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I fear it will get worse if it hasn’t already with the level of education, when my children graduated high school and went to university, they were made to take an English course as the universities were becoming increasingly aware of the poor level of English education.

 

Yes I have put spelling in keywords such as i before e and then slipped in an e before i as well as the various U.S. and UK versions. You also have to imagine image buyers for whom English is as a second language. When I have time on my hands I will search commonly misspelled words just to be aware of trends.

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9 minutes ago, Normspics said:

 

 

Yes I have put spelling in keywords such as i before e and then slipped in an e before i as well as the various U.S. and UK versions. You also have to imagine image buyers for whom English is as a second language. When I have time on my hands I will search commonly misspelled words just to be aware of trends.

 

 

i am curious do people only worry about US and UK usage, or do you also cater to other English usage variation, like Capsicum (OZ, NZ) for Sweet pepper and bell pepper? 

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I'm not that bothered about the UK/US variations, it's pretty basic to try to cover those if you are at all professional about keywording, but there are lots of other alternatives come easily to mind. Use as many as you have room for or feel comfortable about. Whatever brings up my images in answer to searches is OK. But copying other peoples keywording is definitely not OK!

 

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1 hour ago, PAL Media said:

Whoever gave me the red arrow, look at the emojis, it was clearly said in jest 🙄

Wasnae me.

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1 hour ago, PAL Media said:

Whoever gave me the red arrow, look at the emojis, it was clearly said in jest 🙄

Repetition

Edited by Sally
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1 hour ago, PAL Media said:

Whoever gave me the red arrow, look at the emojis, it was clearly said in jest 🙄

Sorry the submit button didnt appear to be working.

Edited by Sally
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56 minutes ago, meanderingemu said:

 

 

i am curious do people only worry about US and UK usage, or do you also cater to other English usage variation, like Capsicum (OZ, NZ) for Sweet pepper and bell pepper? 

Yes, I do a lot if I remember aubergine - eggplant the car parts are a minefield, windshield windscreen. Anything to appeal to what image buyers might use, bearing in mind that UK usage is probably the most relevant to Alamy, but there is still a New York Alamy office (?). As an example things like the household bins that have wheels, just wiki that and see what all the english speaking countries call them lol.

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1 hour ago, PAL Media said:

Piensas en volver a Sevilla algún día?

 

No. Seville is a lovely city, but it's not my city. And working out legal residency and healthcare is not doable for me in Spain. I know the Malaga coast and Mallorca better. I have just a little travel Spanish. I speak some Italian. 

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2 hours ago, meanderingemu said:

note that splitting words and misspelling , though some rewards, also increases chance of False positive so this has to be weighed 

 

out of curiosity i did search how many results for "boarder"  there was, where you would now also potentially appear.  

 

Forgetting to put % % around, i got only one results for:"Boarder art Mexico" 🤔.   Not going to rush and include that one any day soon .  In fact most of searches for %boarder% with word on it's own, are spelling mistakes of border....  

what does the % do?

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7 minutes ago, BradleyPhoto said:

what does the % do?

It's called a wildcard. Searches for any appearance of the search string, not just an exact match. So  "spell" would only return spell, %spel% (one "l") would return spelling, misspelling, misspelt, etc. Done on a complete word, it will return any phrase containing the term, as emu said.

Edited by spacecadet
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I got a sale for a file of a 'known person' whose name I had unknowingly mis-spelt, i.e. I had no idea there was an alternative spelling of her not-uncommon surname. Presumably the person searching was the same. So now I've added the correct spelling but left the wrong one 'just in case'.

Otherwise, I do put in variants, and sometimes also foreign words if relevant, e.g. Roma, Firenze or a particular building or bridge. I.e. only if the photo has been taken in a particular country.

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2 hours ago, spacecadet said:

It's called a wildcard. Searches for any appearance of the search string, not just an exact match. So  "spell" would only return spell, %spel% (one "l") would return spelling, misspelling, misspelt, etc. Done on a complete word, it will return any phrase containing the term, as emu said.

Ah, I see! Cheers!

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4 hours ago, spacecadet said:

It's called a wildcard. Searches for any appearance of the search string, not just an exact match. So  "spell" would only return spell, %spel% (one "l") would return spelling, misspelling, misspelt, etc. Done on a complete word, it will return any phrase containing the term, as emu said.

 

In AoA Precisely it will allow letters before and/or after. Though in fairness i am not sure the one after does anything.

 

If i search for 

 

"Skate"  it will return any search that Starts with Skate______,  so it will included include "Skate in park" but Also "Skateboard".  It will however not return "Ice skate" 

In fact Skate% seems to yield similar results.

 

 

adding % before i.e %Skate will yield search above, plus searches that have Skate somewhere in the body like "Paul and Jill skate on thin ice"  

again %Skate% seems to yield same number of results. 

 

 

 

anyone knows one circumstance where the % after has an impact?

