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1 hour ago, John Richmond said:

I hav'nt seen my chin since January 1971.  Lord knows what's under the beard.

 

I know what's under mine, I'm more scared about what's IN it . . .

 

DD

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51 minutes ago, NYCat said:

 

Uh oh. Maybe it's a good thing that I have no cat-sitting business until people start traveling again. I don't think I'll try to sanitize my own kitty. He does it himself anyway-- though I've seen it pointed out that cats clean themselves with spit.

 

Paulette

 

!!!!! . . . more coffee coughed out through my nose, but in a nice way . . . sorry Paulette, but when I got to a particular part of your post an image of the dear, late Mollie Sugden leapt into my mind's eye . . . older UK residents may know what I mean 🙂 🙂 🙂

 

DD

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Ohhh. Tell me. Tell me. British humor (humour) is the best. Also maybe the silliest.

 

Paulette

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13 minutes ago, dustydingo said:

 

!!!!! . . . more coffee coughed out through my nose, but in a nice way . . . sorry Paulette, but when I got to a particular part of your post an image of the dear, late Mollie Sugden leapt into my mind's eye . . . older UK residents may know what I mean 🙂 🙂 🙂

 

DD

She said kitty, not pussy.

Paulette, try this. I believe the slang term is also used in the US, if the quotes about your president are correct.

 

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Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

She said kitty, not pussy.

 

FFS Mark, lighten up please . . . I know that, all I said was Mollie sprang to mind . . . sheesh . . .

 

DD

Edited by dustydingo

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That was great. Giggling away here. Like I said --- silly.

 

Paulette

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Posted (edited)

Like us, Paulette, cats do the best they can. 

 

I once had a pet cat. Nuppy was her name. The name was on her collar. She belonged to a family up the road in Woodstock, Oxfordshire. They didn't let her enter their home, so she was stuck outside in the weather. One night she came to my window as I was watching TV. Wait, not TV. I was watching wood burning in my fireplace,

 

Nuppy made a sound with her paw on the window and when I turned a meow that I could not hear. It was snowing, so I opened the window to let her in. She sat there for a minute with her cat's attitude that said, "What do you want? You don't think I want to come in, do you?" Then she would give me a musical meow that could melt your heart and jump through the window into the room. She was a cat, after all, not a dog.

 

After carefully inspecting the premises, she would sit in my lap and I would rub her back. At a certain point, Nuppy would turn and bite me on the hand. But not hard. But I would get upset with her. Later, Desmond Morris gave me a copy of his book, Cat Watching, where I learned that the gentle bite was because Nuppy was reminded of being a kitten by my rubbing and that had her think me as her mother. 

 

I let her move in that winter. And I found that I enjoyed her company. She in turn occasionally killed a vole, and once a bird, and offered them to  me to share.

 

I may have told this story before. If so, I'm sorry. 

 

On these virus-ridden days, I've been thinking of Nuppy. That was over 30 years ago, but I miss her still. She was not a dog. But she was a very lovable cat. 

 

Edo

 

Edited by Ed Rooney
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Cats can be a great comfort. My current cat also bites at the end of a petting session. (Perhaps a poor choice of words on this forum). Something about getting too excited. (Another poor choice of words). The poor thing only has four teeth left and none of them meet so it is definitely a love-bite.

 

Paulette

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16 minutes ago, dustydingo said:

 

FFS Mark, lighten up please . . . I know that, all I said was Mollie sprang to mind . . . sheesh . . .

 

DD

Eh? That was pretty light, I thought. Paulette liked it anyway.

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1 minute ago, NYCat said:

a petting session.

Oo er missus.

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1 minute ago, spacecadet said:

Eh? That was pretty light, I thought. Paulette liked it anyway.

 

Mate, I'm refering to you pointing out that she didn't say pussy . . . like, really? . . . lighten up mate, it was a soft, gentle memory that was prompted by what Paulette wrote and I shared it.

 

The degree of combative reflexes herein is getting a tad tiresome IMO, but of course YEMD.

 

DD

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Was thinking that today I will give my cat, Bon Jovi, a bath. while he has few teeth he is no "Pussy."

Sorry, could not resist.  We do need some humor, even if a bit low.

 

Chuck

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3 hours ago, Chuck Nacke said:

 

The above comment is why, again in my opinion, there are too many who "dabble" in photography and play PHOTOJORNALIST.

This is a VERY serious story (issue) and anyone interacting in public HAS TO know what they are doing and anyone out making images

needs to be very careful.

 

Good, Honest, Well captioned images of COVID-19 are important for the human race and I am disappointed that any "Photographer" would mention

license fees.

 

Chuck Nacke

 

Chuck,

you know nothing about me, who I am or what I've done in life.

 

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56 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

I once had a pet cat. Nuppy was her name. The name was on her collar.

 

Edo

 

 

Shame I thought the first line of your post was going to be a rhyme.

 

I once had a pet cat, Nuppy was her name,

The name was on her collar, ----------?

 

C'mon Edo you can do it.

 

Allan

 

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1 hour ago, NYCat said:

Cats can be a great comfort. My current cat also bites at the end of a petting session. (Perhaps a poor choice of words on this forum). Something about getting too excited. (Another poor choice of words). The poor thing only has four teeth left and none of them meet so it is definitely a love-bite.

 

Paulette

During my times as a cat owner..err...while being owned by a cat, I quickly found out not to scratch its belly!  The different cats, every one, would roll over and offer its belly. Woe is the person who complies. I would get a few rubs or scratches in, then my hand would suddenly be attacked by claws and fangs. Yes, fangs. We both would hold that position, because the damage worsened if I jerked away. No, no, don’t jerk away! Instead of only claw holes, I got long trenches of blood!

After a minute or so of immobility by both parties, teeth and fangs would slowly be withdrawn.

