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22 hours ago, Jill Morgan said:

I explained that we weren't taking their photos, we were focused on moving cars so I could choose which lens I wanted. 

 

My reply is less to do with being harassed (and I've had my fair share in 40 years of professional photography), and more to do with your choice of subject to test lens sharpness. There are too many variables involved in getting a sharp image with moving objects, and I would not recommend shooting them to test image sharpness.

Put the camera on a tripod (especially when testing a long lens), use remote release and shoot static objects at a reasonable distance at varying apertures. That should give you the best test results.  

Edited by Steve Valentia
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49 minutes ago, Steve Valentia said:

use remote release and shoot static objects at a reasonable distance at varying apertures

Good advice, maybe also use a 2 second delay on the shutter and choose a subject with detail right to the corners. You'll presumably want to go right through the aperture range so consistent light (a clear sunny day say) is best. Usually on a tripod you need to switch IS off.

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14 minutes ago, Harry Harrison said:

...maybe also use a 2 second delay on the shutter...

It shouldn't be necessary with a remote release attached, but essential if not. I would also lock the mirror up, if the light is low and the camera has that facility.

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2 hours ago, Steve Valentia said:

 

My reply is less to do with being harassed (and I've had my fair share in 40 years of professional photography), and more to do with your choice of subject to test lens sharpness. There are too many variables involved in getting a sharp image with moving objects, and I would not recommend shooting them to test image sharpness.

Put the camera on a tripod (especially when testing a long lens), use remote release and shoot static objects at a reasonable distance at varying apertures. That should give you the best test results.  

 

I had taken static shots (hand held), but since the majority purpose of the lens was to be hand held shooting moving objects, I needed to see how it performed under those conditions. I didn't take my static shots on a tripod, but the images were great static (even in corners, I checked) but hand held was the test, and it performed beautifully.

 

Jill

 

 

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16 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

When shooting birds, set your focus box to the smallest one. Probably in the menu. Set single point, not one that’s for judging the whole picture. Realize that your exposure will be based on where that focus box is, so the exposure can change depending on the lightness or darkness of your single spot reading because the camera is no longer evaluating exposure across the whole image. This is all instinctive for me because I’ve shot birds since starting out. Set your small focus box on the bird’s eye. Alamy will look for that to be the sharpest point of the image. Be ready, while focusing on the bird’s eye, to manually adjust exposure. 

I look, focus, and have my histogram showing. Then I’ll adjust shutter-speed, aperture, my exposure compensation dial or last, my ISO until the histogram looks good. Usually once I’ve done that I’m good for other bird shots in the same area at those settings. It will change from shade to sun, though. For birds, 250 Shutterspeed is the lowest I go. If the day is bright. Use the fastest you can. Those little balls of fluff move fast..sometimes just their heads.

Now get out there and kill it!

 

I was using single point focus, it was just hard to keep the camera on the bird as I had slightly sprained my right wrist in the morning, so holding a camera pointing upward, fully extended was hard.  The branch that was in focus was just to the right and behind the bird. They do move quick.

 

I'm sure with practice I'll get it good and steady.  May keep it on a tripod and use the tripod as a monopod.  I had shutter at 1/1000 at f/8.  ISO 200.  When I tested it I was shooting straight forward ahead of me (and wrist was fine).  The looking up was the strain.  I'm very determined, so will get there.  Now even considering upgrading to a Caon 80D or 90D camera.  Used of course.

 

Jill

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21 minutes ago, Jill Morgan said:

 

I had taken static shots (hand held), but since the majority purpose of the lens was to be hand held shooting moving objects, I needed to see how it performed under those conditions. I didn't take my static shots on a tripod, but the images were great static (even in corners, I checked) but hand held was the test, and it performed beautifully.

 

Jill

 

 

 

The factors that determine how sharp hand held moving object shots are not related to the sharpness of the lens. If it's sharp with static images, it's sharp for moving images. The way you hold the camera, the shutter speed you set, if the object is moving towards you or across the plane of focus and whether you are good at panning are the things that make moving objects shots sharp - or not.

Edited by Steve Valentia
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3 minutes ago, Steve Valentia said:

 

The factors that determine how sharp hand held moving object shots are not related to the sharpness of the lens. If it's sharp with static images, it's sharp for moving images. The way you hold the camera, the shutter speed you set, if the object is moving towards you or across the plane of focus and whether you are good at panning are the things that make moving objects shots sharp - or not.

