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Sally R

Sony RX100 VA or Sony RX100 VII?

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I am currently feeling an overwhelming compulsion towards purchasing a Sony RX100. I have read some of the threads on here with interest. I am tossing up between the latest model VII, or the earlier VA.

 

I am leaning towards the VA for a number of reasons:

1) Cheaper price - can afford to buy sooner

2) Brighter, faster lens because of reduced focal range (24-70mm vs 24-200mm)

3) I am guessing slightly better/nicer backgrounds when using a shallow depth of field

4) Integrated ND filter

 

I'm interested whether anyone who has used both has found one better than the other? The main advantage of the later model seems to be the extra reach, but I think I like the idea of the faster lens more.

 

I'm certainly not wanting to replace my DSLR, but just love the idea of a high quality compact that I can have with me pretty much all the time and it just fits in a pocket. There are times when I want to head out on a walk or a bike ride but not carry my DSLR gear, and love the idea of the little Sony. I also like the idea of being in urban environments, for example maybe commuting through the city, and just being able to spontaneously capture something I come across.

 

I'm also noticing about a $200 difference between the VA model and the earlier V model. I understand the VA has a different processor, but not sure how much real world difference this would make? 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Just another question in relation to the above post. Has anyone with a Sony RX100 bought the grip that you can get for it? It looks like a potentially slippery little thing and I'm wondering if the extra $25 for a grip is worth it and makes it easier to hold?

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1 hour ago, Sally R said:

Just another question in relation to the above post. Has anyone with a Sony RX100 bought the grip that you can get for it? It looks like a potentially slippery little thing and I'm wondering if the extra $25 for a grip is worth it and makes it easier to hold?

 

I can't answer your first post as I only use the original RX100 and the later mkIII.

 

I would say that I found a grip to be extremely useful. I bought the Feniac grip for the original RX100 and found it made holding the camera much easier/steadier. When I got the mkIII I took the grip off the original and fitted it to the mkIII as I use that camera most of the time now.

 

I am not sure if the Feniac grip is still made or not. It came from the States.

 

Allan

 

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Sally R said:

I am currently feeling an overwhelming compulsion towards purchasing a Sony RX100. I have read some of the threads on here with interest. I am tossing up between the latest model VII, or the earlier VA.

 

I am leaning towards the VA for a number of reasons:

1) Cheaper price - can afford to buy sooner

2) Brighter, faster lens because of reduced focal range (24-70mm vs 24-200mm)

3) I am guessing slightly better/nicer backgrounds when using a shallow depth of field

4) Integrated ND filter

 

I'm interested whether anyone who has used both has found one better than the other? The main advantage of the later model seems to be the extra reach, but I think I like the idea of the faster lens more.

 

I'm certainly not wanting to replace my DSLR, but just love the idea of a high quality compact that I can have with me pretty much all the time and it just fits in a pocket. There are times when I want to head out on a walk or a bike ride but not carry my DSLR gear, and love the idea of the little Sony. I also like the idea of being in urban environments, for example maybe commuting through the city, and just being able to spontaneously capture something I come across.

 

I'm also noticing about a $200 difference between the VA model and the earlier V model. I understand the VA has a different processor, but not sure how much real world difference this would make? 

 

 

 


This article is very useful as a comparison of all the RX100 models. I had the same dilemma last year and opted for the VA. Aside from the longer focal length which may or may not be an advantage, the main advantages of the VI and VII appear to be with video. If you just want a tiny high quality camera for stills, then the VA might still be the best choice. 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by MDM

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59 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

I can't answer your first post as I only use the original RX100 and the later mkIII.

 

I would say that I found a grip to be extremely useful. I bought the Feniac grip for the original RX100 and found it made holding the camera much easier/steadier. When I got the mkIII I took the grip off the original and fitted it to the mkIII as I use that camera most of the time now.

 

I am not sure if the Feniac grip is still made or not. It came from the States.

 

Allan

 

Thank you Alan. I just read that those grips are no longer made, but I found that a Sony store here has grips for the RX100s. I think it would be a good idea. It would be devastating to drop over water or concrete! At first it will feel strange holding such a tiny camera too.

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38 minutes ago, MDM said:

This article is very useful as a comparison of all the RX100 models. I had the same dilemma last year and opted for the VA. Aside from the longer focal length which may or may not be an advantage, the main advantages of the VI and VII appear to be with video. If you just want a tiny high quality camera for stills, then the VA might still be the best choice. 

 

Thanks Michael, yes that is a helpful article. I think stills will be mainly my thing, so the VA seems the best option for me.

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Posted (edited)
16 minutes ago, Sally R said:

 

Thanks Michael, yes that is a helpful article. I think stills will be mainly my thing, so the VA seems the best option for me.

 

No worries Sally. I haven't dropped mine yet but I always use the wrist strap as it would be very easy to drop. I checked out those grips but I wasn't sure if they were compatible with the VA so didn't bother in the end.

