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Has anyone else received a letter from a Brad Arkin, who says he's the Chief Security Officer at Adobe? This letter (not an email) refers to nonspecific events that may cause me security problems and warns that I might be the target of fraud. But . . . the letter itself could be a fraud, since they suggest I sign up for some security coverage . . . and that would no doubt require that I give them a lot of data. 

 

This Brad Arkin does not show up on Wikipedia. It's hard to tell where the possible threat is here.

 

Ed

Edited by Ed Rooney

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I got one Ed. I just ignored it, I had changed passwords and user names. But what did surprise was getting a new credit card (from the cc company) sent to me to replace the one that had been used with adobe saying they had received information that the old one might be under threat

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Send a copy of the email with the headers include to Adobe. Sometimes the big companies have an email just for suspected fraud and spam.

I did not receive that email.

 

L

Edited by Linda

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I received the original email from Adobe about the security breach and then changed my passwords and notified my bank that my details may have been stolen. I think that at the time I read somewhere on the Adobe site that they would notify me by letter if my details where involved, I haven't had a letter yet ( fingers crossed)

 

But I know what you mean Ed about the letter being a fraud itself.

 

when I first got the Adobe email I thought along the same lines, it just seems it is getting more and more difficult to see what is fraudulent on the internet these days.....I would line all of these internet  fraudsters up against a wall and... well you know the rest  ;)

Edited by Steve B

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The first place to look about something like this is Adobe's own website where it is revealed that Brad Arkin is indeed Adobe's Chief Security Officer. He is responsible for the following security announcement: http://blogs.adobe.com/conversations/2013/10/important-customer-security-announcement.html

 

However, I'm betting that the letter Ed received is not from the real Brad Arkin if there is a requirement to provide confidential data back (I note that Ed was not very specific there and may have just been surmising that he would have to provide data). Reading this again I would guess that the letter is actually authentic assuming it does not ask you to provide confidential data.

Edited by MDM

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I got it. The offer is for free credit monitoring from Experian for one year. I don't know how much that usually costs. That would require giving information just as it does to get your credit report from Experian, Equifax and TransUnion. i don't think this is a fraud. The information would be given to Experian -- not Adobe.

 

Paulette

Edited by NYCat

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I got it. The offer is for free credit monitoring from Experian for one year. I don't know how much that usually costs. That would require giving information just as it does to get your credit report from Experian, Equifax and TransUnion. i don't think this is a fraud. The information would be given to Experian -- not Adobe.

 

Paulette

 

That sounds like Adobe are making money from selling your details onto Experian, using the recent security breach to frighten you into buying their services.

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Thank you all for responding, I appreciate it.

 

I'm thinking this morning (before coffee) that Paulette has it right. I tried to get onto the Adobe site last night but could not. And the sign-in would not let me change my password. I've had way too much digital contact this month, what with Apple's new OS, my new iPad mini and this Adobe situation. 

 

If this concerns a credit card, credit cards are insured. I never use my ATM card for anything but getting cash out of my bank's ATM. 

 

Thanks again, people.

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I got it. The offer is for free credit monitoring from Experian for one year. I don't know how much that usually costs. That would require giving information just as it does to get your credit report from Experian, Equifax and TransUnion. i don't think this is a fraud. The information would be given to Experian -- not Adobe.

 

Paulette

 

That sounds like Adobe are making money from selling your details onto Experian, using the recent security breach to frighten you into buying their services.

 

FREE for one year. I, not Adobe, would be giving my information. I've no doubt there would be an attempt to have me continue on for their usual fee but I don't think Adobe is up to no good.

 

Paulette

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I got it. The offer is for free credit monitoring from Experian for one year. I don't know how much that usually costs. That would require giving information just as it does to get your credit report from Experian, Equifax and TransUnion. i don't think this is a fraud. The information would be given to Experian -- not Adobe.

 

Paulette

 

That sounds like Adobe are making money from selling your details onto Experian, using the recent security breach to frighten you into buying their services.

 

FREE for one year. I, not Adobe, would be giving my information. I've no doubt there would be an attempt to have me continue on for their usual fee but I don't think Adobe is up to no good.

