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On 21/04/2020 at 02:46, Marianne said:

 

Thanks for the info on the butterfly ...

and best of luck with your garden!  Let's hope we both have many opportunities to take photos of our new gardens filled with beautiful plants, butterflies and birds as the weather gets warmer! 

Thank you Marianne. I was ill for over a week before , so glad I have  now managed to Potter about. Next on the list pond vegetation & tie in supports for the runner beans they already have bamboo. I just need to remember where I put the Twine. They seem to have shot up quite fast in their pots, hoping to place outside mid May /early June once I'm sure no morning frosts. 

🤔

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Not as beautiful or breath taking as many of the photographs in this thread.

But a very short nature walk near my place, that goes in the mangrove.

You can only do it at low tide, or on small tide.

On big high tide, the water comes over the walkway.

 

the-mangrove-forest-board-walk-at-east-p

 

But when I don't have much time, I really enjoy going there for a few minutes.

 

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1 hour ago, Regis said:

Not as beautiful or breath taking as many of the photographs in this thread.

But a very short nature walk near my place, that goes in the mangrove.

You can only do it at low tide, or on small tide.

On big high tide, the water comes over the walkway.

 

the-mangrove-forest-board-walk-at-east-p

 

But when I don't have much time, I really enjoy going there for a few minutes.

 

Thanks for sharing this Regis. I think it's so good to have nature places to go to, especially ones close by that we can visit even when we don't have much time. There's something healing about being around plants and in the outdoors. I have briefly seen mangroves at Bunbury here in Western Australia and at Port Augusta in South Australia, both of these being very southerly locations for mangroves. But one day I will get to the north and see them up there where they are much more plentiful.

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I had been watching a Swans nest on a local pond waiting for the eggs to hatch(they still haven't) when this little chap came swimming by. Miles away from the female who was looking for him, obviously an independent streak.🙂

 

 

mallard-duck-duckling-swimming-through-lilly-pads-2BKJCE0.jpg

 

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2 hours ago, aphperspective said:

I had been watching a Swans nest on a local pond waiting for the eggs to hatch(they still haven't) when this little chap came swimming by. Miles away from the female who was looking for him, obviously an independent streak.🙂

 

 

mallard-duck-duckling-swimming-through-lilly-pads-2BKJCE0.jpg

 

 

Ugly duckling.

 

Allan

 

Cute really though.😊

 

ITMA

 

Edited by Allan Bell
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2 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Ugly duckling.

 

Allan

 

Cute really though.😊

 

ITMA

 

They do have an instant cuteness effect. Unfortunately for him if he carries on behaving like that he will be lunch for every passing fox, rat, owl, hawk, weasel, stoat or pike unless his mum gives him a good speaking to.🤕 

Andy

Edited by aphperspective
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4 hours ago, aphperspective said:

I had been watching a Swans nest on a local pond waiting for the eggs to hatch(they still haven't) when this little chap came swimming by. Miles away from the female who was looking for him, obviously an independent streak.🙂

 

 

mallard-duck-duckling-swimming-through-lilly-pads-2BKJCE0.jpg

 

I like it.
My mare, Torchy, that I owned years ago, foaled an independent strawberry roan filly. Most foals stick by mama’s side. Brandy, my filly, from the outset would leave the mare and go into the horse barn alone. She would have mock fights with an imaginary aggressor, which I think was our other mare who would bite or kick her when given the chance.

Brandy kicked the tin of the barn in one spot enough to bow it out, and I watched her swing her head and bite at the air. Yet she was sweet and gentle with people.

Brandy’s mom had enough one day, and took care of the other mare after she kicked her foal. She maneuvered Cricket into the corner of their pasture and gave her a proper kick-beating. Cricket had hair skinned off her hindquarters. Of course, I was hysterical, but hubby said leave ‘em alone, Cricket had it coming.

Betty

ps...I had fun naming all of our horses.

Sunny...palomino gelding

Dolly...Welch pony pinto mare

Sin...dappled grey stallion

Torchy (commonly called Torch)...blood sorrel mare

Cricket...black mare

Brandy...my strawberry roan filly

Chance...Cricket’s- colt

Edited by Betty LaRue
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Tough love works sometimes. I used to fish at a local lake for several years, every year a pair of ducks had 9-13 ducklings and by the end of summer they were always down to 1 or 2. The mortality of a ducklings is huge.

Andy 

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On 05/05/2020 at 09:06, R De Marigny said:

Thank you Marianne. I was ill for over a week before , so glad I have  now managed to Potter about. Next on the list pond vegetation & tie in supports for the runner beans they already have bamboo. I just need to remember where I put the Twine. They seem to have shot up quite fast in their pots, hoping to place outside mid May /early June once I'm sure no morning frosts. 

🤔

 

Glad you're feeling better.

 

This morning I ordered some lyme (to help break down the wood and leaf mulch), deer-repelling fertilizer, and potting soil that hubby picked up en route to the grocery store today, and have some young plum tomato plants on order being held in the local nursery's greenhouse until all chance of frost is gone here (snow is quite possible Friday!).

 

I got round one of my Heirloom grape tomato seeds and salvia planted, keeping moist on top of a radiator cover near a south-facing window until they sprout and then go into small pots until they are ready for their third transplant outdoors.  My Bee Balm seeds are in the fridge (I read they should be kept there for anywhere from 2 weeks to 3 months - in two weeks I'll want to get them going so they germinate early enough to get them sown, so 2 weeks it is! I had a couple of spirea bushes along two walls of our south-facing barbecue area that died over the winter, so my husband is going to dig them out. The dead plants are right in the center of the two intersecting rows, so it's the perfect place to plant my butterfly garden with the well-established remaining spirea plants on either end. I plan to plant mostly perennials there with a few annuals for interest, and more in pots along some low stone walls. 

