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34 minutes ago, Harry Harrison said:

Still, the girl got her cards back

 

If I found another wallet in the street today, I'd use Google and social media to reunite wallet and owner. To be fair to the police, they would probably have to do the same... or leave lost items languishing in some cupboard, waiting for someone to come and claim them.

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On 04/07/2020 at 10:25, Colblimp said:

I just ate a load of eggy bread - yum

 

My mother used to make that dish for me when I was living at home.

 

Ahh, memories.

 

Allan

 

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4 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

My mother used to make that dish for me when I was living at home.

 

Ahh, memories.

 

Allan

 

Eggs, milk, cinnamon, white bread - lovely.

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1 hour ago, Colblimp said:

Eggs, milk, cinnamon, white bread - lovely.

My stepfather used to eat it, but without cinnamon. He salted and peppered it. I haven’t eaten any since a child. One way to make the eggs go farther and feed more people.

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13 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

My stepfather used to eat it, but without cinnamon. He salted and peppered it. I haven’t eaten any since a child. One way to make the eggs go farther and feed more people.

Very tasty and extremely filling! 

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Colblimp said:

Very tasty and extremely filling! 

Yes it is. I remember liking it. Not so different from the way we made French toast, which we dipped the whole slice of bread in beaten egg, and yes, using cinnamon, and skillet-fried it in a bit of butter. Then we put syrup on in the plate.

Edited by Betty LaRue
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5 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

Yes it is. I remember liking it. Not do different from the way we made French toast, which we dipped the whole slice of bread in beaten egg, and yes, using cinnamon, and skillet-fried it in a bit of butter. Then we put syrup on in the plate.

I also fry it, but in basic cooking oil.  No syrup here, I just eat it how it comes.

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Posted (edited)
22 hours ago, Thyrsis said:

 

Aha! We are planning to meet up there next weekend with my daughter as she hasn’t been before. Is the lavender flowering now?

And Snowshill Manor is one of my favourite National Trust properties!

 

Yes, all is flowering and the bulk of the lavender is looking very nice. It was very windy when I visited, but I got the family shots I wanted. We arrived just after 11am and the carpark was filling up fast, but it never completely filled up.

Edited by sb photos
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16 hours ago, sb photos said:

 

Yes, all is flowering and the bulk of the lavender is looking very nice. It was very windy when I visited, but I got the family shots I wanted. We arrived just after 11am and the carpark was filling up fast, but it never completely filled up.

 

Snowshill is a lovely village in the heart of a lovely area. When I visited with my lady friend we were doing the Cotswolds back in October 2014. I didn't realise it was that long ago. Took a few images of which one or two have been licensed. Should have/could have taken lots more.

 

Allan

 

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3 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Snowshill is a lovely village in the heart of a lovely area. When I visited with my lady friend we were doing the Cotswolds back in October 2014. I didn't realise it was that long ago. Took a few images of which one or two have been licensed. Should have/could have taken lots more.

 

Allan

 

 

I love the gardens  at Snowshill Manor but as it's a NT property not much point taking pictures!

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On 26/06/2020 at 16:28, NYCat said:

I got a HAIRCUT... WHOOPIE... NYC is definitely coming to life as we are in the second stage of re-opening. More people on the streets and my neighborhood salon is open. The chairs have always been a decent distance apart and I was happy to see that we didn't have plexiglass partitions. We were all in masks which is weird but I got a great cut as usual. It's not a fancy place... The owner and almost all the staff are Chinese. Most clients have been going there for years and happy to see everyone. The owner and the woman who cuts my hair are both left-handed. I wonder if they need special scissors. Betty can tell us. She's another of those lefty geniuses.

 

Paulette

 

I also got haircut today—but I was both the barber and the client. I used the new beard trimmer I got yesterday and took my hair down to Bruce Willis length. There will be NO PICTURES!!!

 

I'll be going back to my Kurdish barber in . . . late September? Rût is their word for bald.

 

How do I look? Thank God for baseball caps and brandy!

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28 minutes ago, Thyrsis said:

 

I love the gardens  at Snowshill Manor but as it's a NT property not much point taking pictures!

