Jump to content

Recommended Posts

2 minutes ago, John Mitchell said:

 

There are too many stories like yours out there. I also have some alarming ones to tell -- a sadistic elementary teacher in a small rural school that I attended, a popular science teacher in my high school who turned out to be pedophile, to name a couple. It's amazing how we survive our school years.

 

I am very glad to say I never had any direct experiences of pedophiles (paedophiles in the British English spelling) in school or anywhere for that matter - just basic corporal punishment.  

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, MDM said:

 

I am very glad to say I never had any direct experiences of pedophiles (paedophiles in the British English spelling) in school or anywhere for that matter - just basic corporal punishment.  

 

 

 

I didn't have any direct experience either but learned about this teacher's shocking behaviour many years later after his victims finally stepped forward. He ended up going to jail during his retirement years. Corporal punishment was accepted in Canada when I was a kid. I can't think of a more cowardly and damaging way to behave towards children, especially in supposed educational settings. Fortunately, things have changed in that department.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Harry Harrison said:

Thank you, your other comments regarding the question from Damian Collins MP rather depended upon your understanding of that timeline so I thought it might be important to clarify.

Absolutely.  Although it did strike me that there is an internal investigation into the situation she “may” have the same constraints.  But I do take the point made by others that her record in the area of press freedom may be open to criticism The entire government media handling is, to say the least lacking in ambition

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

More interest, this time from the Society of Editors:

 

https://www.societyofeditors.org/soe_news/soe-writes-to-police-chiefs-following-photographer-arrest/

 

I liked the following, “We are seeking assurances from the NPCC that guidelines on this issue will be reinforced with forces throughout England and Wales to ensure there is no repeat of this incident.”

 

Sorry if anybody has seen this elsewhere.

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/02/2021 at 11:36, John Mitchell said:

There are too many stories like yours out there. I also have some alarming ones to tell -- a sadistic elementary teacher in a small rural school that I attended, a popular science teacher in my high school who turned out to be pedophile, to name a couple. It's amazing how we survive our school years.

 

One teacher said that no matter how much I hated her, I would only know true hate as an adult.  She was wrong.  I've never hated anyone as much as I hated her, because as an adult, I can walk away. 

  • Upvote 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Mr Standfast said:

More interest, this time from the Society of Editors:

 

https://www.societyofeditors.org/soe_news/soe-writes-to-police-chiefs-following-photographer-arrest/

 

I liked the following, “We are seeking assurances from the NPCC that guidelines on this issue will be reinforced with forces throughout England and Wales to ensure there is no repeat of this incident.”

 

Sorry if anybody has seen this elsewhere.

Personally, as ex-police, I’m curious what the necessity for his arrest was as given to the custody sergeant who authorised his detention. This link is good because they make the point quite plainly that he could have been invited for voluntary interview.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, MizBrown said:

 

One teacher said that no matter how much I hated her, I would only know true hate as an adult.  She was wrong.  I've never hated anyone as much as I hated her, because as an adult, I can walk away. 

 

It was criminal what some teachers used to get away with. Today, parents would sue, and rightly so.

 

P.S. I say this as someone who spent many years teaching in both public and private schools. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I spent 3 1/2 years in a small private school during most of my high schools years and the teachers had written permission from parents that they could knock the crap out of the kids if they felt it was needed.  They also had the "board" of education...also known as the paddle.  It resembled a cricket bat and they would assemble all the students to watch  someone get paddled.  Very much not legal now.  I am happy to say that I never got the paddle, but I did have a teacher pull me out of a chair by my hair and throw me to the ground for talking to the kid next to me.  Needless to say, I hated it there and I managed to convince my parents to take me out of there and finish my last year of high school in the public school system.  It was at that public school when I got very interested in photography and joined the school newspaper and yearbook.  The public school had two darkrooms and all the materials needed to develop film and print photos.  The small private school did not even have any sort of arts program.  I felt like I broke out of prison and landed in paradise, by comparison.

 

Years later, I ran into the "headmaster" of the private school and he asked me what I was doing with my life and I told I was a professional photographer and no thanks were to go to him or his school....I really did say that, I could let him feel any joy for my career happiness.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...
On 11/02/2021 at 15:06, Michael Ventura said:

I spent 3 1/2 years in a small private school during most of my high schools years and the teachers had written permission from parents that they could knock the crap out of the kids if they felt it was needed.  They also had the "board" of education...also known as the paddle.  It resembled a cricket bat and they would assemble all the students to watch  someone get paddled.  Very much not legal now.  I am happy to say that I never got the paddle, but I did have a teacher pull me out of a chair by my hair and throw me to the ground for talking to the kid next to me.  Needless to say, I hated it there and I managed to convince my parents to take me out of there and finish my last year of high school in the public school system.  It was at that public school when I got very interested in photography and joined the school newspaper and yearbook.  The public school had two darkrooms and all the materials needed to develop film and print photos.  The small private school did not even have any sort of arts program.  I felt like I broke out of prison and landed in paradise, by comparison.

