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8 hours ago, The Blinking Eye said:

 

Really good point about the buckle on the Bushwick. I don't like it either.

 

Given the good sale price, though, one could probably learn to live with the buckle.

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On 30/07/2020 at 02:15, Cal said:

 

There's a pic I still need to upload (it might require me to apply for archive as it's an older film scan) that illustrates well how pros are adept at carrying seemingly endless amounts of kit. It was taken at a pride march and shows a photographer wielding what looks like a Canon 1D while another is strapped around his body. The one he's shooting has a 70-200 or similar, the other either a 16-35 or 24-70. Then he has a couple of bags on him which don't look light, and he was only a small guy. He also had a bizarre way of operating the camera, it looked like he was firing the shutter with his ring finger and using his index to twiddle the settings knob on the back.

 

Check out this double sling outfit for the "camera over each shoulder crowd"~!!! https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/759985-REG/OP_TECH_USA_6501082_Double_Sling_Black.html?ap=y&smp=y

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2 hours ago, The Blinking Eye said:

 

Check out this double sling outfit for the "camera over each shoulder crowd"~!!! https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/759985-REG/OP_TECH_USA_6501082_Double_Sling_Black.html?ap=y&smp=y

 

Hi, I have one of these and I like it.  However I've only used it when I feel safe with a lot of stuff on display.

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2 hours ago, The Blinking Eye said:

 

Check out this double sling outfit for the "camera over each shoulder crowd"~!!! https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/759985-REG/OP_TECH_USA_6501082_Double_Sling_Black.html?ap=y&smp=y

This is what I use at weddings, and sometimes at other events depending on the situation.

Really useful for having short zoom on one and long on the other.

Phil

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4 hours ago, The Blinking Eye said:

 

Check out this double sling outfit for the "camera over each shoulder crowd"~!!! https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/759985-REG/OP_TECH_USA_6501082_Double_Sling_Black.html?ap=y&smp=y

 

Cotton Carrier has a lot of solutions similar to this one... https://www.cottoncarrier.com/pages/slingbelt. I've used one that holds one camera on the hip. This was on wildlife trips. I don't like to change lenses and I could be using my 80-400 on a tripod and have my 18-300 on my other camera on my hip. I have teeny shoulders and big hips so it worked for me to not have something hanging on my shoulder.

 

Paulette

 

 

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13 hours ago, NYCat said:

 

Cotton Carrier has a lot of solutions similar to this one... https://www.cottoncarrier.com/pages/slingbelt. I've used one that holds one camera on the hip. This was on wildlife trips. I don't like to change lenses and I could be using my 80-400 on a tripod and have my 18-300 on my other camera on my hip. I have teeny shoulders and big hips so it worked for me to not have something hanging on my shoulder.

 

Paulette

 

 

 

Fantastic, thanks so much! I seriously am learning so much. And here I thought it was dumb question. 😁

 

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On 28/07/2020 at 23:11, The Blinking Eye said:

 

The Billingham's I am looking at now scream "camera inside"! But I can see how that works if you're putting on a show for the public. 🙂

 

Michael Palin made them acceptable as travel bags in his TV series so some of them are not as 'cameras be here' as you might think.  When I used to shoot top-end houses for clients, there is an expectation of the OTT gear you would use - hence Billinghams did the job and looked the part...... as did the Loakes etc.

 

Funny now that when I see a photographer lugging a big backpack plus loads of gear anywhere (Villa Ephrussi one memorable example....very hot and up a hill), I now think Alamy photographer...... ;)

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On 26/07/2020 at 11:42, MDM said:

 

Yes almost entirely Lowe Pro bags for many years now except for a single Manfrotto aberration in a sale at a show. I currently use a 150 Lowe Pro which is really comfortable. Shoulder bags and holster bags tend towards imbalance and get banged around much more easily than a backpack. 

 

The Lowepros look great! (still making my way through this thread)

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On 26/07/2020 at 12:54, Ed Rooney said:

Ohhhh, I was gonna do my next blog on this very subject.

 

 Lots of good info here! Almost too much. 😅 Would love to see your blog post if you'd like to post the link here.

