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Are You Shooting More or Less in the Lockdown?


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23 hours ago, The Blinking Eye said:

As a motion picture filmmaker, I can't figure out how else you would decribe a "film shoot". Or how you would not "shoot film". There aren't really any other options. I guess you could say "We are filming today", which sounds a bit less professional.

 

I agree. I've seen many an interview with well-known filmmakers and actors, all using the term 'shooting a film' or talking about 'the shoot' . We all know and understand what they mean. English and other languages use metaphors. It is part of how humans make sense of the world. So people will say they are going to 'hit the road' meaning they are going off on a journey or going someplace in their car. No one feels sorry for the road and thinks they are not being 'grown up'. Also, with the nature of editing in film and photography today, the word shoot probably helps delineate the time spent with the camera from the time spent editing. If you talk about 'making' photographs, people may think you are talking about composites in Photoshop. In film, it helps to separate out the screenwriting stage from the time spent filming with a camera from the time spent editing. They are all different actions and processes.

 

It is quite likely the term shoot in photography does derive originally from hunting. Given we were all hunter-gatherers once it is probably in our ancestral DNA to go out and try to capture something, and perhaps photography today is just modern-day hunting and gathering. Some photographers are more 'machine gun-like', rapidly firing away, others are more slow and methodical. I know I fall into the latter category. I was once at a beautiful nature spot by the ocean where I'd spent 7 hours having a wonderful time exploring coves and rocky hills. At sunset I got out my tripod to capture the sunset. There I was in meditative absorption when a guy screeched to a halt in his ute, jumped out and spent just five minutes running around rapidly shooting with a telephoto trying to get sunset shots, before jumping back in his ute and screeching away at speed, probably to get to the next parking spot to shoot some more.

 

I guess like a skilled hunter, we seek to use precision to capture an image. The closest I get to this would be trying to capture birds in flight where I use bursts of the shutter hoping that one turns out. But I would never dream of harming an actual bird ever, and I know people would know what I was talking about in the context of photography.

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Thanks Edo 😊 Yes I will keep shooting away. I've been finding all sorts of bugs in the backyard recently. Will hopefully get time to upload some pics in the next week or so. Hope all is going well for you in Liverpool and that you can solve the issues with your Sony RX100/6.

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Nothing much is going well in Liverpool or anywhere else, Sally. 

 

I came upon a dead Herring Gull today. No sign of how it died. I hope it was not starvation or a fight over food. I like these birds. They are unpopular in the UK because of their aggressiveness  Still, I like them, although I wish they would go out to sea and find a herring instead of waiting for someone to drop a chip.

 

 

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5 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

I came upon a dead Herring Gull today. No sign of how it died. I hope it was not starvation or a fight over food. I like these birds. They are unpopular in the UK because of their aggressiveness  Still, I like them, although I wish they would go out to sea and find a herring instead of waiting for someone to drop a chip.

 

 

 

Hmmm... My neighbours have a dove-cot, and about a dozen snow-white pigeons... except that they've been dying off recently with some respiratory disease.

 

The air itself is trying to kill us...

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Less and different. I'm stuck in Kent and  haven't been to London since the start of the new era, so doing no news (apart from 1 almost news image yesterday) and lots of garden birds - I know for a fact I am not alone in that!

For ages I have been meaning to do more video and I am finally doing that now - mostly mad woodpigeons. I've never done enough video to have an idea of whether it is really worthwhile so this could be useful.

I am doing more really boring studio stuff. It's what I usually resort to when the weather has been bad for a LONG time, but it does sell.

I've also written a couple of piano duets - not expecting to make a fortune from that though.

So I am shooting, snapping, photographing, recording, making and doing anything I can really.

 

Edited by Phil Robinson
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8 hours ago, sb photos said:

 

I can only remember one piece of photo kit from the 1960's with a similarity to weapon shooting, the Zenit Photosniper with the Tair 300mm lens, see http://camera-wiki.org/wiki/Zenit_Photosniper

 

Ah the Fotosnaipr!

