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Globetrotting photographer Michael Runkel

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21 Questions with Globetrotting Travel Photographer Michael Runkel

 

https://www.photobohn.com/at-home-abroad-blog/runkle-interview

 

He has 2.5 million pictures! 

 

Not sure how much stock  pays for this near constant globetrotting.

 

Extract from interview

 

I have probably met more Germans on my travels than any other nationality. Is there something about the German culture that makes them want to explore the world more than others? I guess that is because we have a good social system. Most Germans have 30 days of holiday every year; we have paid parental leave for up to three years and are eligible to receive up to $2,000 per month. Our universal health care is another important factor that contributes to making extensive travel possible.

Edited by geogphotos

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Yes, definitely, even in the most remote places I have been, I will run into a German.  I think they are tough travelers, not caring so much about luxury accommodations and always being comfortable.   

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It is interesting discussion.   As someone who spent first half of his life in Europe and second in North America, I will say Europeans in general are more interested in travel.  But I'd not say it is just Germans;  I travel a lot too, and I see plenty of other euro nationalities;  Brits in particular.   It also depends where you go.  For instance spent some time in Laos in January and saw lots of French people  (Laos was a French protectorate between 1893 and 1953)

 

 

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57 minutes ago, Autumn Sky said:

It is interesting discussion.   As someone who spent first half of his life in Europe and second in North America, I will say Europeans in general are more interested in travel.  But I'd not say it is just Germans;  I travel a lot too, and I see plenty of other euro nationalities;  Brits in particular.   It also depends where you go.  For instance spent some time in Laos in January and saw lots of French people  (Laos was a French protectorate between 1893 and 1953)

 

 

 

 

You will meet lot's a French in old Colonies.  

 

I remember someone in Nicaragua telling me the Europeans came in progression.  The Dutch are the first to come to new places, the German will arrive after once it's on the map, and the French will be once the travel trail is well developed.   I also find the French seem to be in groups with a guide that speaks their language (but that might be because i understand it)

 

 

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I'm not a globe-trotter. However, I'd say that I've met more Germans than any other nationality during my travels in Latin America. However, they tend to like the more remote areas rather than resorts. I've always put their wanderlust down to hardiness, the long holidays, and a well-developed social services system.

 

Regarding French tourists in Latin America, I've noticed that they do indeed tend to travel in tour groups and keep to themselves, much like the Japanese. Perhaps I shouldn't mention this, but I often get mistaken for an American, which is understandable, and this seems to turn some Europeans off. However, in my experience, Americans are among the friendliest travellers out there, but not the most adventurous.

 

How does a globe-trotting photographer finance all that travel? Good question. Not thru stock photography, I'm sure, although having 2.5 million images probably helps matters somewhat.

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John - naturally it's hard to finance travel from stock photography, specially nowdays. But adventure travel is not as hard or expensive as some might think. It is the fear of unknown that drives some people to organized trekking companies, and then priced are ridiculously overblown (ie Intrepid, etc). But if you do your own research, are willing to sometime rough a bit etc it can be quite economical.

 

Also, if you need your package, it is without exception better to contract local companies. You get much better service, for far less money + better experience as you mingle with locals as opposed to spending time with other tourists from organized western groups, eating in expensive restaurants catering to deep pockets ad opposed to local eateries where ppl that live there eat, etc. You also help local economies, and these are often very nice people struggling with much harder life conditions than we have in the west.

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55 minutes ago, Autumn Sky said:

John - naturally it's hard to finance travel from stock photography, specially nowdays. But adventure travel is not as hard or expensive as some might think. It is the fear of unknown that drives some people to organized trekking companies, and then priced are ridiculously overblown (ie Intrepid, etc). But if you do your own research, are willing to sometime rough a bit etc it can be quite economical.

 

Also, if you need your package, it is without exception better to contract local companies. You get much better service, for far less money + better experience as you mingle with locals as opposed to spending time with other tourists from organized western groups, eating in expensive restaurants catering to deep pockets ad opposed to local eateries where ppl that live there eat, etc. You also help local economies, and these are often very nice people struggling with much harder life conditions than we have in the west.

 

Yes, I realize that. I've always been a budget traveller, preferring to stay in small hotels, frequent inexpensive restaurants, and take public transportation. It's amazing how far you can make your money go if you really work at it. I did freelance travel writing as well as photography for many years, and I used to sometimes get put up in posh places by tourism boards and taken on fancy tours, etc. As nice as all this was (certainly ain't complaining), I always looked forward to getting out on my own and going back to my frugal ways. Budget travel is the best way to meet locals and see the authentic side of places IME. Sometimes it pays not to be rich. 😉

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Don't forget that some nationalities travel because it's the only way they get to experience warm weather . . .😎

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Posted (edited)
On 25/02/2020 at 09:25, geogphotos said:

21 Questions with Globetrotting Travel Photographer Michael Runkel

 

https://www.photobohn.com/at-home-abroad-blog/runkle-interview

 

He has 2.5 million pictures! 

 

Not sure how much stock  pays for this near constant globetrotting.

 

Extract from interview

 

I have probably met more Germans on my travels than any other nationality. Is there something about the German culture that makes them want to explore the world more than others? I guess that is because we have a good social system. Most Germans have 30 days of holiday every year; we have paid parental leave for up to three years and are eligible to receive up to $2,000 per month. Our universal health care is another important factor that contributes to making extensive travel possible.

 

Hi everybody,

stock is part of the income but for sure I would not be able to receive enough income through stock agents like alamy since the sales here are very low. I have a huge variety of locations where there is hardly any footage available and I also get a lot of direct requests. But mainly I work with tour operators directly and that grants me to all that travel. In addition have books published, interviews and other income which receive indirectly through photography. Best Michael 

www.michaelrunkel.com

Edited by Michael Runkel

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