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16 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

You are right about photography being therapeutic. If I wrote my story, I would have to relive some very dark times. Yet it is those dark times that would be interesting to a reader, I suppose. What’s weird is I can remember back to when I was just walking. Granted, only one memory then, the next being when I was about 2 1/2 or 3 years old. My mind took snapshots. I remember a lot from 4-5 years old.

I really respect what your dad went through. What doesn’t kill you, makes you strong.

Thanks Betty. You could always just write some short stories about the happy memories, the things you want to share and enjoy writing about. I also have very early childhood memories that are like snapshots. I actually remember my second birthday, the two orange candles and my Mum telling me I'm 2. I even have an earlier one of me sitting in my high chair in the kitchen. My Dad was going past with his camera. I didn't really understand what it was or about photographs, but I had a sense if I did something to get his attention he would point the camera at me ( I must have seen him point the camera at things before). So I poured my bowl of yoghurt on my face. It worked! So I have a very unflattering photo of myself covered in yoghurt. I remember things that no one else in my family remembers, not by trying to, my brain just seems to encode the pictures and they stay there.

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4 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

Good morning, all!

 

https://edostrange.blogspot.com/2020/06/a-few-more-questions.html

 

Stay safe.

 

Edo

Enjoyed your blog post Edo. You are not the only one doing clumsy things. I managed to fall down some log steps on a local bushland walk recently. Fortunately only bruises and nothing worse. I think times are so strange at the moment that it easy to be a bit distracted. Keep writing your posts, take care and keep safe.

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Jenny, James, Robert, John, Mark, and Sally—thanks for your interest. 

 

Sally, whatever happened with the big typhoon that was headed for Perth? Maybe it blew all the virus germs away. 

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Lol, Edo! Some days it just doesn’t pay to get out of bed.

My dear mother didn’t swear. Well...almost didn’t. Until she dropped that egg or knocked the quart of milk over onto her freshly mopped and waxed floor. Then she said, “Weeelll, s**t!!” In a voice that expressed the uttermost disgust and frustration.

I must say occasionally I’ve carried on the tradition. Like the morning I was so engrossed sorting through the mail I’d just taken from the mailbox that I tripped over the curb and luckily fell onto the lawn instead of the concrete driveway.

Try it. It helps. You must say it with gusto and a curl to your lip.
Loved the blog.

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Betty, in Brooklyn we say, "F***ing s**t!" In the street, to preserve international harmony, I was silent.

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14 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

Sally, whatever happened with the big typhoon that was headed for Perth? Maybe it blew all the virus germs away. 

 

It really wasn't too bad. It was classified as an ex-cyclone by the time it got to us, so some strong winds and big ocean swell. Maybe it did blow our germs away. We are very lucky here that covid is well under control. We are helped by being relatively isolated. Our state premier is getting criticised by other state and federal politicians for not opening the state border yet, but I think he's doing the right thing by approaching things gradually.

 

I took some pics on the day after the stormy weather by the ocean. Would have been more impressive the day before. The coast here has been eroding more and more with a gradual sea level rise, so when storms do happen the dunes are further washed away. In the first pic below, many of the access points to the beaches along here are closed because the walkways, steps etc are no longer considered safe by the council. The second pic is the beach I learned to swim at as a kid. You can see how exposed the disability access ramp is. It hasn't been used for it's intended purpose for a long time now. The worst thing for some people in coastal towns, is their home is being threatened by the ocean and they cannot sell. They have built a sea wall at the town of Seabird north of Perth to keep the ocean at bay.

 

I imagine it is nice being by the ocean at Liverpool. I do love the ocean and have always lived within half an hour's drive from it. I could live away from it for a while but I think I'd always want to come back and be near it again.

 

a-view-from-bennion-beach-looking-towards-trigg-point-in-perth-western-australia-the-seas-were-still-rough-following-some-stormy-weather-2BY6GJB.jpg

 

 

the-disability-access-ramp-at-mettams-pool-in-trigg-being-swamped-by-waves-from-a-high-swell-following-stormy-weather-perth-western-australia-2BTYM48.jpg

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Sally, I was born in the middle of the country, just about as far from the oceans as possible. Yet the first time I saw one, the draw was strong for me. I love them. In another life....

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That's interesting Betty. My Dad was born hundreds of km from the ocean and saw it for the first time when his uncle took him there at age 5. It must be quite a thing to see when you haven't seen it before. He didn't really learn to swim properly, but could sort of float. A friend of mine had a lovely woman from the Papua New Guinea highlands staying with her who had never been out of her village before and had come to Australia. The three of us were at the beach and I remember her saying "let's run!", because it was just so exhilarating and exciting for her to be there, and we ran along the beach. It was great seeing it from her perspective.

 

I have to say I quite like deserts too. We took my Dad back to his hometown in 2013. It is quite desolate country but it has its own beauty. I reckon I could live out there a while, but would eventually want to be near the ocean again I think.