Edited by MDM

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I bought the RX100 VII around the beginning of March this year. Bought from E-Infinity for best pricing. I had previously borrowed the V version for a day and hardly used it through lack of time. I went for the VII due to the lenses further reach, but normally shoot at no more than 120mm. Must get around undertaking some tests to see where the performance drops off at the long end. Previously I've used cameras with zoom lenses around 24-120mm, finding that focal length more versatile than 24-70mm if only carrying one camera and lens. Other reasons for picking the VII were improved autofocus and intending to start shooting some video. Just about to order a Zhiyan Crane M2 Gimbal for it. I bought the Sony grip, seems expensive for such a tiny piece of plastic, but it does feel better in the hand. Certainly cheaper than risking it slipping from my hand and the subsequent repair. Re its slower lens, if expected to produce OOF areas I would take my D750's. Final reason was I had the spare cash. Am very pleased with it.

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Regards slipping from the hand - the camera comes with a wrist strap and neck strap. I've been using my V5 for years like this and never any fear of it slipping away and far more secure than a hand grip IMHO. 

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7 minutes ago, sb photos said:

I bought the RX100 VII around the beginning of March this year. Bought from E-Infinity for best pricing. I had previously borrowed the V version for a day and hardly used it through lack of time. I went for the VII due to the lenses further reach, but normally shoot at no more than 120mm. Must get around undertaking some tests to see where the performance drops off at the long end. Previously I've used cameras with zoom lenses around 24-120mm, finding that focal length more versatile than 24-70mm if only carrying one camera and lens. Other reasons for picking the VII were improved autofocus and intending to start shooting some video. Just about to order a Zhiyan Crane M2 Gimbal for it. I bought the Sony grip, seems expensive for such a tiny piece of plastic, but it does feel better in the hand. Certainly cheaper than risking it slipping from my hand and the subsequent repair. Re its slower lens, if expected to produce OOF areas I would take my D750's. Final reason was I had the spare cash. Am very pleased with it.

 

Thanks very much for that Steve. E-Infinity are offering it $80 cheaper than the place I was looking at. Good to hear your thoughts about the VII. Yes, a DSLR I'm sure still performs best for nice OOF areas. I have to think about whether I will get frustrated only going to 70mm. The difference is about $500 between the two, so for me at the moment the VII might be just a bit too expensive.

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5 minutes ago, ReeRay said:

Regards slipping from the hand - the camera comes with a wrist strap and neck strap. I've been using my V5 for years like this and never any fear of it slipping away and far more secure than a hand grip IMHO. 

 

Thanks Ray, that's good to know. I'll definitely be keeping the strap around my wrist. I could see how I go with that first, and opt for a grip later if I think I need it.

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4 minutes ago, ReeRay said:

Regards slipping from the hand - the camera comes with a wrist strap and neck strap. I've been using my V5 for years like this and never any fear of it slipping away and far more secure than a hand grip IMHO. 

 

I can't recollect my VII coming with a neck strap, things have changed. I rely on the wrist strap (more of a thin loose loop), the grip and taking good care of the camera. So far I've never dropped a camera, and only one lens into a Welsh stream long ago.

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Sally, I own both a RX100-V and a RX100-6. For 3 to 4 years now, I've been taking almost all of my pics with the small Sonys. I always use the wrist strap and have no interest in the grip. 

 

For the subjects you capture most—birds, flowers, wildlife, and landscapes—I believe the RX100-VII would be the better choice. Handheld shooting with either zoom has never been an issue for me. I agree with Steve Bell that the lens is best from 24 to about 120mm, but I've never failed Alamy QC at 200mm. For depth of field control, the longer lens is more useful. Sony IS and some menu options are also helpful with low-light handholding. 

 

Good luck, dear, whichever you decide on.

 

Edo

 

 

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I keep the wrist strap on and also have the grip for easier steady holding. Holding steady was my main problem when I got it.

 

Paulette

 

 

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Many thanks Ed. Yes, birds, wildflowers and landscapes are favourite subjects of mine, and I think I will still be largely using my DSLR for those. I was thinking of the RX100 more as an additional camera for spontaneous moments when I'm not carrying the DSLR, such as candid street photography or out on a walk but wanting to travel light. Having the extra reach would be helpful though. For example, I was out on a walk a couple of days ago, and a Nankeen Kestrel which is a small bird of prey landed nearby. The RX100-6 is also something to think about, as it is a little less than the RX100-7. That's good to know about the depth of field control being better with the longer lens.

 

It looks like you are getting some great shots with the RX100 Edo!

 

 

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3 minutes ago, NYCat said:

I keep the wrist strap on and also have the grip for easier steady holding. Holding steady was my main problem when I got it.

 

Paulette

 

Thanks Paulette, yes I imagine being so small it is a bit more difficult at first after a DSLR. It's like the DSLR is more solid and therefore less easy to move around when shooting. It seems like such a nifty little camera.

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42 minutes ago, Sally R said:

I was thinking of the RX100 more as an additional camera for spontaneous moments when I'm not carrying the DSLR, such as candid street photography or out on a walk but wanting to travel light. 

 

 

I suspected that might be the case, but I saw no hint of you looking for an additional stock subject on your 4 pages. To sum up: I feel the lost of an f-stop or so is not going to be an important factor, but the 70mm max will occasionally be a problem. My RX100-6 is out of order at the moment.

