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I learned on my own to pick the notes of “I’ll Walk the Line” on my guitar last evening. Now to repeat it often enough for it to stick.

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On 05/10/2021 at 18:40, Betty LaRue said:

I learned on my own to pick the notes of “I’ll Walk the Line” on my guitar last evening. Now to repeat it often enough for it to stick.

I find playing by ear to be difficult, I've not got a good memory, and I feel insecure without a sheet of music in front of me, so good for you that you can achieve this.

 

But today's good thing involved my allotment garden - indeed many good things occur there. This year's season is almost at a close, the first frosts are not far away, and all of the tender plants are coming to the end of their lives. I was dragged into a shop by my wife who wanted to buy some boring thing, when I spotted some Aquadulce broad bean seeds being offered at half price. Now Aquadulce is the bean of choice for overwintering in the UK climate. It doesn't always survive the cold, but it will make it through a mild winter. Worth a punt I thought. Previous experience has taught me that germination can be patchy in cold wet soil, so I always start the beans off in the greenhouse. My allotment neighbour gave me a bag full of that most useful commodity, toilet roll tubes, and they provided an excellent biodegradable host for my beans. Great to be sowing a crop at this time of year. Once planted out I might try to protect the beans from the worst of the cold, a snug blanket of horticultural fleece to be applied when the weather does its worst. 

 

Then I tackled an old well established rhubarb bed, but that's another story....

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I had the most delightful day. In the middle of taking out a monarch butterfly into my front garden to release, one of four today,  and getting a picture of it, my next door neighbor Mike wandered over. He and his wife have been great neighbors.

He asked how the guitar playing was coming along. He’s a fabulous guitar player. He’s played in bands and done stage music for musical plays. He got his acoustic and came over to my house. He gave me advice, showed me a few things, but mostly we sat and rapped about music, artists and shared favorite songs. 3 1/2 hours of discourse and fun, with him shredding some licks. He said he’d found a kindred spirit. He has probably 10 guitars, mostly electric but two acoustic.

I played “River of Tears” by Eric Clapton I had on my iPad for him because of the guitar work. While familiar with Clapton and having favorites, he’d not heard that one. He started playing riffs with Clapton’s recording and it was wonderful. By the way, that’s my very favorite Clapton song.

The whole afternoon disappeared and when he went home at 4:30, I had a smile on my face for the rest of the day. Butterflies and guitar music. Can’t beat that much.

And tomorrow I’m having lunch and shopping with my daughter. And it will be a 3 butterfly day, I can see they are about ready.

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4 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

 

He asked how the guitar playing was coming along. He’s a fabulous guitar player. He’s played in bands and done stage music for musical plays. He got his acoustic and came over to my house. He gave me advice, showed me a few things, but mostly we sat and rapped about music, artists and shared favorite songs. 3 1/2 hours of discourse and fun, with him shredding some licks. He said he’d found a kindred spirit. He has probably 10 guitars, mostly electric but two acoustic.

 

Music helped get us through the lockdowns, I regret that our grandchildren haven't been pushed to learn an instrument - as yet.

 

In my youth most households would include a person or people who could play. My dad played the clarinet, mouth organ and latterly the guitar, while my wife's family had a piano and her uncle played the banjo. We had been playing at Washington Old Hall, but that had to stop because of Covid. However we have been allowed back since the summer, first playing in the garden, then in the hall itself. Sadly, due to the financial losses incurred during lockdown, the Hall is closing over winter and will be shutting at the end of October.  A couple of weeks ago a bloke asked if we had any CDs, an incredible complement for couple of very amateurish musicians. In truth if you confine yourself to pieces that are not too difficult and don't try to play too fast, even the most untalented can make a satisfactory sound. 😉

Edited by Bryan
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In my youth I tried violin and guitar but was rubbish with both even though I had a good singing voice. Sadly gone now due to lack of use over many years.

 

Allan

 

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I was so non musical as a kid (and still) that when I got put in the chorus for the elementary school play, I was told to just lip sync.  Couldn't even keep time with a tambourine.  Was always envious of the kids with music talents.  But I do love to listen to music of all kinds!

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I won't bore you all again with more tales of my astonishing musical virtuosity. I'll just sit here and pat myself on the back for a few minutes. Ouch! That's my bad arm!

