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Sony RX100 VA or Sony RX100 VII?

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14 hours ago, Bryan said:

Another question, any idea if the RX100 VA is supported by the last stand alone version of LR? 

Yes, version V is the last to be supported by Lightroom Perpetual (6.14).

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Thanks for the clarification Michael and Harry. 🙂

 

I've just bought a used, but "as new"  V.  Fingers crossed it's OK ! 😟

 

Comes with a 6 month guarantee, will be carrying out a lot of tests.

 

Like Edo the appeal of the 24 mm equivalent lens was a clincher for me. I have long lenses that I can use for specialist purposes with other cameras., but for walk around wide is king. 24-105 would have been better I guess.

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Posted (edited)
On 30/07/2020 at 11:26, ChrisC said:

As I said, I wouldn't because there doesn't seem to be that much advantage, for the price, but I'm not using the later versions, others will know the answer or have a better opinion

 

If there was a slightly higher price than the mk 3 that had 24-120 equivalent, I'd consider that when mine bites the dust, but the rises in price are too much for me or if my sales of Sony photos went through the roof, however. I feel it is still a point and shoot, a very good point and shoot, but doesn't compare to my Nikons, but you can take it anywhere, be less obtrusive and I've not had anyone question my motives.....yet! & for the size the quality is very good 

 

CC

 

 

I’ve taken many indoor market images with my mk3 like this. 
You notice nobody is paying me any attention.

2AA1REN.jpg
 

FP98FT.jpg

Edited by Betty LaRue
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On 23/08/2020 at 13:34, Bryan said:

Thanks for the clarification Michael and Harry. 🙂

 

I've just bought a used, but "as new"  V.  Fingers crossed it's OK ! 😟

 

Comes with a 6 month guarantee, will be carrying out a lot of tests.

 

Like Edo the appeal of the 24 mm equivalent lens was a clincher for me. I have long lenses that I can use for specialist purposes with other cameras., but for walk around wide is king. 24-105 would have been better I guess.

 

Good luck with it, Bryan. 

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Am I correct in thinking that the autofocus is faster and more accurate when I use auto mode on my RX100V and VI? Ot is this another delusion of mine?

 

Edo

 

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Posted (edited)

Bought an RX100-VI with $100+ in cashback recently. Haven't had time to experiment. But looking forward to 4k video and touch-screen - and other improvements. Still got the RX 100III and my full-frame, of course.

Edited by Niels Quist

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That's great news both Bryan and Niels that you have purchased RX100s! Have fun with it and I look forward to seeing any images you post. I am planning to get the RX100 VA in the next couple of weeks.

 

It is nice to see your candid photos Betty. I look forward to being less conspicuous than I am with my DSLR, as well as the incredible convenience of such a small camera!

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On 24/08/2020 at 22:41, Ed Rooney said:

 

Good luck with it, Bryan. 

 

Thanks Edo 

 

Received the camera yesterday and took it for a walk today. Conditions pretty poor, dull overcast. Forgot to reset the date and time so all images marked 2016 Doh!! None of them worth uploading, but that's not the fault of the camera.

 

Mixed feelings about the results, I used it on auto focus and it didn't always find the spot. Have since changed the setting to flexible spot so that I can be more specific about where the point of focus needs to be. I normally shoot mostly manual focus so this will take some getting used to. Also the extreme edges of some of the more distant shots are not great shooting at f5.6. They're better than that expensive Sony  Zeiss zoom that I tried on the a6500 but not a patch on my collection of film era primes. Need to spend a bit more time and experimentation to determine if this is to be a keeper.

 

One thing for sure, it's much easier to carry than a bag full of lenses and an a6500.

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There are tradeoffs to be considered between DSLRs with primes and small mirrorless cameras. It takes some time to set the menu on a new camera. I'm sure you with find your own  best selections, Bryan.

 

Recently, I've had my little Sonys programmed for RAW on full-auto. It's my impression, right or wrong, that the auto-focus is faster and more accurate that way. In the past, I mostly used the A setting.

 

Edo

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12 hours ago, Bryan said:

 

Thanks Edo 

 

Received the camera yesterday and took it for a walk today. Conditions pretty poor, dull overcast. Forgot to reset the date and time so all images marked 2016 Doh!! None of them worth uploading, but that's not the fault of the camera.