 

Same with Cotswold Lavender, no commercial photography or drones. The hedge around the lavender fields is much higher than when I last visited. You can shoot commercially for £40, or £60 if you are shooting portraits, engagement or wedding shoots. All I shot was personal family photos among the lavender. You used to be able to photograph inside the amazing Snowshill Manor House on a day when they were closed for cleaning for a small fee, but not for commercial use. I never took up the option.

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Notification from Paypal that money has come in from Alamy for images sold.

 

Allan

 

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one the subject of eggy bread, one of my favourites is : make a cheese sandwich, dip it in a beaten egg, (I like to cut the sandwich into quarters first) covering both sides then cook in a pan in a little butter until both sides are golden brown. yum  I like mine with ketchup on it.

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Posted (edited)
33 minutes ago, george said:

one the subject of eggy bread, one of my favourites is : make a cheese sandwich, dip it in a beaten egg, (I like to cut the sandwich into quarters first) covering both sides then cook in a pan in a little butter until both sides are golden brown. yum  I like mine with ketchup on it.

All very well, and I loved eggy too, but the Portuguese have trumped it with the francesinha. Chorizo, cheese inside and out, sauce, chips.

They have entire restaurants devoted to these blighters. Heart attack on a plate.

No egg though.

Now there's a thought...........

HCFYP7.jpg

Edited by spacecadet
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Discussed before but a better use for egg is in a Spanish Tortilla, a potato and onion omelette. Scrumptious, as is most stuff made with onions. We've even encountered it served with bread, an unecessary embellishment in my view.

 

Tortilla and bread sandwich,  Bocadillos de tortilla - Stock Image

 
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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, spacecadet said:

All very well, and I loved eggy too, but the Portuguese have trumped it with the francesinha. Chorizo, cheese inside and out, sauce, chips.

They have entire restaurants devoted to these blighters. Heart attack on a plate.

No egg though.

Now there's a thought...........

HCFYP7.jpg

yes have had one in Porto, asked for the sauce on the side though as hate soggy chips. mine came with an egg, it should also have beef and ham as well as the chorizo. I struggled to eat even half, as you say, a heart attack on a plate! 

Edited by george
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As Betty said, the U.S. version is called French toast (not even sure it is even a French dish at all).  And restaurants have all kinds of variations with types of breads to stuffing them with fruit. The middle shot, the French toast is stuffed with strips of caramelized apple.  When I make it,  I just keep it simple. 

 

Food, meals breakfast French toast with strawberrie and syrup being poured over it Stock PhotoUSA Virginia VA Williamsburg food breakfast at Aromas Cafe sliced apples stuffed French toast Stock PhotoUSA Sperryville Thronton River Grille French Toast served at Sunday Brunch Stock Photo

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My folks lived in a cowboy-friendly town and the place called Annie Oakley's had french toast with peanut butter between slices. Yummy.

 

Paulette

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I will not enter into a debate about what is French (I actually haven't seen in France anything mentioned 'French' in this thread) but it reminds me of something. We hardly argue about anything with my OH. We're soulmates. But shortly after we met, we had a massive argument about... of all things.... Somerset Brie. I was outraged that Brie, a French region, could be used in conjunction with a UK County. The argument turned to food copyright. We still laugh about it these days.

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19 minutes ago, gvallee said:

I will not enter into a debate about what is French (I actually haven't seen in France anything mentioned 'French' in this thread) but it reminds me of something. We hardly argue about anything with my OH. We're soulmates. But shortly after we met, we had a massive argument about... of all things.... Somerset Brie. I was outraged that Brie, a French region, could be used in conjunction with a UK County. The argument turned to food copyright. We still laugh about it these days.

 

I hear you Gen.  We have, here in the U.S., all kinds of dishes that we assign ethnic and national names to.  With a land of so many immigrants, it becomes difficult to know the precise origins of some recipes.  This is what Wikipedia says about the history of what we call French toast.

