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Betty LaRue

Post a good thing that happened in your life today

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I have a bit of good news and bad news. Nature is so tough! I was worried about our robins nest last night because we had a very fierce storm with buckets of water pouring down and I didn't think the nest was sheltered enough under the fire escapes. This morning the nest is empty and I did see a wee dead body on the cement a distance away. I also saw a live fledgling and saw it fed once. It's looking good and I got some images. I waited a while to see if I might get shots of it being fed but finally gave up. I'll keep and eye out. I couldn't bring myself to take a picture of the dead baby. It's too sad. Those birds can have a hard time surviving.

 

Paulette

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41 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

He also showed me how to work the fire.

Lincolnshire isn't that cold......;)

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Posted (edited)

duplicate

Edited by spacecadet

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13 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

Lincolnshire isn't that cold......;)

 

Not at the moment, but a darn site cooler than Cambridge. Just preparing for winter setting in soon.😔

 

Allan

 

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I borrowed a jigsaw puzzle from my local book exchange, only 1000 pieces. I am normally very good at jigsaws, and quick. This one was possibly the toughest I have done, or maybe my mind is not in the right place. Anyway, its an alamy image by Steve Bloom, I am guessing it is fairly old judging by the box, but just completed it. Elephants running in water Chobe Botswana Stock Photo

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I bought a jigsaw a while ago and was expecting it to take a long time as it said 3 years on the box but I finished it in a day.

 

Allan

 

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1 minute ago, Allan Bell said:

 

I bought a jigsaw a while ago and was expecting it to take a long time as it said 3 years on the box but I finished it in a day.

 

Allan

 

🤣 ....

and

...🤦‍♂️🤦‍♂️🤦‍♂️

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Deleted

Edited by Steve F
Deleted

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Good things that happened in my life today?

 

Hmmmm!

 

I cleaned out part of the garage this morning and moved some boxes to make way for someone coming on Thursday to have a look with a view to giving me a quote for a new insulated roller door.

 

Removed the tatty old original outside light by the front door and fitted a new different design light with PIR. Nice.

 

Went for a saunter around another part of the village and took some photos. Don't know if they will see the light of day on Alamy yet though as I am still furloughed.

 

Allan

 

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5 minutes ago, Steve F said:

Deleted

 

WHY?

 

Allan

 

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Just now, Allan Bell said:

 

WHY?

 

Allan

 

I'm still hoping for last minute sales. 🤣 No, I thought I should better post it in how is your month. Don't worry, your post makes sense to me at least!

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Allan, I recall driving to work in Lincolnshire many moons ago, during a cold winter, and skidding on black ice. Fortunately I was able to conrtol it and no harm was done, so gan canny when out and about during the colder months.

 

Started to lift the overwintering Japanese onions, some had gone to seed (maybe due to that long hot spell in May), a few with signs of rot at the base, but a good number OK. I'll probably keep some for immediate use and cut up the rest to freeze,  rather than risk storage. Those planted this year are still growing and look to be better.

 

A couple of tomatoes have started to ripen, just turning from green to orange red. Oddly only one plant in the greenhouse (Gardener's Delight) and only one outdoors (Tumbler). No doubt folk in the deep south will have been eating theirs for weeks....

 

Intending to lift the first spuds tomorrow, interested to see what they will be like

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13 minutes ago, Bryan said:

Intending to lift the first spuds tomorrow, interested to see what they will be like

There's nothing like the first harvest, is there.

 

These from a few years back before ill health forced me to give up my own allotment.

 

fresh-allotment-grown-organic-peas-potatoes-and-cabbage-picked-for-E5CC0M.jpg

 

How do you find Tumbler toms?  We've recently had an area outside the back door covered with a perspex canopy and there's a few good sites for hanging baskets that would be sheltered and warmer than outside in the garden (no greenhouse).  I'm eying them up for next year.

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Bad news followed by good news. Our washing machine broke down. The good news, it was economically repairable, and it was temporally fixed for 40 deg C washes until the faulty part is replaced next week. 

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9 hours ago, John Richmond said:

How do you find Tumbler toms?  We've recently had an area outside the back door covered with a perspex canopy and there's a few good sites for hanging baskets that would be sheltered and warmer than outside in the garden (no greenhouse).  I'm eying them up for next year.

 

John they grow very well outdoors, even in our relatively cool climate in the NE. I grow them in big hanging baskets and also in large pots, the bigger the better, and with a bit of height to lift them off the ground to give space for the trailing tomatoes. They aren't as sweet as Gardener's Delight, Sungold etc, but they are tastier than the things you buy in the shops. Blight can be a problem, but I've always managed to get a good crop before they have succumbed. I use a mix of bought compost, leaf mould, some sharp sand and a smidgeon of blood fish and bone.

 

Using my tablet at present, but I'll include a photo tomorrow.

 

Bush tomato f1 hybrid Tumbler growing in a hanging basket, north east England, UK - Stock Image

 

Bush tomato f1 hybrid Tumbler growing in a container, north east England, UK - Stock Image
 
 

 

This year I'm also growing Gardener's Delight outdoors, in a protected spot at the allotment. So far so good, they've survived a cold spell and have plenty of fruit appearing, but they aren't quite as vigorous as Tumbler and  involve more work as you are best growing them as a cordon, while Tumbler is just left to get on with it!

