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I had my first encounter with people who didn't want their picture taken yesterday.  Funny thing was, I wasn't taking their picture.

 

I went into Toronto yesterday to buy my new lens.  I was debating between the Canon 100-400 f4.5/5.6 IS telephoto and the Canon 300 f4 IS prime.  The sales person and I went outside to test the two lenses. He shot with the prime and I shot with the telephoto.  We were testing them on continuous shots on cars going down the road, focusing on the license plate so I could check sharpness.

 

These two guys came running up asking why we were taking their photos.  I explained that we weren't taking their photos, we were focused on moving cars so I could choose which lens I wanted.  They got real mad, accusing us of taking their photos and wanted to see the photos on the cameras.  The stubborn part of me wanted to refuse on principle, as I had every right to take their photo if I wished as we were on a public sidewalk, but decided better to let them check the images as why create an issue when there wasn't one.

 

Satisfied, they left.

 

I decided on the 100-400 and plan to take it out today for a road test.

 

Jill

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That sounds a bit stressful Jill. I'm glad you were able to diffuse the situation. Sounds like you handled it well and calmed them down. Have fun with the new 100-400!

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Sorry to hear that, Jill. It can be extremely stressful and very distressing. Good move to diffuse the situation, but no, it shouldn't be necessary. Take care.

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Yes, it was stressful, but you tell the sales person had dealt with this many times. 

 

I was wondering why they were so stressed at having their pictures taken.  You wonder if there is some story behind that.  

 

Jill

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Very stressful. You don't mention social distancing or masking etc. which I would have thought would have made it worse than normal, or isn't that a concern in Toronto? The last thing I would want is angry strangers getting up close and personal at the moment.

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1 minute ago, Harry Harrison said:

Very stressful. You don't mention social distancing or masking etc. which I would have thought would have made it worse than normal, or isn't that a concern in Toronto? The last thing I would want is angry strangers getting up close and personal at the moment.

 

 

it should be an issue in Toronto it was actually my first thought when i saw the post.  Not sure i would have let them see the images, as i am not sure how this can be done keeping 2m distance, possibly made worse depending which of the photo shop it was at, at least two being on really busy sidewalks.  

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2 minutes ago, meanderingemu said:

it should be an issue in Toronto it was actually my first thought when i saw the post.  Not sure i would have let them see the images, as i am not sure how this can be done keeping 2m distance, possibly made worse depending which of the photo shop it was at, at least two being on really busy sidewalks. 

Thanks for the insight, sounds like the same as over here then.

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1 hour ago, Jill Morgan said:

I had my first encounter with people who didn't want their picture taken yesterday.  Funny thing was, I wasn't taking their picture.

 

I went into Toronto yesterday to buy my new lens.  I was debating between the Canon 100-400 f4.5/5.6 IS telephoto and the Canon 300 f4 IS prime.  The sales person and I went outside to test the two lenses. He shot with the prime and I shot with the telephoto.  We were testing them on continuous shots on cars going down the road, focusing on the license plate so I could check sharpness.

 

These two guys came running up asking why we were taking their photos.  I explained that we weren't taking their photos, we were focused on moving cars so I could choose which lens I wanted.  They got real mad, accusing us of taking their photos and wanted to see the photos on the cameras.  The stubborn part of me wanted to refuse on principle, as I had every right to take their photo if I wished as we were on a public sidewalk, but decided better to let them check the images as why create an issue when there wasn't one.

 

Satisfied, they left.

 

I decided on the 100-400 and plan to take it out today for a road test.

 

Jill

 

 

Had similar experience in Ottawa a couple of weeks ago, taking picture of the man  from a distance going down toboggan hill in a public park.  I picked him because i didn't want to focus on kids, but as he was coming down he started yelling "no,no,no.  you are not allowed to take my picture....  now you ruined my decent...*grumble,grumble" .  I just put camera down, and walked away.  

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11 minutes ago, Harry Harrison said:

Very stressful. You don't mention social distancing or masking etc. which I would have thought would have made it worse than normal, or isn't that a concern in Toronto? The last thing I would want is angry strangers getting up close and personal at the moment.

 

Everyone was social distanced.  Sidewalk wasn't very busy.  Everyone was masked and we showed pics with arms held out and they stood back.  All very covid protocol. In the store there was plexiglass everywhere.

 

Jill

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Jill,

Sounds rubbish. Seems it's not just people in the UK that are idiots sometimes. I hope they apologised.

 

It is something I think about a lot when I'm photographing in non-touristy areas. People get really funny about it sometimes.

Steve

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8 minutes ago, Jill Morgan said:

 

Everyone was social distanced.  Sidewalk wasn't very busy.  Everyone was masked and we showed pics with arms held out and they stood back.  All very covid protocol. In the store there was plexiglass everywhere.

 

Jill

 

good to know, but i am still curious why under these circumstances anyone would have made such a fuss.  maybe you are right, and they were hiding something worse making it worth risking their health for it.  

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Just now, Steve F said:

Jill,

Sounds rubbish. Seems it's not just people in the UK that are idiots sometimes. I hope they apologised.

 

It is something I think about a lot when I'm photographing in non-touristy areas. People get really funny about it sometimes.

Steve

 

 

i know we have rights to take the image, but let's remember this was using some pretty long lenses in a major urban environment, something even I wouldn't expect and find it odd if i saw that walking down my street.    This wasn't your typical street photography.  