So whatever you do, don’t let a cat draw you in. You’ll be sorry, and you’ll be applying your own spit to the claw holes for pain relief.

I learned this lesson when I was seven, and never forgot it. Well...I occasionally got suckered in, but only once with each new cat through the years.

What in  “don’t scratch a cat’s belly did I not understand?”

Betty

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4 hours ago, Michael Photo said:

 

Chuck,

you know nothing about me, who I am or what I've done in life.

 

No,  I do not know anything about you, never said that I did and you did not quote everything I wrote.

I was responding in general and specifically to what you had written concerning monetary returns of

images of the worlds #1 concern and news .

 

Chuck

 

 

 

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When I was in Live News, I had several sales. But the bigger sales came later as traditional stock. Photographers need to be thinking about things like history and medical textbooks, etc. As for exposing one’s self, it’s pretty easy to practice social distancing outside these days. I also keep a small bottle of hand sanitizer with me. Here are a few I’ve grabbed over the last couple of weeks. https://www.alamy.com/portfolio/todd-bannor-alamy-portfolio/covid-19.html

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8 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

During my times as a cat owner..err...while being owned by a cat, I quickly found out not to scratch its belly!  The different cats, every one, would roll over and offer its belly. Woe is the person who complies. I would get a few rubs or scratches in, then my hand would suddenly be attacked by claws and fangs. Yes, fangs. We both would hold that position, because the damage worsened if I jerked away. No, no, don’t jerk away! Instead of only claw holes, I got long trenches of blood!

After a minute or so of immobility by both parties, teeth and fangs would slowly be withdrawn.

So whatever you do, don’t let a cat draw you in. You’ll be sorry, and you’ll be applying your own spit to the claw holes for pain relief.

I learned this lesson when I was seven, and never forgot it. Well...I occasionally got suckered in, but only once with each new cat through the years.

What in  “don’t scratch a cat’s belly did I not understand?”

Betty

 

They show you their bellies to show that they trust you, not to have you come in with fingers.  I've got two that are mine, one a gift from another expat (marvelous British woman, retired nurse), the second the first owner and I decided if she wanted to move in with me, she was a free cat, third, the owner love her little cat, and we do time sharing. 

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I've lived with dogs over the years and for them it has always meant "scratch my belly please" accompanied by enthusiastic tail wagging. But yes cats are different and I've gotten nipped when I've assumed what they do is similar to a dog. Apparently they also like pawing you with their claws because this is what they did to their mothers as kittens to get milk.

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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Shame I thought the first line of your post was going to be a rhyme.

 

I once had a pet cat, Nuppy was her name,

The name was on her collar, ----------?

 

C'mon Edo you can do it.

 

Allan

 

1. she really was quite tame.

2. she gave me something to blame

3. She played a standoffish game

4. She soon had me to claim

5 she was a long-haired dame

C’mon, Ed

Edited by Betty LaRue

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Posted (edited)
15 hours ago, Sally R said:

Apparently they also like pawing you with their claws because this is what they did to their mothers as kittens to get milk.

I ended up with fluffy patches on my sweaters that way.

Edited by spacecadet

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On 27/03/2020 at 05:02, dustydingo said:

 

If you truly believe those sort of reactions are restricted to those you might stereotype as Sun readers, you are demonstrably mistaken.

 

DD

 

I guess humour is another casualty of these times.

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I don't write poetry. Or at least I don't admit to it. 

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On 27/03/2020 at 15:26, Ed Rooney said:

Like us, Paulette, cats do the best they can. 

 

I once had a pet cat. Nuppy was her name. The name was on her collar. She belonged to a family up the road in Woodstock, Oxfordshire. They didn't let her enter their home, so she was stuck outside in the weather. One night she came to my window as I was watching TV. Wait, not TV. I was watching wood burning in my fireplace,

 

Nuppy made a sound with her paw on the window and when I turned a meow that I could not hear. It was snowing, so I opened the window to let her in. She sat there for a minute with her cat's attitude that said, "What do you want? You don't think I want to come in, do you?" Then she would give me a musical meow that could melt your heart and jump through the window into the room. She was a cat, after all, not a dog.

 

After carefully inspecting the premises, she would sit in my lap and I would rub her back. At a certain point, Nuppy would turn and bite me on the hand. But not hard. But I would get upset with her. Later, Desmond Morris gave me a copy of his book, Cat Watching, where I learned that the gentle bite was because Nuppy was reminded of being a kitten by my rubbing and that had her think me as her mother. 

 

I let her move in that winter. And I found that I enjoyed her company. She in turn occasionally killed a vole, and once a bird, and offered them to  me to share.

 

I may have told this story before. If so, I'm sorry. 

 

On these virus-ridden days, I've been thinking of Nuppy. That was over 30 years ago, but I miss her still. She was not a dog. But she was a very lovable cat. 

 

Edo

 

Cat’s have such character. Our Rita, as a tiny kitten,  came to live with us in Oxford in 1987 and lived to 18 years of age. We named her after a waitress at the Hard Rock Cafe in London. She had five kittens , two of which we kept but sadly she outlived both of them. She was lovable but also very feisty. Come bedtime she would plant herself firmly on our bed and we would have to scoop her up in a towel to remove her from the room. When we took her to the vet he would put elbow length gauntlets on to give her a shot! She always knew if we were going on holiday and would go awol the morning we were supposed to take her to the cattery!  We took to locking her in the night before. Still miss her! 

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Personally I am staying at home as much as possible. The occasional trip to the supermarket when food runs out is as much going out as I plan to do. As a father of two children, however, who are no longer at school given as all schools are shut, what I have been taking pictures of is our attempts to educate our children at home. And also some of the other activities that we have been doing around our home and garden.

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