 

My non fruit-bearing apple and pear trees are beginning to bloom, and the lilacs are nearly in full bloom now, hoping they will be ready to cut tomorrow to avoid damage from the potential snow on Friday. I love the smell of lilacs and though one tree lost a very large limb due to a wind storm, they were my Mother's Day gift the year we bought the house 22 years ago and one tree still reaches our second floor office window, even after pruning it back last year. 

 

I'm so excited to be gardening again. When we bought our house a friend bought me a beautiful book on flower gardens (that has also helped me identify wildflowers I find in my travels), and I'm enjoying  re-reading it. I was an avid gardener for years, pottering in the yard at 6 am before getting my daughter ready for daycare then grammar school and myself off to my law firm (a lifetime ago it seems) until a series of accidents and two surgeries conspired with my RA to tamper my enthusiasm, so for over a decade now I've rarely done more than grow potted herbs, and zinnias, sunflowers, or other easy annuals. New meds for the RA has improved my outlook and I'm ready to get back to digging in the earth, and am really excited to grow some veggies along with herbs, and to get some new perennials established. And the photo opportunities....

 

More fodder for this thread come June!

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Horses, though one bit me and another stepped on and broke my pinky toe, the first year I took riding lessons (English saddle) at the tender age of 11, I still love them. Never bitten by a dog and had a German Shepherd and a Shepherd-Collie mix growing up, but I'm still wary of them. 

 

Betty, all those horses! I'm terribly jealous. Only the two rich girls in my class had their own. The rest of us rode whichever horse they assigned us each week. Some of them were less than sweet-tempered as you might imagine from their aggressive behavior. 

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A beautiful Rainbow Lorikeet. These birds are quite common in Australia. Sadly, I just read that they are now hit by a mystery virus and are dropping dead from the sky.

 

CWKRP6.jpg

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2 hours ago, gvallee said:

A beautiful Rainbow Lorikeet. These birds are quite common in Australia. Sadly, I just read that they are now hit by a mystery virus and are dropping dead from the sky.

 

CWKRP6.jpg

 

Australia has some of the most amazing wildlife - beautiful image - but how sad!  Hope they develop herd immunity to whatever it is soon and it runs its course. So beautiful juxtaposed against those flowers. What are they? i.e. what kind of tree?

Edited by Marianne
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1 hour ago, Marianne said:

 

Australia has some of the most amazing wildlife - beautiful image - but how sad!  Hope they develop herd immunity to whatever it is soon and it runs its course. So beautiful juxtaposed against those flowers. What are they? i.e. what kind of tree?

 

I'm not sure, it was taken in a botanical garden. I think it might have been this flower. Red Hot Poker plant?

 

CWKPJW.jpg

Edited by gvallee
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22 hours ago, Sally R said:

 

Thanks for sharing this Regis. I think it's so good to have nature places to go to, especially ones close by that we can visit even when we don't have much time. There's something healing about being around plants and in the outdoors. I have briefly seen mangroves at Bunbury here in Western Australia and at Port Augusta in South Australia, both of these being very southerly locations for mangroves. But one day I will get to the north and see them up there where they are much more plentiful.

 

Thank you Sally,

 

Yes mangroves are great, if you don't mind mozzies and midgies.

And yes, 15 to 20 minutes in nature among trees or on the beach, really washes the day away.

 

Have a good day,

Regis

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Teddy bears reading wildlife magazine on bed

teddy-bears-reading-wildlife-magazine-on-bed-JC0CJ6.jpg
 
 
Looked in my port for "Wildlife" and this is what I found.
 
The bears were a bit wild when they new I had taken a photo of them in their Jimjams.
 
Allan
 
Edited by Allan Bell
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On 06/05/2020 at 13:02, aphperspective said:

I'm afraid me and horses don't get on. Never forgave the entire species since one took a chunk out of my fishing umbrella.

Andy 

:lol: hope it tasted good.

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2 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

Teddy bears reading wildlife magazine on bed

teddy-bears-reading-wildlife-magazine-on-bed-JC0CJ6.jpg
 
 
Looked in my port for "Wildlife" and this is what I found.
 
The bears were a bit wild when they new I had taken a photo of them in their Jimjams.
 
Allan
 

Love the look of the vintage bedroom. I grew up with cotton chenille bedspreads. The curtain and wallpaper prints are perfect. I like them  and the bears. Hope they didn’t claw you in anger.

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18 hours ago, gvallee said:

A beautiful Rainbow Lorikeet. These birds are quite common in Australia. Sadly, I just read that they are now hit by a mystery virus and are dropping dead from the sky.

 

CWKRP6.jpg

Arghhh! We has some kind of bird flu over here years ago that killed several varieties of birds. I think it finally died out on its own. Seems like some of the blackbirds were vulnerable best I can remember long after the happening.

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This image is of Quarry Lake, above City of Canmore AB Canada;  I go here several times / week for my early evening walks:

walking-path-and-quarry-lake-landscape-w

 

Image never sold on Alamy, but netted me over $100 elsewhere, including rare micro extended license just yesterday.   I just love it here, and how this walking path on right side leads into distant mountain peaks in the horizon.  Wildlife can also be seen, and few summers back we even had grizzly bears by the lake! 

 

If you are ever here, do come in the evening -- there will be no people, and sky can get very dramatic in right conditions.

Edited by Autumn Sky
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Cotton Harlequin Bug (Tectocoris diophtalmus), guarding its pink eggs, Queensland, Australia

 

JP2WKA.jpg

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