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All,

 

After recently uploading 8 images and passing QC, only one accepts tags / captions etc and shows "on sale".  The other 7 allow tagging / captioning / saving but  resolutely refuse to go on sale !  I've allowed time for the Alamy servers to update / consolidate themselves as they occasionally need to do.

Solvable by me or by the Alamy side ?   In the dim (and diminishing past !) I seem to recall that I had to delete the lot and re-submit.  Is that the case , anyone had similar problems and solutions? 

 

Regards

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22 minutes ago, Magnus said:

All,

 

After recently uploading 8 images and passing QC, only one accepts tags / captions etc and shows "on sale".  The other 7 allow tagging / captioning / saving but  resolutely refuse to go on sale !  I've allowed time for the Alamy servers to update / consolidate themselves as they occasionally need to do.

Solvable by me or by the Alamy side ?   In the dim (and diminishing past !) I seem to recall that I had to delete the lot and re-submit.  Is that the case , anyone had similar problems and solutions? 

 

Regards

As a beginning check the 2D4XH46 caption ...and the other photo with a bird, as well....

Regards!

Edited by Ognyan Yosifov
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7 hours ago, Magnus said:

Ooops need lessons in proof reading to start with !!  Cut and paste (and cutting corners) at fault. 

Your image 2CYWAX4  "Juvenile Peregrine falcon on Cornish coastal cliff". I'm not an expert but it looks  a lot like a kestrel to me.

Edited by Shergar
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Are you 100% sure that you entered the caption in the correct field? That's the only explanation I can think of.

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4 hours ago, Shergar said:

Your image 2CYWAX4  "Juvenile Peregrine falcon on Cornish coastal cliff". I'm not an expert but it looks  a lot like a kestrel to me.

 

Most juvenile birds are actually the same size as their parents when they begin flying on their own and often are heavier (parents feed them up because once they leave the parents, they'll have to learn how to hunt effectively, and a bit of extra body weight helps a young bird get through that first period.

 

The photos of juvenile peregrines in my North American raptors book show most Peregrines with the black streak on the head (the "mustache") running directly below the eye and not as narrow as in this photo.  Also with more white on the head above the nares. Tundra peregrine juveniles have a narrower mustache mark, but still most of the area below the eye is the mark and they have a pale head.   Common kestrels show up in North America as vagrants from time to time, so they're in the book, too.   The authors note that juvenile plumage for those is like the adult female which has a much narrower mustache mark and white on the head under the eye.   Looks like at least the Bavarian peregrine juveniles have the broader mustache mark.  And at least one other photographer has misidentified a kestrel as a peregrine.

Edited by MizBrown
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Thanks all for your kind comments.   Possibly (definitely!) in too much of a hurry to get back “in the game” to sort out and upload accumulated backlog 😐.  The not for sale issue now solved. 

Re the raptor - on the case.  Need to have a word with the twitcher  or is that birder (who) that “advised” me. 🙄.

Thanks again - stay safe.

Message ends. 

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11 hours ago, Magnus said:

Thanks all for your kind comments.   Possibly (definitely!) in too much of a hurry to get back “in the game” to sort out and upload accumulated backlog 😐.  The not for sale issue now solved. 

Re the raptor - on the case.  Need to have a word with the twitcher  or is that birder (who) that “advised” me. 🙄.

Thanks again - stay safe.

Message ends. 

 

Seeing a peregrine is more exciting than spotting a kestrel.  I've seen far more American Kestrels in the wild than I've ever seen Peregrine falcons.  If the bird is at a distance, it may be hard to tell.  I have a photo of a wild bird in a distant tree that could be either, though someone else reported seeing a Peregrine at the same location.  Peregrines are a world wide species with populations from the arctic to Tierra del Fuego and Australia, so there's some variety in the sub-species.   Eastern US species is extinct, and mixed race peregrines have been reintroduced, along with some hybrids with Sakers and Gyrfalcons. 

 

Check the other juvenile peregrines in Alamy's collection and I think you'll see the difference.   This gives some idea of the variety in the species:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peregrine_falcon

 

A really good resource for raptors is the International Falconry Forum, based in the UK. 

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