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Corn bread sold in Tesco and probably other food outlets.

 

Allan

 

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9 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

Corn bread sold in Tesco and probably other food outlets.

 

Allan

 

I make cornbread to go with ham & beans, also beef stew and beef goulash, tomato-based. I butter mine and eat it on the side, but my husband used to crumble it and pile on whatever. I’ve never been a fan of soggy bread, myself. So it’s a bite of one and a bite of the other.

Cornbread can almost make a meal sliced, buttered and with jam spread on it. I like grape, blackberry or orange marmalade. Mmm.

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5 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

I make cornbread to go with ham & beans, also beef stew and beef goulash, tomato-based. I butter mine and eat it on the side, but my husband used to crumble it and pile on whatever. I’ve never been a fan of soggy bread, myself. So it’s a bite of one and a bite of the other.

Cornbread can almost make a meal sliced, buttered and with jam spread on it. I like grape, blackberry or orange marmalade. Mmm.

Many thanks for the recipe Betty - Allan thanks also but I would prefer to have a go at making my own - need something to do😁

 

Carol

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1 hour ago, CAROL SAUNDERS said:

Many thanks for the recipe Betty - Allan thanks also but I would prefer to have a go at making my own - need something to do😁

 

Carol

I like an adventurous cook. Now give me your best scone recipe! 😄

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I love good cornbread, but don’t make it too often these days. My great-grandmother’s recipe doesn’t call for flour, but it does include a can of creamed corn. If I really want to fancy it up, I also add some chopped onion and pimiento before pouring half of the batter into the hot skillet. I next sprinkle on about a cup of shredded sharp cheddar, then repeat a second layer each of batter and cheese. My cooked cornbread is then served out of the skillet. I don’t think I could flip it out even if I tried. The skillet is too heavy.

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3 hours ago, Cecile Marion said:

I love good cornbread, but don’t make it too often these days. My great-grandmother’s recipe doesn’t call for flour, but it does include a can of creamed corn. If I really want to fancy it up, I also add some chopped onion and pimiento before pouring half of the batter into the hot skillet. I next sprinkle on about a cup of shredded sharp cheddar, then repeat a second layer each of batter and cheese. My cooked cornbread is then served out of the skillet. I don’t think I could flip it out even if I tried. The skillet is too heavy.

I have done the corn and cheese, too. Even jalapeño. It’s good, but heavy and tricky to get done in the middle. I always come back to the plain, because it doesn’t fight with my main dish. I think yours would be the delicious main dish!

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Oh, I agree mine can serve as a main course. When I had a house full of kids back in the day, I often served the cornbread with something like a hearty vegetable soup. Sometimes I added bits of ham to the cornbread, too. In fact, I last fixed the full cornbread recipe, along with a big mixed salad, this past “Covid” Christmas when it was just me and one of my sons for dinner.

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2 hours ago, Steve Hyde said:

 Here you go Betty. It’s the best recipe we’ve tried

 

https://www.saga.co.uk/magazine/food/recipes/baking/scones/mary-berry-fruit-scones

 

a-batched-of-freshly-baked-home-made-fru

 

 

 

 

 

Wow good stuff Steve I'm sure Betty will love these - I've also printed off the recipe and going to have a go - M & S do excellent ones though 75p each !

 

I'm accumulating a list of things to bake ha ha, even bought a food processor a few days ago.  My thinking was hoping to use one gadget instead of 3 different ones.  What I didn't realise is that I probably need a Masters Degree to use it😁  Some YouTube videos later.......... Also someone did warn me the blades are sharp, unfortunately I can confirm they are !🤨

 

Carol

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9 hours ago, Steve Hyde said:

 Here you go Betty. It’s the best recipe we’ve tried

 

https://www.saga.co.uk/magazine/food/recipes/baking/scones/mary-berry-fruit-scones

 

a-batched-of-freshly-baked-home-made-fru

 

 

 

 

 

Sounds good. 😁 I had to look up “sultanas”. White seedless grapes like raisins? In the picture, they look like regular raisins. Yum.

The making of these is much like making what we call biscuits here. No sugar, basically flour, fat, a bit of salt, milk or buttermilk.  Mixing and rolling out identical.

Over here, biscuits split and covered with chopped pork sausage cooked and mixed with milk gravy is a savory meal in itself. Melon is very good with it.  Often biscuits are served (at home, don’t see them in restaurants, they do toast) with breakfasts like eggs & bacon. Put some butter, jelly or jam between sliced biscuits. 
I forgot. There is supposed to be baking powder or soda in these. I do know there is a recipe for “soda” biscuits.

Edited by Betty LaRue
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10 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

Sounds good. 😁 I had to look up “sultanas”. White seedless grapes like raisins? In the picture, they look like regular raisins. Yum.

The making of these is much like making what we call biscuits here. No sugar, basically flour, fat, a bit of salt, milk or buttermilk.  Mixing and rolling out identical.

