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J0rt

I'd like for somebody to see my profile and suggest if anything else is good

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This forum topic is for portfolio critique.  You've only been on Alamy since August.  If you're in Mexico, there's considerable interest from travel publications and sites in that country (my first sale was of something I'd photographed in Mexico).   Get some photographs up for sale, and we'd have more to react to. 

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The portfolio is listed on the main thread.

There's some on alamy already

 

Edited by J0rt

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Just had a quick look at your pix. Some saleable subjects (though one or two look rather dark).
You may need some help with captions and tags.
Places: extend your captions to include town, region, country, etc.
You don’t need to use ‘amazing views’, ‘incredible shoots’, ‘awesome shot’, etc, as tags (nor ‘Alamy’). No need to use anything photographic as tags (no ‘hi res’, ‘lens’, ‘photograph’, etc).

Check spelling.
Be more accurate about what’s actually in the picture. So no ‘humanity’, ‘authenticity’, ‘ecological’, unless these tags really apply.
I appreciate the language difficulties… but if you don’t get the captions and tags right, your pictures won’t turn up in searches. And it's best to sort this out before 100 images turn into thousands! Good luck...

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Thank you John I appreciate the help

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Nice photos.

 

Have a look at this one: https://www.alamy.com/fe-sony-glasses-image271617668.html

 

You call it "property no". The Sony logo shows, so I suspect "yes" and maybe mark it as editorial only. Maybe, someone, more experienced, can chime in here?  

 

Title:

"FE Sony Glasses"

 

Can you tell us more about this "glasses"?  

(hint, glasses are the things we wear on our face to see better)

 

Maybe this is a lens? Maybe it has some special qualities? It's black. What's it's the focal length? It's wearing the lens cap, and the lens cap has a word on it.

 

Go to google and try to find a photo similar to this one. What words did you use?  

 

Keywords:

Is it really amazing, authenticity, awesome, bealpha, beautiful, bright, colorful, fe, incredible? Do your keywords fit your picture? If not, you might run afoul of the algorithm. 

 

Every couple of weeks, I'll visit the Alamy homepage and try searching for my photos using keywords ie "black sony 50mm lens" and see if mine shows up on the first page of the search. If not, then I know it's worth spending some time improving my keywords.  It's also worth having a glance at the keywords the top photos had for inspiration. 

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Hello, Actually it was a sort of "ideas" to add it, I'm working on the tags but I haven't had the time to fix them all. Thank you for your comment

 

Edited by J0rt

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43 minutes ago, CrowingHen said:

 

Nice photos.

 

Have a look at this one: https://www.alamy.com/fe-sony-glasses-image271617668.html

 

You call it "property no". The Sony logo shows, so I suspect "yes" and maybe mark it as editorial only. Maybe, someone, more experienced, can chime in here?  

 

 

 

Property no just means the photographer does not have a property release.  So it is correct in sofar as it goes.

 

However he should have marked it editorial if he's selling it as Royalty Free.

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Thank you, I'm learning on the process, just don't comment as I knew it all, because I don't.
Thank you for the comments.

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Hello,

 

I would echo what John Morrison has said about keywords. Get rid of generic keywords which don't specifically describe the subject of the image. They will hurt your placement in search rankings.  On the other hand, make sure you include specifics about the subject (and the location if the location is itself significant to the subject). For example, your trains will almost certainly have a designation of some kind. In the UK trains are often known by their designer or manufacturer and have a given class name, e.g. Gresley 'A4 Pacific'' class. Research and include the same kind of detail for the subjects of your images - you are more likely to sell them that way. Keywording is an important skill - I spend much more time researching and keywording my images than I do taking and post-processing them. If you are dealing with keywording in a second language, you will find it all the more difficult to do it well.

 

Make sure you designate your licence types correctly. If you include unreleased people or property in the image then the licence type needs to be RM or RF-Editorial Only.  The dancers are, I would guess, unreleased people. The trains are likely to be unreleased property.