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On 26/07/2020 at 19:42, MizBrown said:

I used what the US people call a fanny pack when I'm out with my a6000 and one lens.   Doesn't look like a camera bag.  I also have a security camera strap that I used in Mexico.  Also have some camera bags.   My favorite ThinkTank bag that I know longer own isn't showing on the TT site now.  Alternative is the Mirrorless Mover.   My other two cameras are a cheap LowePro camera bag I bought when I needed more space than my ThinkTank Mirrorless Mover 20 and a Billingham 220. 

 

I have my cameras on camera straps except for one Sony a7 on a shoulder strap. 

 

Nicaraguans who have big cameras either carry them like footballs in their arms or don't take them out of the house.

 

If you're out with a Sony a6000, put it on a wrist strap unless you're using long lenses.  If that's the case, put a security strap on it so it can't be cut off if that makes you feel more secure.

 

Could have carried the Billingham in Mexico City, but wasn't sure it would be allowed in some of the museums.

If you're in seriously dodgy places, having a dog with you might be useful. 

 

What I do is one lens, one camera, on a wrist band.  Flash if I'm out at night.   Cameras are snatch and grab and sell on fast here except for thieves who specialize in pro gear and go to weddings or steal from studios. 

 

Having non-Nikon, non-Canon gear is somewhat to very less appealing to thieves who are snatching and selling fast. 

 

 

Interesting note about committing to just one lens while going out. I'm still trying to figure out which lens to bring for my a6000 if I just want one. I also like the fanny pack idea and wondering if I could even jog with something like that if I took the a6000 and the small lens.

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On 27/07/2020 at 03:45, Ed Rooney said:

In film days, I used Tenba shoulder bags and a Halliburton for extras when travelling. With my Nikon DSLRs, I used Domkes. I still have the slightly smaller Domke F3 Ballistic with me but I don't walk around with it. Instead, I have a small Manfrotto that holds a RX100 and an a6000 with the 10-18 zoom. However, most of the time I go out with just a RX100-V or a 100-6 in a pocket. All my jackets have large pockets. I used to have UPstraps on my Nikons. 

 

What bugs me is the silly, inept way so many "photographers" carry and handle their cameras. 

 

 

Totally love the large pocket jacket idea. I'm going to think about that. However, I could only wear it sometimes, as it's pretty warm here. Shopping for a light jacket with big huge pocket now...

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6 minutes ago, The Blinking Eye said:

 

Interesting note about committing to just one lens while going out. I'm still trying to figure out which lens to bring for my a6000 if I just want one. I also like the fanny pack idea and wondering if I could even jog with something like that if I took the a6000 and the small lens.

 

The Sony/Zeiss 24 mm I have is stupid expensive but on the a6000, is the equivalent angle of view as a 35mm on full frame.  I've also used a 18-55mm zoom that came with my a3000 but which is available new.  The other lens I've used in dodgy situations is an adapted 50mm Yashinon, manual focus only.  Sony also makes a 35mm that's roughly a normal lens.   If I were running with a camera, I'd get one of those square wraps with the velcro corners. 

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2 minutes ago, MizBrown said:

 

The Sony/Zeiss 24 mm I have is stupid expensive but on the a6000, is the equivalent angle of view as a 35mm on full frame.  I've also used a 18-55mm zoom that came with my a3000 but which is available new.  The other lens is an adapted 50mm Yashinon, manual focus only.  Sony also makes a 35mm that's roughly a normal lens.   If I were running with a camera, I'd get one of those square wraps with the velcro corners.  

 

I have the 18-50mm lens. You mean you would wrap the camera in the square wrap and put it inside the fanny pack?

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Just now, The Blinking Eye said:

 

I have the 18-50mm lens. You mean you would wrap the camera in the square wrap and put it inside the fanny pack?

 

Or use the wrap to pad the bottom and sides of the fanny pack if you want quicker access to the camera.

 

 

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On 27/07/2020 at 06:22, wiskerke said:

 

All bags and backpacks look like camera bags. It's the shape.

A bit like all animals can recognize a human figure unless he/she is extremely well camouflaged. And it's not camo color but blurring the contour that does it.

For men this might work. 😂

For women this may be a good starting point.

 

It seems that the basic question Blinking Eye is asking is how to be discreet and that means how to hide your gear.

That won't work if you want to take any picture at all.

