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Sally R

Sony RX100 VA or Sony RX100 VII?

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35 minutes ago, Sally R said:

I may find some issues with edge sharpness too. I found this review of the optics which mentions some corner sharpness issues when shooting wide https://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/sony-rx100-v/sony-rx100-vA4.HTM 

 

I like controlling depth of field so will start using aperture priority and test some different apertures. I think it will be trial and error to get the best out of the little camera. So looking forward to taking it on walks and bike rides.

 

 

 

There is definitely some fall off in sharpness towards the edges with the VA which is normal for many lenses but it is nothing that would cause an Alamy QC failure. I tend to downsize them for Alamy anyway so they look similarly sharp across the field. I use Lightroom and the default sharpening is too strong I think so I lower it a bit. It makes the images look over-sharpened to me in comparison to what I get from my Nikons. For what it is  - a tiny, very lightweight, pocket-sized camera with a tiny sensor that produces very decent images - the camera is amazing. 

 

Because of the small sensor, getting sufficient depth of field is often not an issue. A bigger issue is trying to put the background out of focus. 

 

 

Edited by MDM
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Thanks MDM. That's helpful. Yes I might do some downsizing if I think the corners are too soft. Thanks re: the depth of field. I'll experiment and see what I can achieve for out of focus backgrounds, even if it can't match a DSLR. Really looking forward to using this little camera.

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Just a little tip, but you probably know this already.

 

Shooting with full frame          f5.6     f8         f11     f16

Shooting with APS-C crop       f4       f5.6       f8       f11

Shooting with 1" sensor         f2.8       f4       f5.6     f8

 

For similar DOF approx.

 

Allan

 

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52 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

Just a little tip, but you probably know this already.

 

Shooting with full frame          f5.6     f8         f11     f16

Shooting with APS-C crop       f4       f5.6       f8       f11

Shooting with 1" sensor         f2.8       f4       f5.6     f8

 

For similar DOF approx.

 

Allan

 

Thank you Allan! That definitely helps as I'm new to shooting with a 1" sensor and that gives me a good sense of the comparison with my APS-C Nikon camera 👍

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I am starting to get used to my new (secondhand) RX V. The lens is OK, not anything like as good as I get from my film era primes on the a6000, but better than some  other Sony zooms that I have tried. The wide end appears to be a bit better than the long. I might have to consider downsizing some of the  images for Alamy, something I don't normally have to with the a6000.

 

For the moment I've settled upon f4 and aperture priority, and auto ISO, occasionally having to tweak the exposure. I also tried full auto, but the results were not to my liking. Low ISO images are commendably clean.

 

I'm relying on auto focus as the viewfinder is not as good as that on the a6000 while the contrast detect feature isn't as helpful - too much orange across the screen when composing the shot, but insufficient when blown up for manual focus. Folk with younger, sharper, eyes might not have such a problem.

 

It won't replace my a6000, but for occasions when the purpose of an outing is not principally photography, it's a useful practical bit of kit that will slip into a pocket. It may or may not ever earn its keep through sales, but for family and friends photos, and social media, it does a job. It's an ideal camera to take on a bike ride.

 

Edited by Bryan

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8 hours ago, Bryan said:

I'm relying on auto focus as the viewfinder is not as good as that on the a6000 while the contrast detect feature isn't as helpful - too much orange across the screen when composing the shot, but insufficient when blown up for manual focus. Folk with younger, sharper, eyes might not have such a problem.

 

I'm guessing that with the contrast detect feature you mean focus peaking, not the AF setting. Btw where is this in the bloody menu?? - Not that you would want to shift to contrast detect as phase detect is much quicker and much more accurate.

When I use focus peaking, I have the color set to yellow; the initial magnification set to 5.3 and the magnification time to No Limit. Focus peaking works in this mode and is quite decent. When pressing the center button the magnification goes to 10.7 but focus peaking doesn't work in this mode, which is exactly as you would want it.

All this is for MF only, but like you, I mostly use AF.

 

wim

 

edit: I forgot: Peaking Level set to Low.