Ha my Novoflex 600mm looks a lot like a bazooka. 😁

youtube

on sonyrumours (with a french accent)

(I have both versions with a 400 and a 600mm plus a shoulder rest, a bit like the Sniper. Which makes it look even worse.)

 

We have the same terminology here. Both the English shoot or photo shoot as well as een foto or een plaatje schieten (shooting an image).

Because very few people here have guns there's no real connotation of firing a gun.

Personally I do not use shooting in connection with photography, but when I'm about with one of my super long selfie sticks, I use fishing for images a lot.

(Still waiting for a German tourist to wish me Petri Heil! The traditional German fisherman's greeting: Hail Saint Peter. To which I can then answer Petri Dank! )

 

wim

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19 hours ago, The Blinking Eye said:

 

I love that. I can see the parallels, like patience, precision, observation and knowing when to shoot.

 

Also, a lot of camera technology was developed by the US military for war recording purposes in the early 20th century. So the history of camera machinery and war are inextricably linked.

 

Steve F made some interesting points above. Both my parents were British, and I spent my early childhood in the British West Indies and in England. It was not until we moved to Canada and I fell under the spell of American culture -- cowboy programs on TV, comic books, movies, etc. -- that I started playing with toy guns and became somewhat obsessed with them as many boys of my generation did. I also became fascinated by the American military for some reason. Thankfully, all that disappeared later on, but I can see how someone brought up in the UK or another country where guns are not such a big part of the culture would not necessarily connect "shooting" with a camera to shooting with a gun.

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4 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

Wim, do you own both a Sony RX100/6 and V? I remember we were both getting them at the same, when I was in Montreal. 

 

Edo

 

Yes.

 

wim

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4 hours ago, John Mitchell said:

 

Steve F made some interesting points above. Both my parents were British, and I spent my early childhood in the British West Indies and in England. It was not until we moved to Canada and I fell under the spell of American culture -- cowboy programs on TV, comic books, movies, etc. -- that I started playing with toy guns and became somewhat obsessed with them as many boys of my generation did. I also became fascinated by the American military for some reason. Thankfully, all that disappeared later on, but I can see how someone brought up in the UK or another country where guns are not such a big part of the culture would not necessarily connect "shooting" with a camera to shooting with a gun.

 

I dunno. It never occurred to me to connect shooting a camera with a shooting gun until I went to graduate school and read all the theory about it. Guns are not in my consciousness on a regular basis. I have never touched one and rarely ever see one in person. But I'm a girl who was raised on the teachings of Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr., despite having also been a child of American culture and all its glorification of violence.

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1 minute ago, The Blinking Eye said:

 

Yeah, I have to disagree about this "totally different mindset". There are indeed a bunch of gun nuts in the USA and I suppose they think about guns a lot. They are as foreign to me as they are to you, so painting with such broad brush strokes as North America vs. the UK is a bit silly, from my perspective.


I agree with you for the most part but I definitely do not use the word shoot in a situation where it could be misunderstood.  I once did a portrait shoot of Hillary Clinton and when I arrived, I was smart enough not to say, “I am here to shoot Hillary Clinton”.  

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4 hours ago, Michael Ventura said:


I agree with you for the most part but I definitely do not use the word shoot in a situation where it could be misunderstood.  I once did a portrait shoot of Hillary Clinton and when I arrived, I was smart enough not to say, “I am here to shoot Hillary Clinton”.  

 

Was she particularly photogenic? When I shot photos of Elizabeth Warren at a rally, I was kind of blown away how photogenic she was. She looked perfect in every picture and was not even posing. I had not really thought about her as having star power, but understood that quality much better after photographing her.

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8 hours ago, The Blinking Eye said:

It never occurred to me to connect shooting a camera with a shooting gun until I went to graduate school and read all the theory about it.