Over here, biscuits split and covered with chopped pork sausage cooked and mixed with milk gravy is a savory meal in itself. Melon is very good with it.  Often biscuits are served (at home, don’t see them in restaurants, they do toast) with breakfasts like eggs & bacon. Put some butter, jelly or jam between sliced biscuits. 
 


I think the main difference between a sultana and a raisin is the type of grape they’re produced from. Both are widely sold here. In the South West of England, where I live, scones are normally served as an english cream tea. That’s with cream, jam and a cup of tea or coffee. We had biscuits on a visit to Nashville a few years ago. We had them for a hotel breakfast with a savoury gravy. You’re right, they were the same as what we would call scones 🙂
 

a-freshly-prepared-scone-with-jam-and-cr

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On 02/03/2021 at 09:35, Allan Bell said:

 

Love apple pie and custard. Love apple pie and cream. Love apple pie and custard and cream.

 

Does something make you think I love apple pie?

 

Allan

 

My Yorkshire wife loves apple pie and custard, and cream, and ice cream. She will ask for all three, especially in pubs. Remember eating in those?

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2 minutes ago, Martin P Wilson said:

My Yorkshire wife loves apple pie and custard, and cream, and ice cream.

How about your Lancashire wife?;)

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19 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

How about your Lancashire wife?;)

Northern me: 1 custard, 2 cream, 3 ice cream

Southern husband: 1 ice cream, 2 cream.....custard...no way!! 

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Posted (edited)
9 minutes ago, Thyrsis said:

Northern me: 1 custard, 2 cream, 3 ice cream

Southern husband: 1 ice cream, 2 cream.....custard...no way!! 

Just the gelato for me per favore. Con spritz Select al Ravennate. I'm a fully qualified great southern jessie.

Edited by spacecadet
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What do you call cream? I call it the fat-laden part that floats to the top of the milk.

oh, you are talking about whipped cream!

Edited by Betty LaRue
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59 minutes ago, Steve Hyde said:

I think you’re right, we call it clotted cream

I always wondered what clotted cream was! It sounded like something spoiled. When my milk goes bad, it starts to clot! 
It’s amazing the different names we have for the same things, depending on which side of the pond we’re on.

Whipped cream is putting cream in the mixing bowl, whipping it up, adding a bit of sugar toward the end. Wonderful on strawberry shortcake.

 

W9G1H6.jpg

Edited by Betty LaRue
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1 hour ago, Betty LaRue said:

What do you call cream? I call it the fat-laden part that floats to the top of the milk.

oh, you are talking about whipped cream!

In the UK ‘double cream’ is just very thick cream, like the top of full fat milk. It’s not whipped nor does it have added sugar! 

Single cream is thinner so that you can pour it. Clotted cream, from the SW of the country, is made by a heating and then cooling process to form ‘clots’ of cream which  have a very high fat content. Traditionally eaten with scones and jam in a ‘cream tea.’ As in Steve’s image above.

 

Edit: Double cream can be whisked to make a thicker cream for filling cakes, meringues etc. This would then be more like whipped cream. 

Edited by Thyrsis
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Yes, as Betty alluded to, we love our whipped cream in the U.S.  The good stuff is handmade but it is sold in cans and tubs at the grocery.  

 

This was shot at bakery cafe in Louisville, Kentucky of some bread pudding and whipped cream with a drizzle of caramel on top....so good!

 

food-bread-pudding-and-whipped-cream-at-please-and-thank-you-in-louisville-D8DWF3.jpg

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On 08/03/2021 at 17:14, Michael Ventura said:

Yes, as Betty alluded to, we love our whipped cream in the U.S.  The good stuff is handmade but it is sold in cans and tubs at the grocery.  

 

This was shot at bakery cafe in Louisville, Kentucky of some bread pudding and whipped cream with a drizzle of caramel on top....so good!

 

food-bread-pudding-and-whipped-cream-at-please-and-thank-you-in-louisville-D8DWF3.jpg

Oh, yeah! Bread pudding. I make it from time to time and have recipes I’ve figured out on my own. I prefer lemon sauce, myself. I must have several recipes for that as I’m trying to duplicate a lemon hard sauce I had on rice pudding in a cafeteria at my workplace years ago.
It drives me crazy when I eat something I instantly love and want to know how to make it. I spent 6 months trial and error before I perfected my baked bean recipe after a cater’s one I ate once. At that, it’s really not a precise recipe. I just throw the ingredients together, taste and adjust. I spent years making the baked beans a certain way, and these i make now contain none of the ingredients I used to use. My grandson requested them (Mimi’s beans)for his wedding rehearsal BBQ outdoor dinner.

 

Bread pudding with a lemon sauce tryout that didn’t meet my expectations. It was good, but too thick of a sauce.

2AKDGCK.jpg

Edited by Betty LaRue
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On 08/03/2021 at 19:21, Martin P Wilson said:

My Yorkshire wife loves apple pie and custard, and cream, and ice cream. She will ask for all three, especially in pubs. Remember eating in those?

 

Hi Martin, Long time no see on here. Nice to see you back.

 

As a bye my wife was a beautiful Lincoln lass, unfortunately not on this planet anymore.

 

Allan

 

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