 

Paulette

 

Thanks for clearing it up Paulette but I still think Adobe will be on a commision for every customer that registers with Experian.

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Right, Paulette . . . but it was Adobe who was hacked, not you or me. Maybe they should sign up for Experian. I have Kaspersky and I'm hesitant to add protection to protection. 

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They are paying the fee for the year so I doubt that they will make any money from this. Maybe it protects them from being sued if someone has problems due to their security breach but I'm not worried that they are ripping me off. Not that I am buying Photoshop these days but Lightroom is certainly reasonable -- as is Elements.

 

Paulette

  • Upvote 1

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Right, Paulette . . . but it was Adobe who was hacked, not you or me. Maybe they should sign up for Experian. I have Kaspersky and I'm hesitant to add protection to protection. 

 

Experian is not a computer program. It's one of the three companies who keep track of our credit records.

 

Paulette

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Best thing to do if you're worried about this sort of thing is just try and log into the website. It'll prompt you to change your password due to the new security password complexity. Singing up for Experian is a nightmare once you want to cancel it. Plus your Adobe account has nothing to do with Experian unless Adobe are holding payment information (which they shouldn't be) and someone got a hold of your info and was duplicating your life. Then you should sign up to Experian to check that there has been no loans, credit cards, or bank account opened up that you don't know about. 

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Best thing to do if you're worried about this sort of thing is just try and log into the website. It'll prompt you to change your password due to the new security password complexity. Singing up for Experian is a nightmare once you want to cancel it. Plus your Adobe account has nothing to do with Experian unless Adobe are holding payment information (which they shouldn't be) and someone got a hold of your info and was duplicating your life. Then you should sign up to Experian to check that there has been no loans, credit cards, or bank account opened up that you don't know about. 

 

Nobody in their right mind would want to duplicate my life.

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Right, Paulette . . . but it was Adobe who was hacked, not you or me. Maybe they should sign up for Experian. I have Kaspersky and I'm hesitant to add protection to protection. 

 

Experian is not a computer program. It's one of the three companies who keep track of our credit records.

 

Paulette

 

Oh sure . . . I knew that, Paulette.  :wacko:

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I got this from the cc company I had used to update Lightroom from adobe online.

 

why you're getting a new card 

 

We have been advised that your current C card account information may have been compromised. This incident did not involve any *************** card systems, and there is no evidence that an unauthorized individual is using the account number. To reduce the possibility of fraud occurring on your account , we are issuing a new card .

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I would recommend some due diligence on Experian--there are some very, very interesting discussions on Experian occuring right now on several forums. In turn of course, all such discussions should also be afforded due diligence . . . bloody hell, where does a poor boy stop? :-)

 

dd

Edited by dustydingo
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Adobe got hacked very badly a little while ago (see recent posts at https://krebsonsecurity.com/ for more information), so you can expect lots of this kind of e-mail.  This is just the prologue to what will inevitably be a long episode.  Those articles reveal another connection to Experian who were smart enough to buy a company that sold information to a ring of ID thieves.  And today the US Congress, always on the leading edge, wants to have a chat with Experian.

 

This is a time to be extremely careful responding to e-mails with links.  The most successful of the various hacker attacks is "social engineering" which is based on persuading you to give up information willingly, rather than exploiting a technological flaw or prowess to extract it from your computer.

 

Regards

Lionel

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I live in a huge highrise condo and we frequently have substitute mail carriers. I have had too much mail lost thru the years which includes credit card statements,bank statements and the like.

Every 90 days I log onto Experian(it's free) to add a credit alert to my file and view my credit report. I don't get informed by them if something changes,but my alert is there in case someone did try and apply for  credit in my name,I would notice it or the credit card company or bank would have to call me before opening an account.

 

L

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Notice how Facebook and other social media sites ask the same types of questions they want you to fill as does your bank and credit card?

 

I make up different stuff for my financial institutions and keep all in an encrypted file.

 

L

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Slightly OT, but associated:  Just out of interest for those of you who are unaware, CallCredit, the smallest of the three UK credit-checking companies, has a totally free version of its credit-checking service called Noddle.

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Not off-topic, Danny . . . just off-shore for us Yanks.  :)

Edited by Ed Rooney

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