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Betty LaRue

Shooting straight.

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Posted (edited)
17 minutes ago, MDM said:

 

Actually I have to disagree with that first bit Sung. Constrain crop means the crop stays within the image area. It is the same as Constrain to image in the crop panel.

 

The second bit - yes absolutely. I always save the detailed history in the metadata when working in Photoshop. You can't go back but you can figure out what you did.

 

 

 

@MDM

 

Now I am confused.  Is 'Contrain to Image' (in Crop) and 'Constrain Crop' (in Lens Corrections) different?   

Sorry I didn't read your reply properly.  I thought 'Contrain' has something to do with the ratio.

 

Edited by SFL
Added a sentence in blue

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Betty and all: you can try out any of these things. If things go wrong, just click the reset button at the bottom of the menu and you go back to the original image.

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As far as I can see they are. I don't think I am missing anything. The aspect ratio is completely independent of constrain to image and constrain crop in Transform does the same thing as in the Crop panel. Happy to be enlighted if I am wrong. 

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Posted (edited)
11 minutes ago, SFL said:

 

@MDM

 

Now I am confused.  Is 'Contrain to Image' (in Crop) and 'Constrain Crop' (in Lens Corrections) different?   

Yes.

I'm telling Betty about the one in lens corrections. I'm not sure what "constrain to warp" (which is what it's called in LR5.7) even does.

Edited by spacecadet

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Posted (edited)
14 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

Yes.

I'm telling Betty about the one in lens corrections. I'm not sure what "constrain to warp" (which is what it's called in LR5.7) even does.

 

There are three of these check boxes and they all do the same thing as far as I can see. I have just had a further check and I am just about certain.

Contrain to Image in Crop and Constrain Crop in Transform and in Lens Correction all have the same effect of constraining the crop to the image area.

 

 I do a lot of raw merges in Lightroom (definitely not available in V5.x) and end up with images that have the white borders outside the image area which, depending on what I am doing, I will use constrain the crop to the image area. Manual Lens Correction has been to a large extent superseded in later versions by the automatic lens profile correction as Adobe provide custom profiles for most lenses now.

Edited by MDM

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7 hours ago, John Morrison said:

My pictures, out of the camera, tend to have a slight tilt, always in the same direction,

 

 

Slightly to the left, I'm guessing. 😉

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Well, I was talking about the stage of being a brand new computer user when I said I wrote down my steps. That was when a computer seemed something dropped off from outer space. Like back in the dark ages.

I use the grid to keep my horizontals straight, because like some of you have mentioned, I tended to drop one side. I no longer have that problem.

I use Auto transform on all images that has in the image something that needs it.

What I mean about “hard to correct” are the images I shoot that my camera was not on the same horizontal plane as what I was shooting. After using Auto transform, sometimes I have to do it manually with the use of three lines and probably 50% of the time, it ruins the image, and I have to go back in the history.

LR has brought in tools I like and I’m still coming to grips with their use. The tool where I can, say, bring the left (or right) side of the image forward. This is the most useful correction I’ve found for the particular problem I sometimes have. Well, more often than sometimes.

I just would enjoy doing it right in camera so I don’t have to fiddle so much with corrections.

Sung, while I’m good with horizon lines when I frame the shot, I guess I’m not good with using the grid for the vertical aspect.  Maybe it’s a brain thing, like why I often bump into the door that says “PULL”. 😊 (must be because I’m left-handed, a brain thing)

Thank you all for the advice. I’m always open to ideas.

Betty

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I may have missed it but haven't seen this answer yet.

In Lightroom's Develop module, hit the "R" key to enter the crop tool.  Then click the "Command" key on a Mac and drag a line along the horizon or a vertical line along a pole or building edge near the centre of the image.  The image will automatically straighten without any white areas.   Not sure what the Windows key for Mac-Command is but should be easy to figure out.

 

Rick Boden

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1 hour ago, rickboden said:

I may have missed it but haven't seen this answer yet.

