pots for more than the total we made on Alamy in the last year! 

That is absolutely wonderful! How exciting. Now you need to take it up, too!

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

That is absolutely wonderful! How exciting. Now you need to take it up, too!

I couldn’t compete Betty, we’re chalk and cheese! He’s methodical and and I’m more slapdash. And if I manage to make something I always want to keep it! 

 

PS. There are a few videos of him working on You Tube, search Ian Fraser Ceramics. 

Edited by Thyrsis
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Wow some super stuff in this thread. In my case the following applies "A man's got to know his limitations" !

 

My dad could draw and our younger son has the knack, but the gene skipped a generation ..........

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On 19/05/2021 at 00:09, Thyrsis said:

I couldn’t compete Betty, we’re chalk and cheese! He’s methodical and and I’m more slapdash. And if I manage to make something I always want to keep it! 

 

PS. There are a few videos of him working on You Tube, search Ian Fraser Ceramics. 

We must be kindred spirits, then. While Steve has the patience for beautiful detail in his paintings, I tend to throw watercolors at the paper, let them run and see what happens. Often it’s mud, but once in awhile something turns into a painting. Kind of impressionist.

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