 

If I'm taking pictures I have my camera in my hand at all time. For security of my camera I always have the neck strap wound around my hand and wrist, so that I can let go of the grip and still not drop it. In tight situations a big camera can be safer than a small one. BTDT but no t shirt.

If you want to be inconspicuous use a phone. Or my favorite: dress in hi vis workwear.

 

My go to bag is a Lowepro Nova AW (All Weather) with the rain cover.

(but I also have a Tenba bag and Billingham bags. Plus lots of cases: a watertight  Calumet ; an indestructible KMP; the Sinar and several brilliant super lightweight French sailor's cases)

I use the smallest Lowepro bag that will carry everything I want to bring. (I have sizes 2-5).

For a shoulder strap I use a long strap in a loop that goes through both rings. One side of the loop goes over my left shoulder and the other on my right shoulder. This way the weight is distributed and the bag keeps level and steady while I move. I add a hip belt as well. If I clip that open, the bag swings in front of me in one simple move. Just in case.

Because people will try to steal stuff in some countries/cities/neighborhoods/situations. (If you want to totally relax go to Japan with your gear; if you're an adrenaline junky, go to Madrid.)

 

wim

 

 

I honestly do miss the near invisibility of the iphone camera. I know that the camera is obvious when I take it out to take pictures. I didn't feel comfortable at all taking pictures in a lot of places in Mexico City, even with my phone. One in my group had their iphone stolen in the subway.

 

But here, I don't take pictures every moment and often walk through Oakland streets and poorer neighborhoods or near the ports alone. I take the camera in and out of my bag according to who is in the vicinity and how badly I want to take a picture, then I throw it back in the bag again. I do this constantly. But my backpack isn't really suited for it and I feel like my camera gets scruffed up without more padding and protection.

 

I usually don't use any strap on the camera at all. Probably because the wrist or neck strap would be a hassle if I'm putting it in and out of my bag all the time.

 

I'm not really picturing your big loop on both shoulders or how the hip belt swings in front, but I appreciate the ideas and links. It seems everyone develops their own personal techniques.

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6 hours ago, The Blinking Eye said:

I'm not really picturing your big loop on both shoulders or how the hip belt swings in front, but I appreciate the ideas and links. It seems everyone develops their own personal techniques.

 

And that's a good thing.

So the next is just for your information.

It's just that I am used to working from my bag while I move. And a backpack gives others access to my gear in stead of myself. 😁

 

The loop is difficult to imagine and the use of it even more so. Until you try it.

So if you have some sort of bag that has a shoulder strap that you can take off, this could be a small bag or a purse even, use that to try it out.

Take an 8 ft string, could be any material, it's just to demonstrate the principle.

Now loop the string through the eyelets or D-rings that would normally hold the shoulder strap, from one side to the other.

Tie the string so it becomes a long 8 ft loop. Pull up the shortest part so the whole thing looks like before when the shoulder strap was on. Hang it on your right shoulder (if you're right handed) like before, just now the shoulder strap consists of a double string.

Pick one of the strings and lift it up over your head onto your left shoulder et voila.

It helps if the strings are untangled. Which is a lot easier with a regular strap. Nowadays I simply use two straps from two different Lowepro bags. They clasp to each other with the sliders that come with them. I have made my own straps in the past and they do look neater.

Now if the strings are untangled, you can move your shoulders up and down independently, while your bag stays level.

And the weight sort of rests on two shoulders. Sort of, because most weight will still rest on the shoulder that is closest. In this case on the right hand side.

But it does help. The sliding hip belt helps some more. Because like with a good backpack, most of the weight should be transferred to your hips, not your shoulders.

In my case I'm guesstimating 40% goes to the hips; 35% to the right shoulder and 25% to my left shoulder.

 

My hip belt is an ordinary plain belt. It's webbing, actually of car safety belt quality, also that width, with a simple quick release buckle. Mine is plastic or nylon. Any outdoors, hunting or camping gear shop will have those items. The car safety belt quality webbing is not only more durable, but it's much smoother and thinner. Mine is olive drab. The rest of my gear is definitely not military looking. Not any more. Never ever go into an area where you may be mistaken for a combatant of any which side with camo or military style gear. That may have been cool 25 or 30 years ago, but nowadays it could get you killed.