 

Years later, I ran into the "headmaster" of the private school and he asked me what I was doing with my life and I told I was a professional photographer and no thanks were to go to him or his school....I really did say that, I could let him feel any joy for my career happiness.

 

That's an alarming story, but you're not alone. I attended a small, two-room elementary school in a village in Quebec for almost three years. There were four grades (4-7) in my classroom. The teacher, a large imposing woman, used to drag one girl in particular whom she didn't like into the cloakroom and literally thrash her with a stick. We could all hear her screaming. This teacher also used to walk around hitting certain students on the knuckles. She always had a ruler or stick in hand. Fortunately, she liked me because I was a well-behaved kid who got good marks, so I escaped her wrath. What I don't understand is why parents used to allow this kind of thing to happen. I'm sure that the girl I referred to was emotionally damaged for life.

Edited by John Mitchell
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Stuart artyography photography said:

Shouldn't need to be a member of a professional body. Not a free press if there's boundaries inplace to control the narrative.

Any citizen should be able to do reportage in a public place.

Nobody is stopping you from reporting in a public place???

There's always boundaries to overcome, good journalists usually get past them

Being a member of the UK press pass scheme for example shows law enforcement that you belong to a professional body that has checks in place to ensure you are, who you say you are.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, PAL Media said:

Nobody is stopping you from reporting in a public place???

There's always boundaries to overcome, good journalists usually get past them

Being a member of the UK press pass scheme for example shows law enforcement that you belong to a professional body that has checks in place to ensure you are, who you say you are.

It didn't stop this PJ being arrested and held for 7 hours.

Link to post
Share on other sites

There was a case decided here in the US this week where a photojournalist was arrested in Des Moines, Iowa, while covering a George Floyd protest for continuing to shoot images after the police told people to disburse. While it went to trial, the jury acquitted her. Scary that some police have so little respect for journalists in countries like ours where there has always been such a long tradition of press freedom.

 

Here's a link to the case from her newspaper: https://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/news/2021/03/10/andrea-sahouri-trial-des-moines-register-reporter-acquitted-george-floyd-protest-arrest/6933780002/ 

 

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Marianne said:

There was a case decided here in the US this week where a photojournalist was arrested in Des Moines, Iowa, while covering a George Floyd protest for continuing to shoot images after the police told people to disburse. While it went to trial, the jury acquitted her. Scary that some police have so little respect for journalists in countries like ours where there has always been such a long tradition of press freedom.

 

Here's a link to the case from her newspaper: https://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/news/2021/03/10/andrea-sahouri-trial-des-moines-register-reporter-acquitted-george-floyd-protest-arrest/6933780002/ 

 

 

Interesting article re journalist assaulted and arrested by police, including "Des Moines police officer pepper-sprayed her and detained her." and "After a three-day trial, the six-member jury returned a verdict Wednesday of not guilty on both charges." I hope the journalist Andrea Sahouri now takes action for wrongful arrest and sues for the maximum she can.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, sb photos said:

 

Interesting article re journalist assaulted and arrested by police, including "Des Moines police officer pepper-sprayed her and detained her." and "After a three-day trial, the six-member jury returned a verdict Wednesday of not guilty on both charges." I hope the journalist Andrea Sahouri now takes action for wrongful arrest and sues for the maximum she can.

 

 

21 hours ago, Chuck Nacke said:

Deleted, rambling on nothing

 

Chuck

 

It certainly seems like it should have been dismissed without a trial. Thankfully the jury did the right thing. I purposely said little myself, Chuck, since if I got into how I felt about the arrest itself, I'd write an angry novel. I'm guessing so would you. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

At one time in the UK police used the Terrorism act of 2000 and Section 44 laws to harass photographers in a fashion similar to Patriot Act harassment in the United States. Those arrests seldom hold up in court.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 6 months later...

Just as a footnote to this old thread, Andy Aitchison receives a full apology from the Chief Constable of Kent Police, Alan Pughsley. Everything they did on that day was unlawful.

 

https://www.nuj.org.uk/resource/nuj-photographer-andy-aitchison-receives-an-apology-from-kent-police.html?fbclid=IwAR04x7Bp_1qhXcaQx_YkL0800WEpjom94sGJFPx9Ydo74V5gpCv1sXC4jjM

  • Like 5
  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Harry Harrison said:

Just as a footnote to this old thread, Andy Aitchison receives a full apology from the Chief Constable of Kent Police, Alan Pughsley. Everything they did on that day was unlawful.

 

https://www.nuj.org.uk/resource/nuj-photographer-andy-aitchison-receives-an-apology-from-kent-police.html?fbclid=IwAR04x7Bp_1qhXcaQx_YkL0800WEpjom94sGJFPx9Ydo74V5gpCv1sXC4jjM

 

Good news Harry. Better would be that the constabulary have learnt their lesson, but fear similar will happen again.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, sb photos said:

Good news Harry. Better would be that the constabulary have learnt their lesson, but fear similar will happen again.

Yes, all credit to both Andy Aitchison and the NUJ in standing up for the rights of photographers. Of course no explanation from Kent Police as to why they felt they could break the law with such abandon.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.