 

🤨

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7 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

I won't bore you all again with more tales of my astonishing musical virtuosity.

 

Oh, go on Ed. We're all ears. It's not like there's anything else happening on the forum...

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57 minutes ago, Michael Ventura said:

I was so non musical as a kid (and still) that when I got put in the chorus for the elementary school play, I was told to just lip sync.  Couldn't even keep time with a tambourine.  Was always envious of the kids with music talents.  But I do love to listen to music of all kinds!

You've just reminded me that I was banned from the compulsory choir class at one school I attended.

I was told that I should spend that period in the library🤣

Phil

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32 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

I won't bore you all again with more tales of my astonishing musical virtuosity. I'll just sit here and pat myself on the back for a few minutes. Ouch! That's my bad arm!

 

🤨

Any chance to hear about Gene Smith!

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4 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

In my youth I tried violin and guitar but was rubbish with both even though I had a good singing voice. Sadly gone now due to lack of use over many years.

 

Allan

 

I thought my voice was gone, too. All it takes is to start singing, and little by little, the rust flakes off. While it is not what it used to be, it’s passable.

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5 hours ago, Bryan said:

Music helped get us through the lockdowns, I regret that our grandchildren haven't been pushed to learn an instrument - as yet.

 

In my youth most households would include a person or people who could play. My dad played the clarinet, mouth organ and latterly the guitar, while my wife's family had a piano and her uncle played the banjo. We had been playing at Washington Old Hall, but that had to stop because of Covid. However we have been allowed back since the summer, first playing in the garden, then in the hall itself. Sadly, due to the financial losses incurred during lockdown, the Hall is closing over winter and will be shutting at the end of October.  A couple of weeks ago a bloke asked if we had any CDs, an incredible complement for couple of very amateurish musicians. In truth if you confine yourself to pieces that are not too difficult and don't try to play too fast, even the most untalented can make a satisfactory sound. 😉

Music is the universal language.

Back when our kids were growing up, my sister’s family, our family and my mother would go camping at a beautiful lake in southern Oklahoma every year. Days were spent swimming, boating, water skiing and fishing. Each evening, we’d sit around the campfire and my brother-in-law would play his guitar. He, my mother, my sister and I sang.

All of a sudden applause would break out, surprising us. Then we’d realize people from surrounding campsites had quietly brought folding chairs and were sitting in the dark just out of the campfire light.

My mother was a big fan of Jimmy Rogers (Rodgers?) an old time folk/country singer from the depression era. She could sing his songs which usually had yodeling. People ate that up when she sang. Google “Mule Skinner Blues” by Jimmy Rodgers and you’ll see. Dolly put out a version, so did Merle Haggard.

I’m working on that song.  If I can learn to sing and play it, my kids will be brought to tears, because I will be channeling their beloved grandmother, gone these past 10 years.

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4 hours ago, John Morrison said:

 

Oh, go on Ed. We're all ears. It's not like there's anything else happening on the forum...

 

ear! ear!

 

Allan

 

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W. Eugene Smith? Did I not already tell of my minor path-crossings with the great man? ???

 

In the late 1950s, Smith was living in a loft building just north of Greenwich Village. A young friend of mine, a guitar player, brought me up there one night to join in the continuous jam session. Zoot Sims was there and one or two other guys I knew. I didn't know who Gene Smith was at the time, and I don't think we were playing in his loft, rather in one of his friends. I wonder if anything I played that night is on the Jazz Loft Project recordings? Don't know. My young jazz friend was also the guy who took me over the another jam session at a club in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn. That was great night. The club was jammed, and I was the only white face. I was a trumpet player back then. 

 

I became a photog in 1960. Harvey Zucker was a friend. He owned a fish and chips restaurant in the Village and had a custom black & white printing business. He was in one of Gene Smith's darkroom workshops and took me along one afternoon to deliver some stuff to Smith. I got to watch the master make two prints. 

I'm confused as to when this was.

 

Sometimes I think it was before I moved to Rome and sometimes I think it was a decade later. It must have been later, because Smith was not living at the Jazz Loft then. Later still, Harvey Zucker opened a photography bookstore in SoHo, A Photographer's Place. 