 

The earliest known reference to French toast is in the Apicius, a collection of Latin recipes dating to the 4th or 5th century, where it is described as simply aliter dulcia ("another sweet dish").[9] The recipe says to "Break [slice] fine white bread, crust removed, into rather large pieces which soak in milk [and beaten eggs] fry in oil, cover with honey and serve.""[10]

A fourteenth-century German recipe uses the name Arme Ritter ("poor knights"),[11][12] a name also used in English[4] and the Nordic languages. Also in the fourteenth century, Taillevent presented a recipe for "tostées dorées".[13] Italian 15th-century culinary expert Martino da Como offers a recipe.[14]

The usual French name is pain perdu (French: [pɛ̃ pɛʁdy] (About this soundlisten), "lost bread", reflecting its use of stale or otherwise "lost" bread — which gave birth to the metaphoric term pain perdu for sunk costs.[15] It may also be called pain doré, "golden bread", in Canada.[16] There are fifteenth-century English recipes for pain perdu.[11][17][18]

An Austrian and Bavarian term is pafese or pofese, from zuppa pavese, referring to Pavia, Italy.[19] The word "soup" in the dish's name refers to bread soaked in a liquid, a sop. In Hungary, it is commonly called bundáskenyér (lit. "furry bread").[20]

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21 minutes ago, Michael Ventura said:

 

I hear you Gen.  We have, here in the U.S., all kinds of dishes that we assign ethnic and national names to.  With a land of so many immigrants, it becomes difficult to know the precise origins of some recipes.  This is what Wikipedia says about the history of what we call French toast.

 

The earliest known reference to French toast is in the Apicius, a collection of Latin recipes dating to the 4th or 5th century, where it is described as simply aliter dulcia ("another sweet dish").[9] The recipe says to "Break [slice] fine white bread, crust removed, into rather large pieces which soak in milk [and beaten eggs] fry in oil, cover with honey and serve.""[10]

A fourteenth-century German recipe uses the name Arme Ritter ("poor knights"),[11][12] a name also used in English[4] and the Nordic languages. Also in the fourteenth century, Taillevent presented a recipe for "tostées dorées".[13] Italian 15th-century culinary expert Martino da Como offers a recipe.[14]

The usual French name is pain perdu (French: [pɛ̃ pɛʁdy] (About this soundlisten), "lost bread", reflecting its use of stale or otherwise "lost" bread — which gave birth to the metaphoric term pain perdu for sunk costs.[15] It may also be called pain doré, "golden bread", in Canada.[16] There are fifteenth-century English recipes for pain perdu.[11][17][18]

An Austrian and Bavarian term is pafese or pofese, from zuppa pavese, referring to Pavia, Italy.[19] The word "soup" in the dish's name refers to bread soaked in a liquid, a sop. In Hungary, it is commonly called bundáskenyér (lit. "furry bread").[20]

 

Ah I recognise 'Pain Perdu' or 'Lost Bread'. In any case, you might well all be right, what do I know? I left so long ago, 35 years ago to be precise, that I'm sure there will be new things as well. Whatever dishes are called, we all enjoy food. I love cooking and looking at what I serve every day, no-one would guess we're camping!!

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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, gvallee said:

I will not enter into a debate about what is French (I actually haven't seen in France anything mentioned 'French' in this thread) but it reminds me of something. We hardly argue about anything with my OH. We're soulmates. But shortly after we met, we had a massive argument about... of all things.... Somerset Brie. I was outraged that Brie, a French region, could be used in conjunction with a UK County. The argument turned to food copyright. We still laugh about it these days.

 

I'm sure you know that lot of products have protected geographical status in the EU- a product has to be made in its traditional region. So you won't see Polish parmesan or German gorgonzola. But some products were too widely made before the system came into existence. So, unfortunately, Brie like Cheddar, missed the PGI boat.

A few dozen British producers have PGIs. But we're leaving the EU. ahem, so much for that then. The international treaty protecting the Champagne name is much older.

 

Edited by spacecadet
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10 hours ago, Michael Ventura said:

The earliest known reference to French toast

 

“I went to a restaurant that serves 'breakfast at any time'. So I ordered French Toast during the Renaissance” (Stephen Wright)…

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3 minutes ago, John Morrison said:

 

“I went to a restaurant that serves 'breakfast at any time'. So I ordered French Toast during the Renaissance” (Stephen Wright)…

 

Love that John. I wasn't around at Renaissance, so I'm sure that Mr. Wright is right.

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