 

Make sure  you have the appropriate credentials to sell these images commercially. Many museums in the UK do not permit photographs being taken for the purposes of re-selling unless permission is obtained first. It may or may not be the same where you are. The same may go for performances such as the location where you photographed the dancers. Make sure you know what you can and can't do in your locality.

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I keep learning Joseph have been really useful tips and answers :) I can't complain, thank you very much

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1 hour ago, David Pimborough said:

Property no just means the photographer does not have a property release.  So it is correct in sofar as it goes.

ah.  thanks!

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You have some interesting images but the keywords should only reflect what is in each image.  I was curious about an image of an empty room with two windows and a chair 2A5CWWAY.  Many of the keywords did not seem to apply to the image, e.g. green fields, green park, morning road, morning trail, train, trains, train wagons, trees, etc. Having good photographs is important, but they need to be able to be found by customers.  Irrelevant keywords will cause your alamy rank to drop, making your images less likely to be found.

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On 10/11/2019 at 00:22, MariaJ said:

You have some interesting images but the keywords should only reflect what is in each image.

So true. This is recurring occurrence with new contributors.  In most cases I don't think it is intentional, but simply inexperience.   I recall when I started I'd include "nostalgia" "lifestyle" and "heritage" to every landscape I submit.   Cool keywords I thought,  they should be there.    Now I think newcomers should use absolute minimum that accurately describe image content and later expand towards composites  or not immediately obvious ones.   In that sense Alamy discoverable criteria does not help as one is tempted to start inventing things.

 

One other thought:   One could argue keywording can be regarded as game to get into customer head.   In Alamy measures I often notice "Great Trail" or "Great Trail Canada" search term.  What is "Great Trail"???? Could apply to just about anything outdoors / hiking related.  Does customer have something specific in mind (i.e.  "Legacy Trail" Banff - Canmore, which is quite famous)   or  some editor in Europe has vague idea Canada is known for great outdoors, so they want photo of some popular hiking trail?   There are many similar examples.  At the end I think predicting what customer might or might not think is not best approach either.   Just stick to the facts that describe the asset and generally speaking simpler / generic is better.  

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On 08/11/2019 at 13:25, David Pimborough said:

 

Property no just means the photographer does not have a property release.  So it is correct in sofar as it goes.

 

However he should have marked it editorial if he's selling it as Royalty Free.

 

What is correct then?


What's the criteria?

Edited by J0rt

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On 17/11/2019 at 04:50, J0rt said:

 

What is correct then?


What's the criteria?

 

Alamy (and most other agencies) state that if a photo is Royalty Free and shows brands, logos, grafitti, recognisable people and certain buildings (where the building is the primary focus) then the photo should be marked as editorial.

 

Also certain designs i.e. Apple iPhone, Coca Cola bottles, car designs etc.

 

Unless you have a property release from the owner of the design, brand, logo etc  (and model release for identifiable people)

 

Alamy ask this in the optional tab for the image marked "Is there any property in the image?" so the Sony lens would be marked as "yes"

and as you don't have a property release from the Sony Corporation then you would select "No" where it asks "do you have a property release"

 

Then as its a Royalty Free image you need to find the "Editorial" tick box in the optional tab its called "Sell for editorial only"

 

Rights managed images on the whole can just be marked as no property release (if you don't have a property release) and you generally don't need to mark the editorial only tick box (stands to be corrected by other contributors)

 

Edited by David Pimborough
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Ohh Alright this is a different explanation :) I think i can work on those details now that I'm clear about all of them. Thank you david.

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4 hours ago, J0rt said:

Ohh Alright this is a different explanation :) I think i can work on those details now that I'm clear about all of them. Thank you david.

 

No its not different its just more detailed.

 

But you can find the Alamy guidelines here

 

https://www.alamy.com/contributor/how-to-sell-images/model-property-releases-stock-images/?section=7

 

and

 

https://www.alamy.com/blog/releases-who-what-when-where-why

Edited by David Pimborough

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