 

wim

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55 minutes ago, wiskerke said:

It's just that I am used to working from my bag while I move.

 

Me too most of the time.

 

56 minutes ago, wiskerke said:

And a backpack gives others access to my gear in stead of myself.

 

That reminds me of an author who was travelling on London's tube carrying her 12" PowerBook G4 in a backpack (long time ago). On a crowded platform she felt the bag move, turned around and someone was pulling the PowerBook out of her bag. In a struggle it hit the floor and was a write off. All as told to me. I remember removing the hard drive to get her data back (no up to date backup). The HD had survived, but they were a pig to access. The novel was called Powerbook, I still haven't read it.

 

Even with my shoulder bag, someone lifted my compact monopod from a side pocket on the crowded tube. Cost me £48 to replace.

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12 hours ago, The Blinking Eye said:

 

I honestly do miss the near invisibility of the iphone camera. I know that the camera is obvious when I take it out to take pictures. I didn't feel comfortable at all taking pictures in a lot of places in Mexico City, even with my phone. One in my group had their iphone stolen in the subway.

 

I was in Mexico City with a friend except at one of the archeological sites.   Get a second a6000 while they're cheap(er).  My back ups are a pair of a7 original models.  The saddest thing is being afraid to take photos.  The ways around this are just being resigned to losing a camera and having either insurance (not something I can get here) or hiring a local photographer or assistant to go with you (met a woman photographer in Leon who had two assistants with cameras of their own).  

 

One advantage of something like the a6000 is that Sony cameras tend to be less well known by the snatch and sell set.  On the other hand iPhones are distinctive and any kind of phone is highly desired theft items, especially a distinctive phone, but really any phones.  One of my friends had a Huawei I'd sold her dipped out of her purse, and recovered when the store checked the security tapes.  I've been told in Managua to keep my phone in my bra.   When I sell my used phones on, I've always found a buyer in less than an hour.  A thief will do better than that.

 

12 hours ago, The Blinking Eye said:

 

 

I usually don't use any strap on the camera at all. Probably because the wrist or neck strap would be a hassle if I'm putting it in and out of my bag all the time.

 

Hate neck straps except that the good alternatives are pricy.  I have cheap and reliable enough wrist straps, and a neck strap on the camera that carries heavier lenses from time to time.   Wrist straps are easy to deal with compared to neck straps.

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2 hours ago, MizBrown said:

 

I was in Mexico City with a friend except at one of the archeological sites.   Get a second a6000 while they're cheap(er).  My back ups are a pair of a7 original models.  The saddest thing is being afraid to take photos.  The ways around this are just being resigned to losing a camera and having either insurance (not something I can get here) or hiring a local photographer or assistant to go with you (met a woman photographer in Leon who had two assistants with cameras of their own).  

 

 

This is actually a really interesting point that has never occurred to me. To just take the chance of getting the camera stolen, without fear. They'd probably just want the camera and not me right? I've never thought of going into it with that attitude. Though I remember hearing an incredible documentary filmmaker speak once. He made a film (Dogtown Redemption) about homeless people, some of whom had severe drug problems. He followed their lives around intimately for a few years. People asked him about the risk to his equipment during a Q&A. He said it was just a camera. He could always get another one if something happened to it. And I don't think anything ever happened to it.

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7 hours ago, wiskerke said:

 

And that's a good thing.

So the next is just for your information.

It's just that I am used to working from my bag while I move. And a backpack gives others access to my gear in stead of myself. 😁

 

The loop is difficult to imagine and the use of it even more so. Until you try it.

So if you have some sort of bag that has a shoulder strap that you can take off, this could be a small bag or a purse even, use that to try it out.

Take an 8 ft string, could be any material, it's just to demonstrate the principle.

Now loop the string through the eyelets or D-rings that would normally hold the shoulder strap, from one side to the other.

Tie the string so it becomes a long 8 ft loop. Pull up the shortest part so the whole thing looks like before when the shoulder strap was on. Hang it on your right shoulder (if you're right handed) like before, just now the shoulder strap consists of a double string.

Pick one of the strings and lift it up over your head onto your left shoulder et voila.

It helps if the strings are untangled. Which is a lot easier with a regular strap. Nowadays I simply use two straps from two different Lowepro bags. They clasp to each other with the sliders that come with them. I have made my own straps in the past and they do look neater.