 

 

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4 hours ago, Sally R said:

That's interesting Betty. My Dad was born hundreds of km from the ocean and saw it for the first time when his uncle took him there at age 5. It must be quite a thing to see when you haven't seen it before. He didn't really learn to swim properly, but could sort of float. A friend of mine had a lovely woman from the Papua New Guinea highlands staying with her who had never been out of her village before and had come to Australia. The three of us were at the beach and I remember her saying "let's run!", because it was just so exhilarating and exciting for her to be there, and we ran along the beach. It was great seeing it from her perspective.

 

I have to say I quite like deserts too. We took my Dad back to his hometown in 2013. It is quite desolate country but it has its own beauty. I reckon I could live out there a while, but would eventually want to be near the ocean again I think.

 

 

Yes, deserts can be beautiful. My husband was stationed in the Mohave desert while in the Air Force. (California) The air was so hot & dry, but when the sun went down the temperature cooled dramatically from lack of humidity. The hills turned shades of purple and peach at sunset, it was stunning.
But my first time seeing the ocean was like coming home.

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59 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

Yes, deserts can be beautiful. My husband was stationed in the Mohave desert while in the Air Force. (California) The air was so hot & dry, but when the sun went down the temperature cooled dramatically from lack of humidity. The hills turned shades of purple and peach at sunset, it was stunning.
But my first time seeing the ocean was like coming home.

 

Betty, was that near 29 Palms?

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Posted (edited)
9 minutes ago, Thyrsis said:

 

Betty, was that near 29 Palms?

Not that far away. Victorville, which was about 20 miles (approx.?) west of San Bernardino. And that’s Mojave, not Mohave. Phonics get me every time.

Edited by Betty LaRue

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Posted (edited)
16 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

Not that far away. Victorville, which was about 20 miles (approx.?) west of San Bernardino. And that’s Mojave, not Mohave. Phonics get me every time.

 

We spent the most surreal night at 29 Palms Inn some years ago.  Looking for somewhere to spent the night on a drive from Vegas to San Diego we came across the rainbow painted gateposts and drove in. They had one room free. There was the most incredible sunset then the sky went black and we realised it was turkey vultures coming in to roost in the trees. Lots of turkey vultures! 

After an amazing dinner, with food from their organic garden in the oasis, we got chatting to a lady called Esther and a rather elderly gentleman. George had been ‘abandoned’ in a care home by his son and his dying wish was to go back to Israel. Esther was a carer there and she had ‘sprung’ him and they next day she was taking him back to his homeland. He sat there with a smile on his face and one of those neon glow sticks looped round his head! The other two guys there were based at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center at 29 Palms and had just got back from a tour somewhere so were out celebrating. 
This was about 17 years ago but it was a night to remember!

 

adobe-houses-at-twenty-nine-palms-inn-ca

Edited by Thyrsis

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Great story! My husband finished his term at that base, and was offered a job in 29 Palms. But we had been away from home 4 years for him, 3 1/2 years for me. We were ready to be back around family. We were not fans of the higher cost of living in California. We used to joke about how they taxed everything but the air we breathed.

Betty

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Posted (edited)
15 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

Great story! My husband finished his term at that base, and was offered a job in 29 Palms. But we had been away from home 4 years for him, 3 1/2 years for me. We were ready to be back around family. We were not fans of the higher cost of living in California. We used to joke about how they taxed everything but the air we breathed.

Betty

 

Deleted!

Edited by Thyrsis
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What fun! Everything goes better with wine! A bunch of fun-loving people there. I never saw 29 Palms. The closet I got was seeing a sign for it on the way home.

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Farewell and thank you to Dame Vera Lynn, who gave inspiration when it was needed most. 

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Pity to say farewell to such a positive ikon. She seemed set on going on forever and almost did.

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On 16/06/2020 at 22:37, Betty LaRue said:

What fun! Everything goes better with wine! A bunch of fun-loving people there. I never saw 29 Palms. The closet I got was seeing a sign for it on the way home.

 

You saw a sign for a CLOSET.  We tend to use TOILET.

 

Allan

 

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6 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

Farewell and thank you to Dame Vera Lynn, who gave inspiration when it was needed most. 

 

Yes indeed, and continued to inspire throughout her life. Lovely lady.

 

Allan

 

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24 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

 

You saw a sign for a CLOSET.  We tend to use TOILET.

 

Allan

 

 

A water closet is a loo is a toilet here in golly old England, Betty. We say 'John' in NYC. 

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4 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

You saw a sign for a CLOSET.  We tend to use TOILET.

 

Allan

 

You know I meant CLOSEST! sheesh, you guys! 😂

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3 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

A water closet is a loo is a toilet here in golly old England, Betty. We say 'John' in NYC. 

We say bathroom in my part of the country. Even if it’s a one-holer outhouse, you say, “Wait a second, before we hike, I need to go to the bathroom first.” And it doesn't mean you are going to take a bath.That includes port-a-potties. You never say “I have to go potty.” We are genteel in this area. 😉 
Although I think “loo” is a nice genteel name.

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There was a book, Loos of London

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14 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

A water closet is a loo is a toilet here in golly old England, Betty. We say 'John' in NYC. 

 

Known as a bog or the bogs in some quarters.

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1 hour ago, Bryan said:

 

Known as a bog or the bogs in some quarters.

 

Also Kazi. (hope that is correct spelling.)

 

Allan

 

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