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Betty LaRue

Post a beautiful nature picture

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On 21/09/2020 at 10:43, Allan Bell said:

 

Not exactly nature but nice all the same.

 
derelict-windmill-in-field-near-chilton-street-clare-suffolk-2016-H64849.jpg
 
 
 
 
 
 
picture-postcard-english-village-view-across-the-green-finchingfield-H6484W.jpg
 
 
Allan
 

I like them very much.

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On 28/08/2020 at 19:06, Shergar said:

rufous-hummingbird-selasphorus-rufus-fro

Very nice. We only have ruby-throats. I this an Anna?

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On 18/09/2020 at 04:57, gvallee said:

Blue-faced honeyeater (Entomyzon cyanotis) feeding on grevillea.

 

2CN4YEN.jpg

Your birds make me so envious!

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Jinotega from the ridge on the other side of town.   North end of town showing under the mountains.  Jinotega is at 1,000 meters/3200 ft.  Ridge in the clouds is around 6,000 ft.

 

RREDXJ.jpg

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8 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

I like them very much.

 

Thank you Betty.

 

Allan

 

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11 hours ago, MizBrown said:

Jinotega from the ridge on the other side of town.   North end of town showing under the mountains.  Jinotega is at 1,000 meters/3200 ft.  Ridge in the clouds is around 6,000 ft.

 

RREDXJ.jpg

Beautiful country. I love mountains, but no longer can go up in them. Actually never should have. But I was a sponsor for my daughter’s Girl Scout troop twice on ski trips. I learned to ski there, and went on another 6 or so family ski trips.  My irregular heart beat was made much worse by the thin air and I always had altitude sickness.  I loved skiing so much that I soldiered through.  I finally, after some pretty severe chest pain, realized I could no longer do that if I wanted to survive.
There are two things I adore. Mountains and beaches/sea. I do well snorkeling or beach combing!

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10 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

Beautiful country. I love mountains, but no longer can go up in them. Actually never should have. But I was a sponsor for my daughter’s Girl Scout troop twice on ski trips. I learned to ski there, and went on another 6 or so family ski trips.  My irregular heart beat was made much worse by the thin air and I always had altitude sickness.  I loved skiing so much that I soldiered through.  I finally, after some pretty severe chest pain, realized I could no longer do that if I wanted to survive.
There are two things I adore. Mountains and beaches/sea. I do well snorkeling or beach combing!

 

Thanks.  I don't walk up mountains anymore either.   Loved cross country skiing, never did alpine/downhill on the fatter skis.   Nicaragua has the Corn Islands which have diving on the last tail end of the Belize reef, I believe.  Haven't been there, yet. 

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On 24/09/2020 at 09:43, Betty LaRue said:

Your birds make me so envious!

 

This guy is pretty but a big bully!! Juveniles have a green face instead of blue.

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B6NHY4.jpg

 

Our blue jays are bullies, too. We can’t escape bullies. Once I heard the loudest bird screams. Rushed through my patio door and one bluejay was on top of another, had it pinned on its back. They are loud birds at any time, but this was beyond the pale. I ran out clapping my hands and they broke it up, flew away. The violence scared me. I never thought birds could be so vicious except for birds of prey.

Edited by Betty LaRue
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Juvenile Moorhen standing on branch flapping its wings after cleaning or preening. Water rail, gallinula chloropus, rallidae Stock Photo

 

 

Juvenile Moorhen having a good flap about here. Felt very lucky to have captured this and in nice light too. They're so shy that several previous attempts failed.

 

Edited by Cal
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On 25/09/2020 at 03:21, Betty LaRue said:

B6NHY4.jpg

 

Our blue jays are bullies, too. We can’t escape bullies. Once I heard the loudest bird screams. Rushed through my patio door and one bluejay was on top of another, had it pinned on its back. They are loud birds at any time, but this was beyond the pale. I ran out clapping my hands and they broke it up, flew away. The violence scared me. I never thought birds could be so vicious except for birds of prey.

These are fabulous images Betty. 

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1 hour ago, R De Marigny said:

These are fabulous images Betty. 

Thank you!

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On 23/09/2020 at 17:11, Betty LaRue said:

Very nice. We only have ruby-throats. I this an Anna?

This guys a Rufous Betty.