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21 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

W. Eugene Smith? Did I not already tell of my minor path-crossings with the great man? ???

 

In the late 1950s, Smith was living in a loft building just north of Greenwich Village. A young friend of mine, a guitar player, brought me up there one night to join in the continuous jam session. Zoot Sims was there and one or two other guys I knew. I didn't know who Gene Smith was at the time, and I don't think we were playing in his loft, rather in one of his friends. I wonder if anything I played that night is on the Jazz Loft Project recordings? Don't know. My young jazz friend was also the guy who took me over the another jam session at a club in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn. That was great night. The club was jammed, and I was the only white face. I was a trumpet player back then. 

 

I became a photog in 1960. Harvey Zucker was a friend. He owned a fish and chips restaurant in the Village and had a custom black & white printing business. He was in one of Gene Smith's darkroom workshops and took me along one afternoon to deliver some stuff to Smith. I got to watch the master make two prints. 

I'm confused as to when this was.

 

Sometimes I think it was before I moved to Rome and sometimes I think it was a decade later. It must have been later, because Smith was not living at the Jazz Loft then. Later still, Harvey Zucker opened a photography bookstore in SoHo, A Photographer's Place. 

 

Great story and worth repeating if you have already told it to this forum!  I can almost see a movie being made of those days of photography and jazz in NYC.  I loved that store, A Photographer's Place, I always made it a point to visit anytime I was in NYC...bought a few books there.

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My mom was very musical.  She owned and played a baby grand piano and an electronic organ.. the big kind they used to make, not these digital ones that are common today... however, no matter how hard she tried to teach me, I did not have the aptitude for it... I took after my dad I guess... I still have her organ, which I inherited after she passed away... can`t bring myself to get rid of it... they depreciate like cars, so wouldn`t be able to get much for it anyway.

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Michael, maybe if you bought books at A Photographer's Place in the late '80s, you bought them from me. I worked there on weekends after losing my income and savings in Oxfordshire to Black Monday in October 1987. I had put down a deposit on a cottage in Woodstock just before the stock market crashed. 

 

By the way, Johnny Depp just made a film called Minamata where he plays Smith.

 

 

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4 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

Michael, maybe if you bought books at A Photographer's Place in the late '80s, you bought them from me. I worked there on weekends after losing my income and savings in Oxfordshire to Black Monday in October 1987. I had put down a deposit on a cottage in Woodstock just before the stock market crashed. 

 

By the way, Johnny Depp just made a film called Minamata where he plays Smith.

 

 


I will look for that movie!  And yes, I was usually in NYC on weekends and visited a lot in the 80s….so quite likely we crossed paths there!  Many of my hometown friends settled in New York after college so I many reasons to visit.  I almost moved there too but got a good job as a photo studio manager for a DC commercial photographer (he was from New Jersey, just across from the Manhattan. Worked with him for six years before heading out on my own.

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Minamata is available on Amazon here. I watch the first 15 minutes of it last night. So far there's been no zombies. 

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36 minutes ago, MDM said:

Well the good thing for me is that I just got home from hospital after 1 week after my oxygen levels dropped significantly.  They started giving me oxygen through a mask and I was gradually been weaned down to normal room levels. I am tired but very happy as struggling to get enough oxygen into one's body is not a pleasant experience/

 

Before that I had a bad fever for 9 days. Been really well-looked after by the NHS, excellent care and great vegetarian food. I didn't want to post about the situation as I wasn't really up to anything for a long time. So despite being doubly vaccinated and having had Covid before, it is still possible to get serious Covid. I met a few people in hospital who have been doubly vaccinated and were having a hard time/

 

So I just wanted to say a truly heartfelt thanks to all those who were wishing me well on the other thread. Really appreciated guys. I did tell Allan where I was a few days ago but asked him to keep it under his hat for a few days. Thanks friend.

 

So forum friends do take care, real care.

Welcome back, Mick - great to see you!

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16 minutes ago, Colblimp said:

Welcome back, Mick - great to see you!

Cheers Andy. Much appreciated. 

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9 days with fever is some ordeal, Michael. Not being able to breath is no fun either. Your story tells us to take covid very seriously.

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