 

I think that's probably true for most people across the world, whether in the US or here in Australia or elsewhere. I haven't read the theory about it, but I'm guessing the words we use such as shooting or talking about the shutter firing etc, relate to word origins that are found in other terminologies. We might say that a car backfired or a motorcycle was shooting past us on the freeway, and we know what people mean because the context tells us.

 

Here there is a photography workshop business attached to a leading camera retailer called Shoot Photography Workshops. I have never had any association in my mind between this and anything to do with guns. It is only on reflection as a result of reading this thread that I'm thinking about it. But I do find it interesting thinking about how going out and taking photos might have similarities to what it is like hunting and gathering, where we use all our senses to sense what is around us and notice fine details in the landscape. For example, in spring I am always out photographing wildflowers, which to me feels like a form of gathering (that gets stored first on my camera and then my computer). So going way back before guns were invented, photography perhaps shares some of the perceptual skills and orientations that are used to subsist in an environment.

 

I probably think like this because I do so much of my photography out in nature, and I'm always noticing the seasons, the angle of light, what the clouds are doing and what shapes they are, whether it is windy or not, which birds, animals and insects are active, and so on. All of those things affect my decisions and orientation to my environment, and I think I extend this to doing photography in human-built environments as well.

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19 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

Nothing much is going well in Liverpool or anywhere else, Sally. 

 

I came upon a dead Herring Gull today. No sign of how it died. I hope it was not starvation or a fight over food. I like these birds. They are unpopular in the UK because of their aggressiveness  Still, I like them, although I wish they would go out to sea and find a herring instead of waiting for someone to drop a chip.

 

Ah yes that is true Ed. 'Going well' are probably not the right words. Possibly 'going ok' or 'surviving' are better.

 

We have aggressive gulls too called Silver Gulls. They sound very similar. I too have hoped they will go and catch their own food for a change, and wondered if they might learn to do this while people have been in lockdown. People are starting to emerge now as some restrictions have been lifted. There was something on the news the other night about whale watching businesses being in trouble because of the virus and a lack of international travellers which is likely to persist for sometime. That is really bad news for those businesses, but I also wonder if the whales are like "thank goodness those humans aren't coming and staring at us everyday!", while the gulls are thinking "where are our food providers!".

 

Then again, whales sometimes seem to enjoy the interaction. There was also a story on the news about a grouper in an aquarium getting depressed, moping and not eating because he was missing daily human interactions with no visitors coming anymore https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-05-12/sad-fish-missing-human-interaction-at-aquariums/12235054. I've read about human-grouper interactions and connections before, including in a book by Albert Falco who spent years on Jacques Cousteau's boat, and in a book called Blueback by novelist Tim Winton. They seem to be quite emotional fish who bond with people.

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2 hours ago, Sally R said:

But I do find it interesting thinking about how going out and taking photos might have similarities to what it is like hunting and gathering,

It's nice the way this discussion has ranged beyond any perceived criticism of the  term 'shooting' with respect to photography. I don't use the term much myself but I don't mind others using it, though I certainly wouldn't go anywhere near The Pope or Hillary Clinton with a Zenit Photosniper, even if it was still in its custom suitcase. I think your analogy with hunting and gathering is the link really, there's a rather good French photography magazine called 'Chasseur d'Images', hunting for images of course, and we all do that. Similarly I don't do fishing but after a particularly fruitless day out photographing I comfort myself with the thought that a fisherman can sit by the river all day and not catch anything, and that's not seen as a wasted day either.

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1 minute ago, Harry Harrison said:

Similarly I don't do fishing but after a particularly fruitless day out photographing I comfort myself with the thought that a fisherman can sit by the river all day and not catch anything, and that's not seen as a wasted day either.

 

Ah that is so true! Yes I always enjoy being in the outdoors even if I come away with no images I'm super happy with. I remember as a teenager watching fishermen out on the reef near where I grew up, thinking I can't wait to be retired some day so I can just do something like that ( I was longing to be at retirement age at 16!). I quite often come across people fishing when I'm out at sunrise and sunset for photography, by the ocean or river, so I think we definitely share something similar.

