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19 hours ago, Sally R said:

 

I especially love the clarity and dynamic range in the monochrome images Alan. I feel like I am in that last one walking behind the guy on the railway platform. I would love a Q. I'm sure it makes you think differently and creatively too when out taking photos.

Thanks Sally, yes the sharpness of the Leica lens and the Q produce excellent clarity and dynamic range when converting to B&W in lightroom but so does the D5 or D850. Its about selecting the right image that would look better in B&W rather than in colour. I cannot say that I think differently when using the Q other than with the fixed 28mm lens you move more to get the image rather than change the focal length with a zoom. One thing about the Q is that you are less conspicuous especially for example the train station platform image.

 

Alan

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9 hours ago, gvallee said:

 

Thank you Betty. Some motorhomes also look like that with their elevated roof LOL!!

I guess you probably know but this bird can kill you. Dad incubates the blueish/greenish eggs clutch, mum has nothing to do with it. Dad is rather protective. Never approach a cassowary with chicks! He will rip you open with his claw.

No, I didn’t know that, Gen.  How big is a cassowary? They must be pretty big if they can kill you. There’s nothing else in the image to give me a size reference. When I was 8, I was attacked by a chicken rooster, and that was bad enough. I made the mistake of stepping into what it claimed as its territory while trying to take clothes off the clothesline. He flogged my legs, and when I reached down to push him away, he latched onto my arm with his claws and flogged my face.

One of the scariest things that happened to me and I had welts and deep scratches.

Oh, wait. A close second was the gander that chased me across the barnyard and bit me hard enough on my calf to leave a big bruise. Same age. 
Then there was the hen that jumped up and ripped a huge scab off of my knee from a bike accident. Gushing blood, yuk.  Living on a farm for 18 months was dangerous. 😁
Now tell me why I love birds? I must be nuts.

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2 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

How big is a cassowary?

Wikipedia says of them: "Adult southern cassowaries are 1.5 to 1.8 m (5–6 ft) tall, although some females may reach 2 m (6.6 ft), and weigh 58.5 kg (130 lb)."  So as tall as humans, but lighter.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cassowary  

 

This is a short YouTube video on cassowaries:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1zZcXERIMVA

 

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5 hours ago, MizBrown said:

Wikipedia says of them: "Adult southern cassowaries are 1.5 to 1.8 m (5–6 ft) tall, although some females may reach 2 m (6.6 ft), and weigh 58.5 kg (130 lb)."  So as tall as humans, but lighter.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cassowary  

 

This is a short YouTube video on cassowaries:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1zZcXERIMVA

 

 

Yes, it's the size of an emu, a small ostrich. Its claw is formidable and can rip your belly open.

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On 26/04/2021 at 20:13, gvallee said:

Some Australian wildlife. Andy's shark is far more scary!

 

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Really like your images Gen,

 

I admire you eye.

 

Chuck

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6 minutes ago, Chuck Nacke said:

Really like your images Gen,

 

I admire you eye.

 

Chuck

 

Thank you Chuck. The least best kept secret is that you have to capture animals while they are doing something. That's a challenge. I like challenges.

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1 minute ago, gvallee said:

 

Thank you Chuck. The least best kept secret is that you have to capture animals while they are doing something. That's a challenge. I like challenges.

Gen,

 

Sort of like people... LOL, but they are usually not doing anything natural and they are more easy to "capture"......

 

Chuck

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I massaged this one to get it to size, but I'd taken the photo with a very good lens (Nikon Micro 105mm f/2.8 VR) and decided to try it.   I probably need to get back to the Virginia Falconry Association and get the man's name as he was well known by the other members and also flew Golden Eagles.  The bird is a juvenile Red-tailed female hawk who was rather aggressive (note the glasses and the stick).  The typical thing people to is work with birds of the year who are flying and hunting, but who aren't so good at hunting that they fail to appreciate a bit of help with the first year.  Most of them are released after molting into adult plumage, which with Red-tailed hawks involves getting the red tail.   They're one of two birds that an apprentice falconer in the US outside Alaska could work with when I looked into the sport (in Alaska, apprentices could work with goshawks).

 

falconer-with-juvenile-red-tailed-hawk-b

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Wow, you people get to see a lot of wildlife. Since I've been in Liverpool, I've only encountered Herring gulls, pigeons, and Scousers. 

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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

Wow, you people get to see a lot of wildlife. Since I've been in Liverpool, I've only encountered Herring gulls, pigeons, and Scousers. 

 

We have to make an effort to see them mostly. Except if like me, one drives a vehicle with a stone guard. At the end of a day driving, we had a complete zoo: butterflies of various species, crickets, beetles, dragonflies. Then when we stopped, came hungry birds for the bounty.

 

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