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2 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

 

Could one of you ask the sun to pop out for a minute? It never listens to me.

I've made it an offer it couldn't refuse😎

 

20 minutes ago, NYCat said:

Codeine always knocks me out completely. My drug of choice is percocet. Effective and lets me function. I hope it's OK to take at least one pill to let you get some sleep. Time does pass though sometimes not fast enough!

 

Paulette

We tend not to self- medicate much here. Certainly not with the one you mention- from what I read it's a powerful opiate painkiller. I don't think it would be prescribed for a broken arm- it sound like one of those you get long-term because it can be addictive and has withdrawal problems.

But your doctor must know what he's doing.

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Lots of people have preferences for non prescription painkillers. I've never understood how anyone would shell out for branded painkillers when the generic own-brand option which will be exactly the same thing at a fraction of the cost. This is one of those areas where  "you get what you pay for" doesn't work out. Fool & money soon parted fits better. Ibuprofen can be more effective than paracetamol for some but reduces the effect of high blood pressure treatments which many of us elder folk are on. Codeine might help you sleep but I wouldn't want to take that for a month. I can take it  without getting knocked out for a day or two and it doesn't result in constipation which can be a side effect. If I take paracetamol for more than a couple of days  I start getting low level headaches which is counter-productive. So yeh, do without if you can. Easy to say...

We're planning to take the dog for a seaside walk tomorrow as there seems to be a good chance of some sun. Being half Lab, she loves going in for a swim but it's a bit cold for that.

Edited by Robert M Estall
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I took opiates with my broken arm.  I mostly took them at night to help sleep but I hated how groggy I felt throughout the next morning, not to mention, they can make you constipated.  So I only used them when I REALLY needed it.  Not sure about in the U.K., doctors here can only prescribe around 10 at a time so you can't get too much into a mess with them.  Only a quack doctor would keep prescribing them to the same patient.  My daughter, the nurse, was always very concerned about me taking them....I kept reassuring her that I was in no danger of getting addicted.

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the diff with Rx meds in the uk is the first NHS hospital gave me the codeine/paracetamol for 3 days with no charge. I was able to buy a box of 32 at the pharmacy but paid for them. yes opiates can be addictive so are not for long-term use. and paracetamol can damage your kidneys and liver. I will try to tough it out without either. I am a bit better now than I was last night and this morning. my biggest fear is to have another fall. 

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11 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

with no charge

That sort of thing happens all the time in the NHS, Ed, You'll get used to it.;) Mind how you go.

I reckon paracetamol is OK in moderation- what would I do for hangovers otherwise?🍷but I've never taken it for more than a day or two (not for the hangovers), so what do I know.

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I’m allergic to Codeine. No rash or any of the typical things. It cause me to have nightmares with my eyes open. I guess you’d call it hallucinations. It was prescribed in a cough syrup for a sleep-robbing severe cough after the flu. So instead of coughing, I lay there with my eyes open watching bad movies.

I tend to be very careful with any pain meds. I’ve had surgeries and been prescribed 20-30 pills. I take one the night at home after the surgery. Maybe one more the next day, but that's not a given. Then acetaminophen occasionally. I absolutely hate anything that messes with my mind, and am very tuned in and against anything habit forming.

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15 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

I’m allergic to Codeine. No rash or any of the typical things. It cause me to have nightmares with my eyes open. I guess you’d call it hallucinations. It was prescribed in a cough syrup for a sleep-robbing severe cough after the flu. So instead of coughing, I lay there with my eyes open watching bad movies.

I tend to be very careful with any pain meds. I’ve had surgeries and been prescribed 20-30 pills. I take one the night at home after the surgery. Maybe one more the next day, but that's not a given. Then acetaminophen occasionally. I absolutely hate anything that messes with my mind, and am very tuned in and against anything habit forming.

 

When I had my hip replaced in 2018, the hospital gave me a prescription for Tylenol 3, which is laced with codeine. It made me feel terrible, and I had trouble sleeping. Consequently, I switched to regular extra-strength Tylenol (acetaminophen), which worked well for me. Acetaminophen is my go-to pain killer. Not sure how effective it would be for a broken arm, though.

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54 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

It's called paracetamol over here, John.

 

Thanks. I'll keep that in mind. Who dreams all these names up, I wonder.

 

I usually buy generic acetaminophen, which is cheaper than the branded varieties -- e.g. Tylenol.

 

Pain killers can be a pain themselves. 😟

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The most curious thing about the pain med combo of paracetamol and codeine is that it doesn't effect my pain at all . . . or only slightly. So if I take those pills all I'm doing is taking the risk of side effects. 

 

Sitting here unable to do my stock photography or write, I've been thinking about some things that have made me wonder. I'll put both US and UK politics aside, put covid aside too, and focus on other details. 

 

I've always wondered about these two positive things that the British have given negative names: Black Friday and a flat white. A flat white? That sounds about as appetising as a cup of warm water. And Black Friday? Yes, I know what it means, but why use a common term for darkness for a big sale day leading up to Christmas?

 

 

 

Edited by Ed Rooney
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13 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

The most curious thing about the pain med combo of paracetamol and codeine is that it doesn't effect my pain at all . . . or only slightly. So if I take those pills all I'm doing is taking the risk of side effects. 

 

Sitting here unable to do my stock photography or write, I've been thinking about some things that have made me wonder. I'll put both US and UK politics aside, put covid aside too, and focus on other details. 

 

I've always wondered about these two positive things that the British have given negative names: Black Friday and a flat white. A flat white? That sounds about as appetising as a cup of warm water. And Black Friday? Yes, I know what it means, but why use a common term for darkness for a big sale day leading up to Christmas?