 

 

 

Edited by Bryan
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Thanks for the info, Bryan.

 

Even down here in warmer Plymouth I always found outdoor toms variable. In warmer years they'd grow well, start to crop - and then the blight would hit.  In cooler years they just looked miserable.  I gave up in the end.  I'll try Tumbler next year.  Blight should be less of a problem under the shelter of the canopy (no rain to carry the spores).

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On 29/06/2020 at 09:19, NYCat said:

I have a bit of good news and bad news. Nature is so tough! I was worried about our robins nest last night because we had a very fierce storm with buckets of water pouring down and I didn't think the nest was sheltered enough under the fire escapes. This morning the nest is empty and I did see a wee dead body on the cement a distance away. I also saw a live fledgling and saw it fed once. It's looking good and I got some images. I waited a while to see if I might get shots of it being fed but finally gave up. I'll keep and eye out. I couldn't bring myself to take a picture of the dead baby. It's too sad. Those birds can have a hard time surviving.

 

Paulette

Sad, sad.  I hope the survivor is ok.
 

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My son is visiting. He put an older movie on my tv through his phone Netflix connection. I had seen it when it came out around 1989 or so. “Always” with Holly Hunter and Richard Dreyfuss. I remember loving it and that it was sad, but I forgot how sad!

I didn’t cry. I bawled. Just short of sobbing. Still one of my favorite movies and sometimes it’s good to let pent-up emotions out.

 

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10 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

Sad, sad.  I hope the survivor is ok.
 

 

Still at least one survivor and it's being fed. I had the frustrating experience of seeing it go up on my fire escape right in front of my window while I was down in the garden photographing it. I wouldn't have been able to get a good shot from the apartment without scaring it away but it would have been nice to see it so close.

 

Paulette

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On 30/06/2020 at 21:59, John Richmond said:

Thanks for the info, Bryan.

 

Even down here in warmer Plymouth I always found outdoor toms variable. In warmer years they'd grow well, start to crop - and then the blight would hit.  In cooler years they just looked miserable.  I gave up in the end.  I'll try Tumbler next year.  Blight should be less of a problem under the shelter of the canopy (no rain to carry the spores).

 

I guess we may be colder in these parts, but also dryer, so perhaps blight is even more problematic where you are? 

 

Last year I delayed lifting the spuds far too long and, as a result, we suffered a lot of blight damage. Determined not to make the same mistake again I lifted the first tubers yesterday, and was rewarded with a good crop of Charlottes. I took the risk of planting them early and that has paid off, there had been some frost damage to the tops but nothing too significant. Enjoyed a cheesy leek bake (leeks our own crop from the freezer) with the spuds for dinner.

 

We share our allotment with 2 other families, but our co workers have been self isolating so I've had to do most of the graft this year. Turned out to be a godsend as it has kept me and the Mrs busy during lockdown and provided an opportunity for socially distanced conversation with the other plot holders. Last week we held an open air spaced apart committee meeting - fortunately the weather was kind.

Edited by Bryan

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3 hours ago, Bryan said:

I guess we may be colder in these parts, but also dryer, so perhaps blight is even more problematic where you are? 

Yes. I still notice the difference every time I go back up to my home town of Cleethorpes (my sisters still live up there).  25in of rain per year compared with Plymouth's 40-50in.  Down here, so the saying goes, if you can see the hills (Dartmoor) it's going to rain, if you can't it's raining. Ideal for blight spore transmission. 

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Broad beans all picked.

Charlottes ready, Ratte, Belle de Fontenay and Sarpo still growing

Picking beetroots, small carrots, spinach, courgettes and first dwarf green beans,

Tomatoes ripening in greenhouse, red peppers too. Picked about 6 small cucumbers.

Garlic harvested, onions have all fallen over. Not as big as usual but they might as well come up. 

Growing cut and come again salad leaves in troughs so can pick fresh ones daily.

Downside.... lots of daily watering.

Upside... fresh organic veg every day!

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On 30/06/2020 at 20:27, Bryan said:

Allan, I recall driving to work in Lincolnshire many moons ago, during a cold winter, and skidding on black ice. Fortunately I was able to conrtol it and no harm was done, so gan canny when out and about during the colder months.

 

Ta lad.

 

Allan

 

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On 30/06/2020 at 17:38, Allan Bell said:

a new insulated roller door.

Not planning to live in there, are you?:blink:

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10 hours ago, Thyrsis said:

Garlic harvested, onions have all fallen over. Not as big as usual but they might as well come up. 

 

 

We had a good crop of garlic, but many of the overwintering onions have gone to seed, possibly due to the hot dry period in May, and others are showing signs of white rot - so they all came out in the last couple of days and, aware that they won't store naturally, we've cut out the bad bits,  chopped them up and froze the lot.  Fingers crossed those planted this year will be better, most are from sets but there are some from seed (Santero - which has some disease resistance - I hope!).

Edited by Bryan

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