 

Mixed feelings about the results, I used it on auto focus and it didn't always find the spot. Have since changed the setting to flexible spot so that I can be more specific about where the point of focus needs to be. I normally shoot mostly manual focus so this will take some getting used to. Also the extreme edges of some of the more distant shots are not great shooting at f5.6. They're better than that expensive Sony  Zeiss zoom that I tried on the a6500 but not a patch on my collection of film era primes. Need to spend a bit more time and experimentation to determine if this is to be a keeper.

 

One thing for sure, it's much easier to carry than a bag full of lenses and an a6500.

Yeah being used to a DSLR (or SLR back in the old days), Autofocus on a compact can be annoying and hit and miss, but it isn't the same camera, best to remember the image quality is very good, it's unobtrusive and although it has it's limitations, you will be able to take images you probably wouldn't take and also when you didn't expect to take them.

Like any camera there is a learning curve.

 

CC

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Yes Edo time and patience required to get the best out of this beast !

 

I watched a video on how to set up the camera and followed most of the advice. Have to say that the instruction manual supplied is pretty poor and I've had to find out how to do some  things by experiment. Just as well Im used to the idiosyncracies  of the Sony a6500, as this one is similar.   Still not sussed how to engage manual focus and also manually adjust the aperture and speed, but presume it is possible 🙃

 

I've since had the chance to stick the camera on a tripod and set to manual exposure with flexible spot auto focus selected. The quality is better than I achieved yesterday, certainly acceptable for close and middle distance work (commendably good actually, even incredible considering the sensor size), but jury still out for landscapes where I was seeing appreciable softness at the edges of the frame.

 

 

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If you learn well from books Gary Friedman has done good ones I think. I have the first one but he seems to have also done more recent ones.

 

Paulette

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3 hours ago, NYCat said:

If you learn well from books Gary Friedman has done good ones I think. I have the first one but he seems to have also done more recent ones.

 

Paulette

+1


I got his Kindle book on the VA and VI last year and it is invaluable. He goes into all sorts of things that are not in the manual as well as making judgements on what is or is not likely to be useful which is something manuals never do. Well worth the £15 or whatever it cost. Saved me loads of time messing about. 

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Thanks for the heads up on the Friedman books Paulette and Mike. I'lll take a look.

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7 minutes ago, Bryan said:

Thanks for the heads up on the Friedman books Paulette and Mike. I'lll take a look.


I just checked and there is a kindle version available for the V for £15.99. I would strongly recommend it.  I have been using Nikons for years and never need a guide - a glance at the manual suffices if I need to know or forget something. But the RX-100 is a different kind of mini-beast. There is so much packed into it that and it is so tiny that a different approach is needed. Whereas I always shoot manual with my Nikons, I typically shoot shutter priority with this as it is far too fiddly to change things quickly when shooting. It is never going to match my big cameras and quality lenses in terms of image quality but it is astoundingly good for the size and QC is no problem as many others have said. 

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, Bryan said:

Yes Edo time and patience required to get the best out of this beast !

 

I watched a video on how to set up the camera and followed most of the advice. Have to say that the instruction manual supplied is pretty poor and I've had to find out how to do some  things by experiment. Just as well Im used to the idiosyncracies  of the Sony a6500, as this one is similar.   Still not sussed how to engage manual focus and also manually adjust the aperture and speed, but presume it is possible 🙃

 

I've since had the chance to stick the camera on a tripod and set to manual exposure with flexible spot auto focus selected. The quality is better than I achieved yesterday, certainly acceptable for close and middle distance work (commendably good actually, even incredible considering the sensor size), but jury still out for landscapes where I was seeing appreciable softness at the edges of the frame.

 

 

 

Don't have or know about the Sony RX100 mk5 but on the mk3 I always have mine set on M for manual which allows you to adjust the aperture and speed yourself.

 

Obtaining manual focus can be achieved via the function button menu. (Simplified menu appears at bottom of screen). Navigate to box which may (probably) says "AF-S" and click on it then select "MF".