Edited by wiskerke
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3 hours ago, wiskerke said:

 

I'm guessing that with the contrast detect feature you mean focus peaking, not the AF setting. Btw where is this in the bloody menu?? - Not that you would want to shift to contrast detect as phase detect is much quicker and much more accurate.

When I use focus peaking, I have the color set to yellow; the initial magnification set to 5.3 and the magnification time to No Limit. Focus peaking works in this mode and is quite decent. When pressing the center button the magnification goes to 10.7 but focus peaking doesn't work in this mode, which is exactly as you would want it.

All this is for MF only, but like you, I mostly use AF.

 

wim

 

edit: I forgot: Peaking Level set to Low.

 

It's all too confusing for me Wim!  On the a6000 I find that the focus peaking works with the magnified image, and I do find that useful.  I have it set to low.

 

I've just copied your settings over to the RX V and that is a big improvement - thanks 🙂

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On 03/09/2020 at 02:26, Sally R said:

I'm planning to get Capture One Express for Sony which is free for Sony cameras. My current software won't handle the Sony RAW files. Capture One is meant to be a very good RAW converter so I'm hoping it can cope well with any noise issues that arise. It doesn't have all the bells and whistles of the Pro version, but I am happy to start with that and see how it goes.

 

I don't have any experience with the RX100. However, I use Capture One Express with my other Sony cameras and can report that its automatic noise reduction does a very good job. I've yet to have to fiddle with the noise reduction sliders.  I'm quite happy with Capture 1 Express so far. The catalogue is a bit confusing; however, I haven't really explored how to set it up properly as I have my own weird way of storing images.

Edited by John Mitchell

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1 hour ago, Bryan said:

 

It's all too confusing for me Wim!  On the a6000 I find that the focus peaking works with the magnified image, and I do find that useful.  I have it set to low.

 

I've just copied your settings over to the RX V and that is a big improvement - thanks 🙂

 

I have now 5 or 6 Sony cameras or bodies and the menu is different in each of them.

cat head desk GIF by hoppip

Sometimes a lot; sometimes just a little bit.

 

I swear they're gaslighting us!

 

wim

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26 minutes ago, wiskerke said:

 

I have now 5 or 6 Sony cameras or bodies and the menu is different in each of them.

cat head desk GIF by hoppip

Sometimes a lot; sometimes just a little bit.

 

I swear they're gaslighting us!

 

wim

 

I've been using Sony cameras since 2007. The menus have always been the work of the devil.

 

Gaslighting? Best to not go there these days... 🤐

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17 minutes ago, John Mitchell said:

 

I've been using Sony cameras since 2007. The menus have always been the work of the devil.

🤐

 

Prior to my RX100 the only other Sony camera I used was a DSC-R1. Great camera in its day, and although the sensor was only slightly smaller than APS-C it wasn't on Alamy's approved list. The RX100 is a great camera too, as long as it's limitations are realised. 

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45 minutes ago, sb photos said:

 

Prior to my RX100 the only other Sony camera I used was a DSC-R1. Great camera in its day, and although the sensor was only slightly smaller than APS-C it wasn't on Alamy's approved list. The RX100 is a great camera too, as long as it's limitations are realised. 

 

So I've heard. Maybe I'll break down and buy one after I win the Alamy lottery.

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On 18/09/2020 at 02:13, John Mitchell said:
On 03/09/2020 at 17:26, Sally R said:

I'm planning to get Capture One Express for Sony which is free for Sony cameras. My current software won't handle the Sony RAW files. Capture One is meant to be a very good RAW converter so I'm hoping it can cope well with any noise issues that arise. It doesn't have all the bells and whistles of the Pro version, but I am happy to start with that and see how it goes.

 

I don't have any experience with the RX100. However, I use Capture One Express with my other Sony cameras and can report that its automatic noise reduction does a very good job. I've yet to have to fiddle with the noise reduction sliders.  I'm quite happy with Capture 1 Express so far. The catalogue is a bit confusing; however, I haven't really explored how to set it up properly as I have my own weird way of storing images.