 

That is why I tested it both ways.  Once satisfied with static, I needed a field test.  Since it was a used lens, I needed to know that the Image Stabilization on panning was operating as it should.  Very pleased with the lens performance.  Now just need all the birds to return from the south.  Bears will start coming out of hibernation next month, so will try to grab a few shots from a safe distance.

 

Jill

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29 minutes ago, Chuck Nacke said:

This thread is further proof of the "Proper Use" of a Monopod.

 

FYI only 50% serious....

 

Chuck

 

Haha! I can think of a couple of buttons one could wear. 😂

No much use outside of the US I'm afraid.

 

wim

 

edit: Maybe I should have looked for face masks first. Who wears buttons right.

Edited by wiskerke
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1 hour ago, Jill Morgan said:

May keep it on a tripod and use the tripod as a monopod

 

I suggest looking at the Wimberley Sidekick and the full Wimberly gimbal head.  If you've got a bird feeder as a lure, have some places for birds to perch near the feeder and with full view of the camera.  Some birds like to check out who else is at the feeder.  Also, a monopod is better than a tripod that you're trying to use as a monopod.  I've got an overly fancy one which is too heavy to use easily, recommend just a plain vanilla one with a monopod head with a clamp. 

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I done quite a bit of bird photography over the years and used to use an extremely good Gitzo tripod with a Wimberley head both of which I still have, this was when I had my very heavy 200-400mm F4.  It was useful when I used it at home for the birds on the feeder.  Apart from that I found it far easier to use it handheld which I did most of the time when out and about.  The tripod I found cumbersome to move around quickly and therefore found myself missing a lot of shots.  It was a very heavy lens but whilst concentrating on the birds somehow I forgot about the weight of it, until of course I got home😁.  I've never got on with monopods but horses for courses, whatever works for you.  I think you will get used to the weight of the lens quite quickly and may find it even helps.  All good tips above, focus on the eye/single point focus etc.  Know how to change the settings on your camera very quickly also😁.  Enjoy......

 

Carol

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4 hours ago, Jill Morgan said:

 

I was using single point focus, it was just hard to keep the camera on the bird as I had slightly sprained my right wrist in the morning, so holding a camera pointing upward, fully extended was hard.  The branch that was in focus was just to the right and behind the bird. They do move quick.

 

I'm sure with practice I'll get it good and steady.  May keep it on a tripod and use the tripod as a monopod.  I had shutter at 1/1000 at f/8.  ISO 200.  When I tested it I was shooting straight forward ahead of me (and wrist was fine).  The looking up was the strain.  I'm very determined, so will get there.  Now even considering upgrading to a Caon 80D or 90D camera.  Used of course.

 

Jill

When shooting my 80-400 lens on Nikon, I always used a monopod. I couldn’t hold that heavy lens steady enough without. My monopod allowed me to move it and follow the bird, plus it saved hand/wrist/arm fatigue from trying to hand hold it. I would rest the camera in my lap while waiting for a bird to land, and often by the time I lifted it to my eye, the bird was gone.

Finding a head that allows quick adjustments isn’t easy. Mine is quick release, and has a squeeze thingy to adjust with. But it also is weak enough to suffer a bit of drop after letting go of the squeeze part.

Yet its the only type that makes sense and does what I need it to do...instantly.

 

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On 10/03/2021 at 10:01, Jill Morgan said:

Yes, it was stressful, but you tell the sales person had dealt with this many times. 

 

I was wondering why they were so stressed at having their pictures taken.  You wonder if there is some story behind that.  

 

Jill

Sorry about your bad experience in the Big Smoke, Jill. 

I'm thinking of some TO camera stores along Queen St E, that are in somewhat sketchy neighborhoods.  You never know who you will run across.  You handled it well.

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20 minutes ago, Reimar said:

Sorry about your bad experience in the Big Smoke, Jill. 

I'm thinking of some TO camera stores along Queen St E, that are in somewhat sketchy neighborhoods.  You never know who you will run across.  You handled it well.

 

Yes, I was outside Downtown Camera which is also around the corner from Henry's.  I love going to T.O., used to live right on the Lake way back in the early 80's.

 

Jill

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6 hours ago, wiskerke said:

 

Haha! I can think of a couple of buttons one could wear. 😂

No much use outside of the US I'm afraid.

 

wim

 

edit: Maybe I should have looked for face masks first. Who wears buttons right.

Not into Buttons Wim,

 

But I still do my daily 300 pushups,  we old Norman users need to stay strong.......

 

Chuck

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  • 1 month later...

I have been dealing with this issue for years because I am willing to do politics and social unrest in the United States. The most likely thing to be a problem are children in the background of a photo with parents wailing and moaning about pedophiles. I usually wear an NPPA press tag and my response is usually "You can call the police if you think a crime has been committed." Do not argue with the public about the legality or ethics of photography. It is over their heads.