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45 minutes ago, meanderingemu said:

 

anyone knows one circumstance where the % after has an impact?

 

Not from the top of my head but it definitely has. Wim posted a while ago an excellent list of examples using the three placements of %. I wouldn't know where to look for it.

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12 hours ago, gvallee said:

 

Not from the top of my head but it definitely has. Wim posted a while ago an excellent list of examples using the three placements of %. I wouldn't know where to look for it.

 

Same here. And we had the same problem before. This was a good item though: https://discussion.alamy.com/topic/9185-alamy-stats-usagehow-do-you-use-them/

The thing I sometimes do with a % at the end is to exclude something: searching for London will give you Londonderry, but London % will exclude those.

 

wim

 

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1 hour ago, wiskerke said:

 

Same here. And we had the same problem before. This was a good item though: https://discussion.alamy.com/topic/9185-alamy-stats-usagehow-do-you-use-them/

The thing I sometimes do with a % at the end is to exclude something: searching for London will give you Londonderry, but London % will exclude those.

 

wim

 

that make sense.   so not as much as a wildcard, but the increase the search term

 

 

i assume you would also lose "London, UK" from that search .  though nor sure if many people use punctuation 

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That's an easy test:

Yes you do lose London, UK.

 

And clients do use a comma. Not so much with London, UK, but with a lot of other searches they do.

Also bear in mind that some searches are cut and paste phrases from either the book or article the researcher is trying to find images for or direct cut and paste from a list of subjects that someone sends somebody else to go find. Like the proverbial intern.

 

Here are some examples from the rolling year for London,

 

London, England March 06 2008: Mural by David Choe in Soho who only last few days before being erased. Image ID: 2BNBGAR

London, from York Column. Date: circa 1830s

London, Midland and Scottish railway poster

London, Midland and Scottish railway poster warren williams

London, Midland and Scottish railway poster llandudno

London, St George's Square

London, St James's St James's Square

London, UK. 14th October, 2017. Walk for Freedom

London, UK. 22 June 2013. PHANTOM OF THE OPERA

London, UK. 25 February 2016 Beyond the Fence

London, UK. 25 February 2016. Photocall for Beyond the Fence

London, UK. 25th Mar, 2017. A view of The Rio Cinema in London. Photo date: Friday, March 24, 2017. Photo credit should read: Roger Garfield/Alamy Cre

 

wim

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1 hour ago, wiskerke said:

That's an easy test:

Yes you do lose London, UK.

 

And clients do use a comma. Not so much with London, UK, but with a lot of other searches they do.

Also bear in mind that some searches are cut and paste phrases from either the book or article the researcher is trying to find images for or direct cut and paste from a list of subjects that someone sends somebody else to go find. Like the proverbial intern.

 

Here are some examples from the rolling year for London,

 

London, England March 06 2008: Mural by David Choe in Soho who only last few days before being erased. Image ID: 2BNBGAR

London, from York Column. Date: circa 1830s

London, Midland and Scottish railway poster

London, Midland and Scottish railway poster warren williams

London, Midland and Scottish railway poster llandudno

London, St George's Square

London, St James's St James's Square

London, UK. 14th October, 2017. Walk for Freedom

London, UK. 22 June 2013. PHANTOM OF THE OPERA

London, UK. 25 February 2016 Beyond the Fence

London, UK. 25 February 2016. Photocall for Beyond the Fence

London, UK. 25th Mar, 2017. A view of The Rio Cinema in London. Photo date: Friday, March 24, 2017. Photo credit should read: Roger Garfield/Alamy Cre

 

wim

 

 

thanks,was on my phone and AoA not really phone friendly to do the test 🙂  

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1 hour ago, meanderingemu said:

 

 

thanks,was on my phone and AoA not really phone friendly to do the test 🙂  

 

That's OK, I didn't know myself. Had not thought about it even, so thanks for that insight.

 

wim

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On 06/01/2021 at 10:07, Normspics said:

Yes, I do a lot if I remember aubergine - eggplant the car parts are a minefield, windshield windscreen. Anything to appeal to what image buyers might use, bearing in mind that UK usage is probably the most relevant to Alamy, but there is still a New York Alamy office (?). As an example things like the household bins that have wheels, just wiki that and see what all the english speaking countries call them lol.

 

Seeing a recent search for utility trucks reminded me that Australian utility trucks, aka "utes" are not the same as a utility truck in the US. 

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14 minutes ago, noelbennett said:

On Alamy there is one page of Volksvagen cars and 466 pages of Volkswagen cars! 

 

no marketing advantage there.  0 searches for  %Volksvagen in last year

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1 hour ago, MizBrown said:

 

Seeing a recent search for utility trucks reminded me that Australian utility trucks, aka "utes" are not the same as a utility truck in the US. 


Quite a different truck, the UK has similar smaller pick up trucks more car based than American trucks, although American vehicles are becoming more popular worldwide which is blurring the past. I do a lot of looking into wiki for the different descriptions and names.

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