Now if the strings are untangled, you can move your shoulders up and down independently, while your bag stays level.

And the weight sort of rests on two shoulders. Sort of, because most weight will still rest on the shoulder that is closest. In this case on the right hand side.

But it does help. The sliding hip belt helps some more. Because like with a good backpack, most of the weight should be transferred to your hips, not your shoulders.

In my case I'm guesstimating 40% goes to the hips; 35% to the right shoulder and 25% to my left shoulder.

 

My hip belt is an ordinary plain belt. It's webbing, actually of car safety belt quality, also that width, with a simple quick release buckle. Mine is plastic or nylon. Any outdoors, hunting or camping gear shop will have those items. The car safety belt quality webbing is not only more durable, but it's much smoother and thinner. Mine is olive drab. The rest of my gear is definitely not military looking. Not any more. Never ever go into an area where you may be mistaken for a combatant of any which side with camo or military style gear. That may have been cool 25 or 30 years ago, but nowadays it could get you killed.

 

wim

 

OK, I *think* I am picturing the double shoulder straps. Do both straps fall across your torso diagonally and the bag rests on your right hip or in front of you? That's a really clever way to balance the weight AND make it more secure!! How does it attach to the hip belt? Still not visualizing that part. 🙂

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On 27/07/2020 at 08:22, Chuck Nacke said:

Forget about bags, The real tool is a BUSH JACKET...

 

They are getting really hard to find.

 

For years, I have worn my cameras over my shoulder and under a 3/4 length Bush Jacket.

Protects them from the elements and crowds.

 

One thing people should keep in mind: Hiding cameras and then pulling them out can be

dangerous.  I've seen a still photographer shot by security police after they surprised police

by pulling out a Black camera body with a 80-200 f2.8 lens out.  In my opinion it is best when

working in a conflict zone to make it obvious that you are carrying a camera.

 

I also NEVER cross camera straps over my head, there are times when loosing a camera

is better than loosing your head or body.

 

Chuck

 

Someone else mentioned a jacket with big pockets and that really rang a bell with me!

 

As to your other pointers, I'm not sure I'm that hardcore. I have deliberately avoided high conflict situations though I have had opportunity several times. I'm not sure risking my body or head for a shot is really where I'm going, but I do admire those that do that kind of work.

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My experience in Brazil, depending on the area (risk of assault or robbery):

-----------------------------------------

Low risk zone
Lowepro Fastpack 350 DSLR Camera Backpack

 

Lowepro Photo Runner Beltpack/Shoulder Camera Bag (bought in 2007)
Different modular belt pouches (So I can separate the camera and lens)
or just carry a compact camera in the pocket
High risk zone

-----------------------------------------

In particular, the kit choice depends on the event and location.

Normally, I feel more comfortable using an old beltpack/shoulder camera bag for walk around street photography.

andre

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4 hours ago, The Blinking Eye said:

 

OK, I *think* I am picturing the double shoulder straps. Do both straps fall across your torso diagonally and the bag rests on your right hip or in front of you? That's a really clever way to balance the weight AND make it more secure!! How does it attach to the hip belt? Still not visualizing that part. 🙂

 

In this earlier post, there's a link to a full size image. The straps are quite clear there. The hip belt (which hangs loose in that pic) goes through some sort of tunnel or some lugs that most bags have. And I wear it on my back when not in use, in safe areas. It slides to my side when I need something. Or in front when I have to change larger lenses or adapters or need some small stuff from one of the pockets. When I want to sit down, I click the belt buckle open and have my bag in my lap in under a second. The same on an escalator or in public transport, but then usually without unbuckling. I do open it when I have to climb steep stairs or move quickly. A bit like when I would unbutton my jacket. Also those buckles can make quite a snapping sound, which sometimes seem to signal alertness: very useful. 😁

 

wim

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I only use a camera bag for transporting in vehicle. When wandering around, usually have camera slung from left shoulder, either under coat or gilet depending on weather. Out of view until needed and I've used the same technique for Nikon D40, D90, D500 and a Fuji FInepix 9600. Got down to one lens - 18-300 for the focal lengths I may cover. Got a 50mm 2.8 which I sometimes carry in a pocket.

 

Krisken

 

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