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On 23/09/2020 at 13:28, MizBrown said:


 I think that the key for any bugs, spiders, or plants is complete scientific name(s) and as many common names as you find on Wikipedia.   Also, making sure you have photos that allow people to use them for identifying other examples of the plant or bug.

 

 

I know that providing scientific names in an image's Desc & keywords for critters and plants is highly recommended.  

 

I'm OK figuring out what kinda critter/bird I've snapped - but for other than the most common bugs and trees/flowers/plants I'm pretty clueless. 

 

Are there some good on-line methods/resources of ID'ing North American bugs & trees/plants/flowers suggested?      

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2 hours ago, Phil said:

 

I know that providing scientific names in an image's Desc & keywords for critters and plants is highly recommended.  

 

I'm OK figuring out what kinda critter/bird I've snapped - but for other than the most common bugs and trees/flowers/plants I'm pretty clueless. 

 

Are there some good on-line methods/resources of ID'ing North American bugs & trees/plants/flowers suggested?      

 

Seek from iNature, Google Lens, and PlantSnap are useful.  We've had a discussion of them on another thread.  You can get at least the genus for most things and check with Google Images and Wikipedia and see if the app ID matches what you can find on line.

 

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5 hours ago, MizBrown said:

 

Seek from iNature, Google Lens, and PlantSnap are useful.  We've had a discussion of them on another thread.  You can get at least the genus for most things and check with Google Images and Wikipedia and see if the app ID matches what you can find on line.

 

 

Thanks for the suggestions

 

I installed the Seek and PlantSnap apps and gave them a quick test run outside the house.  The technology is pretty amazing.  Should help a lot ID'ing flowers/plants etc. and not get bogged down so much when trying to figure out what vegetation I've photographed.

 

 

 

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Magpie Goose taking off in a wetland

 

2CW6PR7.jpg

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16 hours ago, gvallee said:

Magpie Goose taking off in a wetland

 

2CW6PR7.jpg

Okay, so I don’t envy you your birds. That's one ugly bird. 🤣

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4 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

Okay, so I don’t envy you your birds. That's one ugly bird. 🤣

 

LOL!! Aborigenes' stapple diet during migration season.

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Yarrow, achillea millifolium, in the lawn. Some rather unkindly call it a weed. Not I.

Spotted during a party in our new Superdome tent in the garden. Hope to catch the one currently in bud later and do a studio job on it.

DSC05850.jpg

Edited by spacecadet

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7 hours ago, gvallee said:

 

LOL!! Aborigenes' stapple diet during migration season.

I like that you “get” my sense of humor. 😊

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51 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

Yarrow, achillea millifolium, in the lawn. Some rather unkindly call it a weed. Not I.

Spotted during a party in our new Superdome tent in the garden. Hope to catch the one currently in bud later and do a studio job on it.

DSC05850.jpg

This is a weed also. Henbit. If the lawn isn’t treated for weeds, it can take over a lawn. It looks pretty when it’s in bloom, making a carpet of purple,  but chokes out the grass and allows other weeds to take over.

AYTTPK.jpg

Edited by Betty LaRue

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2CWD500.jpg

 

I copied someone else's link, replaced with my image ID. There must be an easier way to make a share link for the forum? This larger size.

 

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On 29/09/2020 at 16:04, spacecadet said:

Yarrow, achillea millifolium, in the lawn. Some rather unkindly call it a weed. Not I.

Spotted during a party in our new Superdome tent in the garden. Hope to catch the one currently in bud later and do a studio job on it.

 

One like this?

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71W4xxleixL._AC_SL1500_.jpg

 

Bio Green SD300 Superdome Growtunnel, Garden Cl Length 9.8 x Width 2.3 ft, 2.6 x 2.3X 9.8', Transparent/Green.

😂

 

wim

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Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, wiskerke said:

 

One like this?

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71W4xxleixL._AC_SL1500_.jpg

 

Bio Green SD300 Superdome Growtunnel, Garden Cl Length 9.8 x Width 2.3 ft, 2.6 x 2.3X 9.8', Transparent/Green.

😂

 

wim

😀Ah no, the party was in the tent, not the flower.

One of these

G1155.jpg

Incidentally, none on Alamy , should have taken a pic. But it's ahrdly likely to be up before March now🙁

Edited by spacecadet

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