In Lightroom's Develop module, hit the "R" key to enter the crop tool.  Then click the "Command" key on a Mac and drag a line along the horizon or a vertical line along a pole or building edge near the centre of the image.  The image will automatically straighten without any white areas.   Not sure what the Windows key for Mac-Command is but should be easy to figure out.

 

Rick Boden

 

Yes I think the topic got diverted but that is one good way of straightening a horizon. For those who don't like keyboard commands, then to do the same with a mouse, hit the crop tool and then the little ruler where it says angle and draw a line along the horizon or whatever it is you want parallel to the edge of the image.

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3 hours ago, John Mitchell said:

 

Slightly to the left, I'm guessing. 😉

 

Counter-intuitively, to the right...

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I have straightening the horizon down pat, but thanks. It’s the bringing one side forward to match the other side I’m coming to grips with.

 

It’s like, for instance, I’m shooting something like my fireplace mantle straight on, not using a tripod. So the left side of the camera is 6 feet from the mantle, but the right side of the camera is 6 feet 1/4 inch from the mantle. Because I’m not holding it flat. Somehow that small difference seems magnified when I look at the image and I have to make adjustments in LR to bring the left side forward to match the right.

 

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If you are using the Upright tool in LR, you can fix that pretty easily.  First trace two vertical lines (one on either side of the photo) and the trace one horizontal line, that should square up you photo nicely.  There should be some good YouTube tutorials for this.

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24 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

It’s like, for instance, I’m shooting something like my fireplace mantle straight on, not using a tripod. So the left side of the camera is 6 feet from the mantle, but the right side of the camera is 6 feet 1/4 inch from the mantle. Because I’m not holding it flat. Somehow that small difference seems magnified when I look at the image and I have to make adjustments in LR to bring the left side forward to match the right.

You seem to be basically adjusting for horizontal keystoning. I'm wary of Auto settings so personally I prefer to just use the Transform tool and the 'Horizontal' slider, but rather than use the slider I click in the number/value box and use the Up/down arrows to adjust by eye. You can check the Constrain Crop box if you want to but I prefer to manually crop out the white slivers top and bottom. On LR 6.14 Perpetual you do seem to have the Auto option along with Upright, Vertical, Level & Full.

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10 minutes ago, Harry Harrison said:

You seem to be basically adjusting for horizontal keystoning. I'm wary of Auto settings so personally I prefer to just use the Transform tool and the 'Horizontal' slider, but rather than use the slider I click in the number/value box and use the Up/down arrows to adjust by eye. You can check the Constrain Crop box if you want to but I prefer to manually crop out the white slivers top and bottom. On LR 6.14 Perpetual you do seem to have the Auto option along with Upright, Vertical, Level & Full.

Yes! Those latter adjustments are the ones I’m learning to use now. Huh. Horizontal keystoning.  Thanks for naming it. 😊

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Maybe it's because I have an aged copy of LR, but my version won't allow me to use the crop tool on an enlarged image. I get better results using the ruler in PS when it is possible to work with an actual pixels display. I also occasionally use the Auto format tool in LR, sometimes it does a great job, but just as often I need to resort to PS to sort it out, and my copy of PS is prehistoric!

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Haven't read all the above comments so this might be a duplication, but if I find that the image is slightly of the horizonal, I will use free rotate layer in photoshop to correct it, followed by a slight crop  to restore the edges of the frame. 

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4 hours ago, Bryan said:

I also occasionally use the Auto format tool in LR,

Thanks for mentioning it- I stopped using it after it had done some really weird stuff, but it actually works pretty well on most images. It would have saved me a lot of time on my Napier images.

Betty might try it- that's lens corrections>basic>auto tab.

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4 hours ago, spacecadet said:

Thanks for mentioning it- I stopped using it after it had done some really weird stuff, but it actually works pretty well on most images. It would have saved me a lot of time on my Napier images.

Betty might try it- that's lens corrections>basic>auto tab.

👍

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