 

The other way is to go to the camera page in the menu, navigate to page 3 (on mk3 may be different on mk5) and at top of page is "Focus mode". Click on that and on next screen navigate to "MF" (manual focus). Click on MF. You can then use the ring around the lens to set focus manually. When turning the ring an enlarged image appears in the viewfinder to help with focussing.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Have to admit I do not use MF myself and always use AF.

 

Allan

 

Edited by Allan Bell
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I’ve always used auto everything. No complaints and many images on Alamy.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

The other way is to go to the camera page in the menu, navigate to page 3 (on mk3 may be different on mk5) and at top of page is "Focus mode". Click on that and on next screen navigate to "MF" (manual focus). Click on MF. You can then use the ring around the lens to set focus manually. When turning the ring an enlarged image appears in the viewfinder to help with focussing.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Have to admit I do not use MF myself and always use AF.

 

Allan

 

 

Thanks Allan, the problem I have is in both selecting manual focus and adjusting the shutter speed and/or aperture under manual exposure. Manual focus uses the same ring as the aperture selector. I guess that there will be a way but I've yet to find it. However I've downloaded Friedman book and hopefully the answer will be in there somewhere.

 

Edit - it is, you press the down arrow (bottom of the rear control ring) to toggle between shutter speed and aperture adjustment.

Edited by Bryan
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Posted (edited)
47 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

I’ve always used auto everything. No complaints and many images on Alamy.

 

Each to their own Betty, whatever works for you.

 

I have been using a set of film era lenses on my a6500 and prior to that the NEX 6 for years and have got accustomed to manual focus. I like the certainty it brings. Prior to that I used Canon DSLRs whose viewfinders were hopeless for manual focus, and I had to use auto. Prior to that the gloriously bright screens of Pentax and Olympus SLRs - it's only the advent of really good EVFs that have enabled digital cameras to offer a similar, and even better, experience.

 

In practice I find that you sometimes miss a shot due to messing around with manual focus, but, equally, I've had examples where the camera's auto focus system has got it wrong. Once I agreed to take a series of shots of a colleague's vintage motorbike. I used a tripod (belt and braces) but the camera focused on the background and the bike wasn't in precise focus in any of the photos, a tad embarrassing!  I know that you can tweak the auto focus these days but old dogs etc.....

 

Actually this camera appears to have a hybrid auto/manual focus setting, which I think the good Mr Friedman recommends, so I might take a look at that.

Edited by Bryan

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9 hours ago, Bryan said:

 

Each to their own Betty, whatever works for you.

 

I have been using a set of film era lenses on my a6500 and prior to that the NEX 6 for years and have got accustomed to manual focus. I like the certainty it brings. Prior to that I used Canon DSLRs whose viewfinders were hopeless for manual focus, and I had to use auto. Prior to that the gloriously bright screens of Pentax and Olympus SLRs - it's only the advent of really good EVFs that have enabled digital cameras to offer a similar, and even better, experience.

 

In practice I find that you sometimes miss a shot due to messing around with manual focus, but, equally, I've had examples where the camera's auto focus system has got it wrong. Once I agreed to take a series of shots of a colleague's vintage motorbike. I used a tripod (belt and braces) but the camera focused on the background and the bike wasn't in precise focus in any of the photos, a tad embarrassing!  I know that you can tweak the auto focus these days but old dogs etc.....

 

Actually this camera appears to have a hybrid auto/manual focus setting, which I think the good Mr Friedman recommends, so I might take a look at that.

When I said auto everything, I only mean the RX100 series. Not my Nikons in the past, or my Fuji’s. Many moons ago, I was deep into watercolor painting, and had a Cannon SureShot 35mm film camera. It was a point & shoot. I used it to take family photos, but especially reference images for my paintings.
Wow, that little camera was wonderful. In those days, I didn’t know fstops shutter speeds or anything about photography other than an understanding of composition and using a steady hand. And when to look through the viewfinder and not take a shot!

Bryan, can’t wait to see your output from your new RX.

I just picked up two enlargements from that camera, and can’t wait to paint from them. 
(Chuck, the scan of the negatives turned out very well. I’m happy.)