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28 minutes ago, Sally R said:

 

Ah yes that is true Ed. 'Going well' are probably not the right words. Possibly 'going ok' or 'surviving' are better.

 

We have aggressive gulls too called Silver Gulls. They sound very similar. I too have hoped they will go and catch their own food for a change, and wondered if they might learn to do this while people have been in lockdown. People are starting to emerge now as some restrictions have been lifted. There was something on the news the other night about whale watching businesses being in trouble because of the virus and a lack of international travellers which is likely to persist for sometime. That is really bad news for those businesses, but I also wonder if the whales are like "thank goodness those humans aren't coming and staring at us everyday!", while the gulls are thinking "where are our food providers!".

 

Then again, whales sometimes seem to enjoy the interaction. There was also a story on the news about a grouper in an aquarium getting depressed, moping and not eating because he was missing daily human interactions with no visitors coming anymore https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-05-12/sad-fish-missing-human-interaction-at-aquariums/12235054. I've read about human-grouper interactions and connections before, including in a book by Albert Falco who spent years on Jacques Cousteau's boat, and in a book called Blueback by novelist Tim Winton. They seem to be quite emotional fish who bond with people.

 

Dolphins and whales have really complex interaction with humans. Other fish? Maybe. Read Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea, his best book, I think. 

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I came to view this discussion expecting it to be about "Are You Shooting More or Less in the Lockdown?" rather than semantics. 
Might I suggest that getting worked up about the language used is a bit like those who take more interest in equipment than actually taking / making / shooting / forging / snapping / creating photos of things?

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To answer the original question....Shooting more...

From the first day of the lockdown I felt it was important to document what was happening.

Restricted by the State of Emergency laws I could only shoot at home, out the window, off the balcony and on occasional trips to the shops I took my camera but couldn't 

stop anywhere for more than a minute or two without risking a heavy fine from the boys in blue, but I made some photos that record my experience of that time.

Since 23rd April I got authorisation from the Adeje council to go out and photograph in the municipality which has been an eerie experience, walking through deserted touristic areas felt like being in a sci fi movie where everyone has vanished!  

Anyway I believe I've captured some unique moments and scenes which will form part of an archive of a very strange time.

This last week the de-escalation of restrictions has begun and I'm continuing to go out a couple of times each week to document the progress.

So I've shot about 6000 images and about 800 images have gone on Alamy since 15th March when the lockdown began.

 

Phil

 

 

 

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The real change for me is the "way" I'm shooting. Previously I was all for 28mm-35mm focal length and getting in amongst people and street markets, events etc. 

 

Not anymore I ain't. Social distancing is the call of the day now. 

 

It's been an 85mm and stood off and I figure it may be quite some time before I return to my previous modus operandi. 

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On 14/05/2020 at 09:19, Thyrsis said:

 

Back in the commercial photography days we had a large coved studio. When the whole room was painted white it made you feel quite strange because you couldn’t tell where the floor ended and the wall started! Very disorientating! 

Repainting my 1 metre cove was bad enough especially the second coat, just could not tell where the back was.

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1 hour ago, Bill Allsopp said:

Repainting my 1 metre cove was bad enough especially the second coat, just could not tell where the back was.

 

By the time we left the studio and had to smash down the cove the layer of paint was at least 1 cm thick, it had been painted different colours so many times!! 

On a completely different note, we had some amazing parties in there. Each Christmas all our clients, staff and friends would hope to be on the invite list! 

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9 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

Dolphins and whales have really complex interaction with humans. Other fish? Maybe. Read Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea, his best book, I think. 

 

An Australian scientist has done some interesting research on fish. They are probably a lot smarter than we assume.

 

I'm not a Hemingway fan, but I did like The Old Man and the Sea.

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