Dealing with police is a different situation and I am only using the United States as an example. Always know exactly where you are standing and if you have a right to be there. Always use a camera with a GPS function turned on. If you are using a DSLR camera have a cell phone ready to record any hostile interactions if necessary. Always be prepared to identify yourself to police. Where a identification tag if you have one. An NPPA tag basically tell the police that you are probably in the business and probably can afford a lawyer.

Police will go very easy things to make an arrest for. Trespassing (that is why you use the GPS function), interference with an official act, or disturbing the peace.

At one time there was also a tendency for people to report photographers as suspected terrorists both in the United States and the UK.

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14 hours ago, Keith Turrill said:

Police will go very easy things to make an arrest for. Trespassing

You did limit yourself to the US, but just to add that in the UK, mainland Europe, and I believe generally outside the US, trespass is very rarely a criminal offence, and certainly not in the circumstances a photographer is likely to find himself in..

Edited by spacecadet
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I was covering a protest against the curfew for a newspaper here in Montreal, and it turned ugly. The mob started insulting a TV camera crew about spreading "fake News". One cameraman got pushed around but kept his cool....the reporter and cameraman calmly walked away. I was asked several times if I was working for the media....to which I replied no...I said I just happened to be there.....they didn't bother me. As for the police.....when they start clearing the streets....they don't really care if you are working press. When the adrenaline is flowing through their veins....they can get pretty cranked up. Once I had my press cards in full view with two camera bodies with me and I still got a push and a slap in the face for not clearing out. If you find yourself in a similar situation....my best advice.....keep your cool. If it gets to rough, just leave. Depending on the crowd, remember your outnumbered 10 to 1.Stay safe!

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I had an incident in Helsinki about week ago. I was taking couple of pics of an ice cream truck or van, when the vendor (the ice cream man himself) started to shout at me. Actually he told me to f**k off. I went over to ask what was his problem was and he started ranting and raving about how I follow him with my camera. Some paranoid stuff. I told him, quite politely, that he was wrong and mentioned that taking pictures in a public place is my constitutional right. That had little or no effect on him. So I told him to stop scaring the kids (standing in the line) and left. For some reason, this conversation was all in English - I guess the vendor was originally from Britain.

 

Angry public is part of street photography, I can take it, but it leaves a bad taste in your mouth. 

Edited by JaniMarkus Hasa
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10 hours ago, spacecadet said:

trespass is very rarely a criminal offence

You're correct, trespass is not a criminal offence in the UK - YET. But there are plans afoot to make it so - ostensibly to deal with the

"problem" of Travellers. But my level of trust in this Government is so low, there is a real chance of "mission creep" with everything they do.

 

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4 hours ago, Russell said:

You're correct, trespass is not a criminal offence in the UK - YET. But there are plans afoot to make it so - ostensibly to deal with the

"problem" of Travellers. But my level of trust in this Government is so low, there is a real chance of "mission creep" with everything they do.

 

 

Just to clarify - the proposals apply to England and Wales only.  There is no law of trespass in Scotland and, as far as I'm aware, there are no plans to change that.

 

https://www.thebmc.co.uk/law-of-trespass-could-change

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19 hours ago, Vincent Lowe said:

 

Just to clarify - the proposals apply to England and Wales only.  There is no law of trespass in Scotland and, as far as I'm aware, there are no plans to change that.

 

https://www.thebmc.co.uk/law-of-trespass-could-change

Yes, luckily there is a very different view here. I was recently told by a farmer that I was free to roam his fields with sheep in them as long as I closed the gates.

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I had similar experience few years back when I went to a local zoo with my family which is a public place. I was recently shifted to this place in India. I had a telephoto lense and prime lens for my dslr. Me and my father were resting under a shed. My mother and wife went to washroom and were coming back to us from the distance so I wanted to take their photos of  walking towards us while some zoo wild animals behind them. I didn't realise that a group of adult girls were enjoying in the swing in between And my camera was directed towards them as my family was walking far behind them in same axis. 

Suddenly one guy who was friend of those girls came to me and started shouting at me that how I could take those girls pix. I was shocked as I didn't even realise what's the matter. I tried to convince him that I was not taking photo of girls but he was already mad at me. Then I had to show him images of my mother and wife walking in my camera and finally he calmed down as he didn't find images of those girls. Fhewww.. I then decided to pay attention to near by people and objects while taking photos and preferably take photo of  family and friends only when there are no other stranger around 

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