 

 

 

 

Black Friday. I always thought that it originated in the US of A.

 

Flat whight white I thought was introduced by the coffee houses to indicate coffee made with hot water and a splash of milk. Wether Whether it was introduced in the UK or US of A I would not know.

 

By the way the word "Wether" I wrote above means a castrated ram.

 

Can't seem to hit the right keys this morning.

 

Allan

 

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59 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

The most curious thing about the pain med combo of paracetamol and codeine is that it doesn't effect my pain at all . . . or only slightly. So if I take those pills all I'm doing is taking the risk of side effects. 

 

 

I don't get pain relief from morphine-- which is supposed to be so powerful. Basically, I am still in pain but just don't care. Percocet has always been very effective at eliminating pain and I've usually saved a couple from the dozen or so I was given. Just in case of an emergency need. I haven't ever felt an urge to take them as some sort of intoxicant. I know they can be dangerous for some people. It's interesting how differently these thing affect us.

 

Paulette

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As I said, I understand what these terms mean.

 

But you're right, Allan. Black Friday was not begun in the UK. 🥵 https://www.telegraph.co.uk/black-friday/2020/11/27/black-friday-name-why-called-what-history-sales-2020-event/

 

While we're focused on U.S. speak, I hate the business of using empty superlatives. We know who's to blame for that. It's all over the BBC now.

 

In the land of William Shakespeare, I don't understand why better terms aren't used. 

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I apologise to the people of England, Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland for my comment on Black Friday. I can't recall every hearing it in the States. It's been some time since I've done Christmas. (I still don't like 'flat white', and I'll add 'a stuffed roll' to that.)

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Ed Rooney said:

I apologise to the people of England, Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland for my comment on Black Friday. I can't recall every hearing it in the States. It's been some time since I've done Christmas. (I still don't like 'flat white', and I'll add 'a stuffed roll' to that.)

 

 

 

 

Edo you have no need to apologise. We can't know everything but we try and if we don't ask we never will.

 

Allan

 

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1 hour ago, Ed Rooney said:

I apologise to the people of England, Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland for my comment on Black Friday. I can't recall every hearing it in the States. It's been some time since I've done Christmas. (I still don't like 'flat white', and I'll add 'a stuffed roll' to that.)

 

 

 

Ed, don't apologise, these are cultural things that not everyone can know. My Austrian German teacher still gets worked up about why we call WWI the Great War. I keep telling her it doesn't mean great as in amazing....

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2 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

I apologise to the people of England, Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland for my comment on Black Friday. I can't recall every hearing it in the States. It's been some time since I've done Christmas. (I still don't like 'flat white', and I'll add 'a stuffed roll' to that.)

 

 

 

I don't like flat white coffee either or any of the fancy other ones.  For me it's black Nescafe Gold Blend😄 probably far too much of it !

 

Carol

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Once you discover how easily these home espresso machines make superb coffee you'll chuck all those instant jars away. The ones which use pods are a waste of time and money. As to flat whites, Lattes and most of current offerings, I really don't get it. Cappuccino qualifies as coffee, most of the rest don't. Why we call watered down Espresso AMERICANO I have no idea. In Italy they give you a glass of water alongside your espresso just in case you are thirsty. I'm pleasantly surprised how so many little cafes in the UK have a decent Espresso machine and will give a proper coffee. Mostly they are proper Gaggia machines though there are a few alternatives out there.

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Carol,  I was criticising the name, not the coffee itself. Basically, it's just what Italians call caffe latte. 

 

Robert, there was a home espresso machine at some of the flats I stayed at in the past two years. I don't see myself moving around with one, not an item for a nomad. I used a French press, drink black Italian coffee with sugar, but just two large mugs in the morning. In NYC, I often had a caffe macchiato in the afternoon. 

 

Allan, I see myself as a guest in your country. I'm not here to tell people how to do things, although sometimes I have those thoughts. 

 

 

 

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7 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

Allan, I see myself as a guest in your country. I'm not here to tell people how to do things, although sometimes I have those thoughts.

That, but also better than that, a lawful resident. There are quite a few things you could tell us that we should listen to, Ed.

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Thank you, Mark. Of course I lived here (Oxfordshire) in the '80s. Not just a lawful resident with free healthcare, but my Irish passport will allow me to sidestep many of the restriction of Brexit. Right now, I spend 87% of my time feeling sorry for myself with this broken arm. 🤭

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Somewhere, this thread? We discussed shingles.  I’ve wanted to be vaccinated for a long time, but was put off figuring my copay would be too large. Years ago when I investigated it, my insurance wouldn’t cover it. The other day while online, I saw that it was covered now. The Shingrix vaccine is pricy.  A couple of days ago, I went to the pharmacy to pick up refill on a med.
On a whim, I asked if they gave the Shingrix vaccine there. Yes. I asked the young man if he could tell me what my copay would be. I had to fill out a form before he could investigate the price, so I did.  After a wait, he told me zero was my cost. Medicare and my supplemental insurance covered it all.

i got the shot, and the young lady who gave it told me it would make my arm sore. I might have mild flu symptoms, which I didn’t. Sore? About 5 hours after the shot, I felt like I needed a sling. It went past sore, which you notice if you move your arm, press or lie on it. This was pain. My arm just hanging by my side was bad, but relieved somewhat if supported by my chair armrest.

The good thing? By bedtime, the pain was gone and I was just very sore.

I'm happy to be protected. Bad news is I have to have a second shot in 2-6 months.

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