 

I would love to expand my subject choice. Without a car, that's hard. And the only thing I really know about birds is they can fly and I can't. 🙂

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, sb photos said:

 

I can't recollect my VII coming with a neck strap, things have changed. I rely on the wrist strap (more of a thin loose loop), the grip and taking good care of the camera. So far I've never dropped a camera, and only one lens into a Welsh stream long ago.

 

Maybe the neck strap came with the Sony case that I bought at the time. Not sure . 

Edited by ReeRay

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I find it is easier to handle the RX100 cameras with the hand grip.

 

Allan

 

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2 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

I suspected that might be the case, but I saw no hint of you looking for an additional stock subject on your 4 pages. To sum up: I feel the lost of an f-stop or so is not going to be an important factor, but the 70mm max will occasionally be a problem. My RX100-6 is out of order at the moment.

 

I would love to expand my subject choice. Without a car, that's hard. And the only thing I really know about birds is they can fly and I can't. 🙂

 

Yes it is harder without a car Ed. I feel lucky to have one, as I can head off easily to different locations for photography. My brother manages without a car though, and I don't think has any intention of getting one anytime soon. I guess one advantage of being on foot with photography might be that you notice more details in your environment and you create a thorough catalogue of images of your local area. You certainly already have many great pictures of Liverpool. I hope the RX100-6 is back in order soon!

 

I am planning to expand my images beyond my favourite nature subjects into the future. I had planned to earlier, especially with regard to street photography and events, but the lockdown put that on the back-burner. However, they have just lifted most restrictions here so life may be getting back to a sort-of normal, and I should have opportunities for more variety of subjects.

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52 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

I find it is easier to handle the RX100 cameras with the hand grip.

 

Allan

 

Thanks Allan. I'll certainly get the grip if it feels a bit too slippery or unsteady without it.

 

After weighing up which model to get, I'm now going to postpone it for a bit, as I'm starting to lean towards the RX100-7 which is more expensive and I will need a bit more money first. Hopefully I will sell a few Alamy pics that might help pay for it 🙂

 

Thanks to you and everyone above for your helpful comments. It is much appreciated.

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2 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

To sum up: I feel the lost of an f-stop or so is not going to be an important factor, but the 70mm max will occasionally be a problem.

 

I meant to say thanks for this too Ed. I'm leaning towards the RX100-7 now, as I probably will get a bit frustrated at times with a 70mm max. I've been looking at sample images from various people using the RX100-7 and it looks like a very capable little camera. I read that there is good eye tracking in it which is good for animal photography, and that appeals to me too.

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Look at the comparison between the 6 and the 7 in the data MDM sent you. Maybe the less expensive 6 would work for you.

 

The depth-of-field control in these little mirrorless cameras is not great. It will frustrate you. 

 

I suspect your brother is a bit younger than me. There's no way I could cover great distances on foot as I once did. I would love to have access to Village England. When I lived in Oxfordshire in the '80s, I had a car. In Western Australia, I would need a car, a small aeroplane, a helicopter, a van, and maybe a houseboat. 

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5 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

Look at the comparison between the 6 and the 7 in the data MDM sent you. Maybe the less expensive 6 would work for you.

 

The depth-of-field control in these little mirrorless cameras is not great. It will frustrate you. 

 

I suspect your brother is a bit younger than me. There's no way I could cover great distances on foot as I once did. I would love to have access to Village England. When I lived in Oxfordshire in the '80s, I had a car. In Western Australia, I would need a car, a small aeroplane, a helicopter, a van, and maybe a houseboat. 

 

I knew the hovercraft was invented for a reason!! 😀

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10 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

Look at the comparison between the 6 and the 7 in the data MDM sent you. Maybe the less expensive 6 would work for you.

 

The depth-of-field control in these little mirrorless cameras is not great. It will frustrate you. 

 

I suspect your brother is a bit younger than me. There's no way I could cover great distances on foot as I once did. I would love to have access to Village England. When I lived in Oxfordshire in the '80s, I had a car. In Western Australia, I would need a car, a small aeroplane, a helicopter, a van, and maybe a houseboat. 

 

Thanks Ed, yes had another look at the data MDM sent. Version 6 may be a good option. There are end of financial year sales here on cameras at the moment that end in a couple of days, and that was adding to my sense of urgency in making a decision. However, I've decided to wait for a bit to think it through more, rather than rushing into deciding. It will probably be better to do so too when I have a bit more money. I do really love the idea of this little camera and can see myself getting one sometime in the next 6 months.

 

Yes Western Australia is truly vast, and all the forms of transport you mention, along with Mr Standfast's idea of a hovercraft, would be great travel options 😀. All our family holidays when I was a kid were to towns in WA, so I got used to long hours of car travel back then. However, I prefer driving shorter distances at a time myself now, preferably no more than 3-4 hours in a day. I also want to stop all the time and take photos!

 

It would be great if you got some opportunities to head out into Village England. I wonder if there are opportunities by bus, but I guess still important at the moment to think about where best to go based on what is happening with Covid-19. I saw a story on the news last night showing the beaches packed in the UK!

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