I've come a long way, but even so, I use autofocus 99% of the time. 😁

 

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16 hours ago, Bryan said:

 

Thanks Allan, the problem I have is in both selecting manual focus and adjusting the shutter speed and/or aperture under manual exposure. Manual focus uses the same ring as the aperture selector. I guess that there will be a way but I've yet to find it. However I've downloaded Friedman book and hopefully the answer will be in there somewhere.

 

Edit - it is, you press the down arrow (bottom of the rear control ring) to toggle between shutter speed and aperture adjustment.

 

Thank you for enlightening me about toggling between shutter and aperture adjustments with the rear control ring.

 

Allan

 

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17 hours ago, Bryan said:

 

Each to their own Betty, whatever works for you.

 

I have been using a set of film era lenses on my a6500 and prior to that the NEX 6 for years and have got accustomed to manual focus. I like the certainty it brings. Prior to that I used Canon DSLRs whose viewfinders were hopeless for manual focus, and I had to use auto. Prior to that the gloriously bright screens of Pentax and Olympus SLRs - it's only the advent of really good EVFs that have enabled digital cameras to offer a similar, and even better, experience.

 

In practice I find that you sometimes miss a shot due to messing around with manual focus, but, equally, I've had examples where the camera's auto focus system has got it wrong. Once I agreed to take a series of shots of a colleague's vintage motorbike. I used a tripod (belt and braces) but the camera focused on the background and the bike wasn't in precise focus in any of the photos, a tad embarrassing!  I know that you can tweak the auto focus these days but old dogs etc.....

 

Actually this camera appears to have a hybrid auto/manual focus setting, which I think the good Mr Friedman recommends, so I might take a look at that.

 

The setting you are talking about is called DMF on the VA so presumably the same on the V. It starts with AF and then you can tweak it manually if required.

 

I think this tiny camera requires using a different mindset simply because the controls are so tiny. The camera is remarkable for its size and what Sony have managed to put into it. So I think it is worth exploring the various options to really get the best out of the camera and take advantage of its tiny size rather than trying to use it like one might a normal camera. While it is possible to use it in manual exposure mode and manual focus if required, it is not particularly easy to do so. While I never use anything but manual exposure with my Nikons, I find manipulating both aperture and shutter speed with such tiny controls and the need to take the camera away from my eye to adjust anything safely very difficult. So I tend to use shutter priority with the RX-100 for the most part and exposure compensation, occasionally aperture priority and only rarely use manual exposure if the lighting is very difficult. 

 

I think the AF system is actually very accurate but it is important to become very familiar with the the focus area setting for full control when shooting so that it becomes second nature. I have used mine mainly for shooting scenes when out and about and get a very decent hit rate even with the wide area setting and single shot AF-S setting. But for more control, the other area options such as zone and flexible spot are likely to be more accurate if required as you have already discovered. I would never use the AF-A setting. 

 

As you say each to their own.

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Posted (edited)

First upload from the RX100, cycled through to Newcastle and found the river to be flat calm, wished I'd brought the a6500, but made do with the little camera !

 

2CEA31J.jpg

Central sharpness very good, edges could be better - but I've seen worse. Had to control the noise in the dark areas of the water.

Edited by Bryan
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Looks sharp enough all over for me, Bryan. Wow, not a ripple on the Tyne.

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On 01/09/2020 at 03:09, Bryan said:

First upload from the RX100, cycled through to Newcastle and found the river to be flat calm, wished I'd brought the a6500, but made do with the little camera !

 

2CEA31J.jpg

Central sharpness very good, edges could be better - but I've seen worse. Had to control the noise in the dark areas of the water.

 

Nice image Bryan. I've just got the RX100 VA now, so looking forward to trying it out over the next few days.

 

I may find some issues with edge sharpness too. I found this review of the optics which mentions some corner sharpness issues when shooting wide https://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/sony-rx100-v/sony-rx100-vA4.HTM 

 

I like controlling depth of field so will start using aperture priority and test some different apertures. I think it will be trial and error to get the best out of the little camera. So looking forward to taking it on walks and bike rides.

 

I'm planning to get Capture One Express for Sony which is free for Sony cameras. My current software won't handle the Sony RAW files. Capture One is meant to be a very good RAW converter so I'm hoping it can cope well with any noise issues that arise. It doesn't have all the bells and whistles of the Pro version, but I am happy to start with that and see how it goes.

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