 

Thanks John,

 

Yes I've been using Capture One Express for Sony with my RX100 for a few weeks now. I'm really impressed with the rendering of the Raw files and the handling of noise. I have also never had to adjust the noise sliders. At first I was thrown a bit by the quality of the Raw file, because it looks like it has been already half-edited. They appear more colourful than in other Raw converters so it almost seemed weird at first. But I've gotten used to that now and I've been able to set up a quick workflow, as less work and adjustment is required than in other software I've used. Initially I didn't think I would use the auto-adjust feature, but tried it a few times and it worked very well. Most of the time it makes very good decisions about where to lift the exposure, lift or darken shadows, reduce highlights etc... So now I only need to do minor tweaks at most for the majority of images. It seems it is especially good at being tailored to the Sony Raw files, so all in all it is turning out well.

 

I also have my own weird ways of storing and managing images, and often don't do it the way the software is designed. I'm also still learning to understand the catalogue. I don't know if I will go with the full version of CO for Sony at some point. I would like to know that some of the issues with things like keystone corrections are ironed out before doing so. But in the meantime, as a free option it is excellent.

 

Another interesting thing I've found is that with a number of images you get extra image real estate that appears in the thumbnails in Capture One. By this I mean there is actually more image there than appears in-camera - it is wider than the standard dimensions. The area of standard dimensions is shown as highlighted in the thumbnail with the extra bit visible on each side. If you click on it and go into the image and then expand with the crop tool, you can expand to include these extra dimensions in the image. I'm not sure why this happens but it seems to be part of Capture One's recipe for the profile for the camera. Perhaps where it is correcting the distortion it is stretching out the image and gives you the full picture of everything from the original capture? The RX100 has significant distortion, so perhaps it gets unravelled to create a wider than usual image, if that is possible? Do you find you get this extra width in some images also? I often find there is significant corner softness there and have generally not utilised the extra area of image, but I'm curious as to how the software creates this.

 

Edit: In relation to the extra image area you get in Capture One, I have now found explanations:

 

https://lifeafterphotoshop.com/can-capture-one-see-more-than-your-camera/

 

https://lifeafterphotoshop.com/there-may-be-more-in-your-raw-files-than-you-think-see-this-in-capture-one/

Edited by Sally R

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On 17/09/2020 at 13:31, Bryan said:

I am starting to get used to my new (secondhand) RX V. The lens is OK, not anything like as good as I get from my film era primes on the a6000, but better than some  other Sony zooms that I have tried. The wide end appears to be a bit better than the long. I might have to consider downsizing some of the  images for Alamy, something I don't normally have to with the a6000.

 

For the moment I've settled upon f4 and aperture priority, and auto ISO, occasionally having to tweak the exposure. I also tried full auto, but the results were not to my liking. Low ISO images are commendably clean.

 

I'm relying on auto focus as the viewfinder is not as good as that on the a6000 while the contrast detect feature isn't as helpful - too much orange across the screen when composing the shot, but insufficient when blown up for manual focus. Folk with younger, sharper, eyes might not have such a problem.

 

It won't replace my a6000, but for occasions when the purpose of an outing is not principally photography, it's a useful practical bit of kit that will slip into a pocket. It may or may not ever earn its keep through sales, but for family and friends photos, and social media, it does a job. It's an ideal camera to take on a bike ride.

 

I'm getting used to my RX100 too Bryan. It certainly can't match my DSLR in a number of ways, but I'm finding it really handy and I'm getting at least some images I'm pretty happy with, and hope to do more so as I learn more about the camera. On a recent short trip it doubled really well with my DSLR as an extra camera. I only took my 11-16mm and and 90mm macro with me for the DSLR when I would normally take about two more lenses. The RX100 filled in the role of my 17-50mm lens which I left at home, and it meant less lens changing overall, which was convenient.

 

I've been using f4 to f8, also aperture priority and auto ISO. I've also found myself using the screen rather than the viewfinder as it has just felt easier, yet it is the opposite with my DSLR where I primarily use the viewfinder. I think it feels so small and awkward somehow, though I'm going to give it another go as I think I might hold the camera steadier up to my face than away from me.

 

I'm still getting some disappointments with more corner softness than I would like, but hoping to keep learning how to get the best out of it. Most of all I love that I can take it on bike rides as well, and out for walks and pretty much anywhere.

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