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Just now, meanderingemu said:

 

 

i know we have rights to take the image, but let's remember this was using some pretty long lenses in a major urban environment, something even I wouldn't expect and find it odd if i saw that walking down my street.    This wasn't your typical street photography.  

 

We weren't walking down the street.  Standing in front of the camera store.  I think these guys had a reason they didn't want their photos taken.

 

Jill

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6 minutes ago, vpics said:

They wouldn't have blinked if it you had used an iPhone. Sad times.

 

 

Generally when doing street I use the Sony RX-100 II.  Very inobtrusive and looks like an little cheap point and shoot.  You look more like a tourist than a photographer.  Might be why I've never been bothered before.

 

Jill

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That's a real pain.  

 

Happened to me a few months ago and I was using the tiny RX100 shooting the outside seating area at Costa Coffee, there was no one sitting there but a group of lads were close by.  One of them came up to me and asked me  in an accent I could not identify why I was taking pictures of them, I said I wasn't.  My other half was close by and came over, the guy wandered off !  

 

Anyway I hope you enjoy your new lens ........

 

Carol

Edited by CAROL SAUNDERS
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4 minutes ago, CAROL SAUNDERS said:

That's a real pain.  

 

Happened to me a few months ago and I was using the tiny RX100 shooting the outside seating area at Costa Coffee, there was no one sitting there but a group of lads were close by.  One of them came up to me and asked me  in an accent I could identify why I was taking pictures of them, I said I wasn't.  My other half was close by and came over, the guy wandered off !  

 

Anyway I hope you enjoy your new lens ........

 

Carol

 

Had the lens out this morning.  Shot a couple of birds in a tree.  Have to practice my auto focus with such a heavy lens.  On all shots the birds were out of focus but the tree branch behind them was as sharp as a tack. At least at 400mm, I know it can get a sharp image, just have to get that focus in the right place.  

 

Jill

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1 hour ago, Jill Morgan said:

Everyone was social distanced.  Sidewalk wasn't very busy.  Everyone was masked and we showed pics with arms held out and they stood back.  All very covid protocol. In the store there was plexiglass everywhere.

Thanks, that's a relief. Socially distanced arguments.

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I had some muppet the other day.

 

"If you point that thing at me I'll.........."

 

Answer: 'Why would I point my camera at you?'

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I’ve come across a few idiots over the years. My approach varies depending upon theirs. The last instance was a few weeks back outside the Bucks New University NHS national vaccination centre. I was standing on a public pavement intending to photograph the signage when 3 security guards came running over blocking my view and told me the NHS said no one could take photos. I pointed out the law, and said the sooner they moved out of the way I would take my photos and be away. They weren’t very friendly so after warning them I photographed all 3, and their backs when they turned around. They then added that I couldn’t photograph them, I replied that I just had, and they should check with their supervisor before they looked even more of an idiot. I again informed them I was on public property and could photograph the signs, then left. To think the tax payer was paying idiots like that.

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55 minutes ago, sb photos said:

I’ve come across a few idiots over the years. My approach varies depending upon theirs. The last instance was a few weeks back outside the Bucks New University NHS national vaccination centre. I was standing on a public pavement intending to photograph the signage when 3 security guards came running over blocking my view and told me the NHS said no one could take photos. I pointed out the law, and said the sooner they moved out of the way I would take my photos and be away. They weren’t very friendly so after warning them I photographed all 3, and their backs when they turned around. They then added that I couldn’t photograph them, I replied that I just had, and they should check with their supervisor before they looked even more of an idiot. I again informed them I was on public property and could photograph the signs, then left. To think the tax payer was paying idiots like that.

Well done for standing your ground.  I detest idiots like that who think they can lay down the law. 😡

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3 hours ago, Jill Morgan said:

 

Had the lens out this morning.  Shot a couple of birds in a tree.  Have to practice my auto focus with such a heavy lens.  On all shots the birds were out of focus but the tree branch behind them was as sharp as a tack. At least at 400mm, I know it can get a sharp image, just have to get that focus in the right place.  

 

Jill

 

6 months on doing meandering bird photo, it is hard.   last week i sat at the end of day with tennis elbow from the lens.   

enjoy the new lens....

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5 hours ago, Jill Morgan said:

 

Had the lens out this morning.  Shot a couple of birds in a tree.  Have to practice my auto focus with such a heavy lens.  On all shots the birds were out of focus but the tree branch behind them was as sharp as a tack. At least at 400mm, I know it can get a sharp image, just have to get that focus in the right place.  

 

Jill

When shooting birds, set your focus box to the smallest one. Probably in the menu. Set single point, not one that’s for judging the whole picture. Realize that your exposure will be based on where that focus box is, so the exposure can change depending on the lightness or darkness of your single spot reading because the camera is no longer evaluating exposure across the whole image. This is all instinctive for me because I’ve shot birds since starting out. Set your small focus box on the bird’s eye. Alamy will look for that to be the sharpest point of the image. Be ready, while focusing on the bird’s eye, to manually adjust exposure. 

I look, focus, and have my histogram showing. Then I’ll adjust shutter-speed, aperture, my exposure compensation dial or last, my ISO until the histogram looks good. Usually once I’ve done that I’m good for other bird shots in the same area at those settings. It will change from shade to sun, though. For birds, 250 Shutterspeed is the lowest I go. If the day is bright. Use the fastest you can. Those little balls of fluff move fast..sometimes just their heads.

Now get out there and kill it!

Edited by Betty LaRue
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