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Sally

Help with fungi

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Can anyone help me identify the fungi in these photos?

 

These appear to  start off round and then break open to form a flower shape

 fungi-on-grass-lawn-east-lothian-scotlan

 

And a trail through the wood

trail-of-fungus-in-forest-floor-in-woodl

 

 

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Similar to Earthstar fungus but I am fairly sure it is not that as it does not have the collar.

 

The brown bit in the middle appears to be the spore sac. Witness what looks like a hole in one of them where the spores were released.

 

Sorry can't be more definitive.

 

Allan

 

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I'd say they are possibly Lepiota's but as to which specific type I couldn't say.

 

 

 

Here's a handy site to try and assist in identification

 

https://www.first-nature.com/fungi/~id-guide.php

 

and specifically Lepiota's

https://www.first-nature.com/fungi/~agaricaceae.php

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On 25/10/2019 at 16:47, Allan Bell said:

 

Similar to Earthstar fungus but I am fairly sure it is not that as it does not have the collar.

 

The brown bit in the middle appears to be the spore sac. Witness what looks like a hole in one of them where the spores were released.

 

Sorry can't be more definitive.

 

Allan

 

 

10 hours ago, David Pimborough said:

I'd say they are possibly Lepiota's but as to which specific type I couldn't say.

 

 

 

Here's a handy site to try and assist in identification

 

https://www.first-nature.com/fungi/~id-guide.php

 

and specifically Lepiota's

https://www.first-nature.com/fungi/~agaricaceae.php

Thanks both,  not easy to identify these, but I will do some more research. 

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On 26/10/2019 at 09:50, David Pimborough said:

I'd say they are possibly Lepiota's but as to which specific type I couldn't say.

 

 

 

Here's a handy site to try and assist in identification

 

https://www.first-nature.com/fungi/~id-guide.php

 

and specifically Lepiota's

https://www.first-nature.com/fungi/~agaricaceae.php

A friend and fungi buff has also suggested that the first are Lepiota so that will do.

 

He says the second image looks like The Clouded Agaric, Clitocybe nebularis.

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More help with fungi. I think these may be wood blewit. Can anyone confirmed suggest alternative please?
Thanks

 

purple-fungi-growing-in-the-ground-lamb-

Edited by Sally

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Wood Blewit (Lepista nuda) would be my guess also, especially if they were in woodland. Lepista sordida is similar but smaller, forms clusters, and is usually in more open areas such as roadsides. Cortinarius camphoratus is a possibility, but the cap and cap/stem proportions don't look right. It also has an unpleasant smell, while the Lepista smell sweet. I'd rule out the Russulas as they usually have white stems: the closest would be Russula sardonia, but again it doesn't look right and isn't really dark enough. That's all I can come up with.

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On 30/11/2019 at 22:19, DJ Myford said:

Wood Blewit (Lepista nuda) would be my guess also, especially if they were in woodland. Lepista sordida is similar but smaller, forms clusters, and is usually in more open areas such as roadsides. Cortinarius camphoratus is a possibility, but the cap and cap/stem proportions don't look right. It also has an unpleasant smell, while the Lepista smell sweet. I'd rule out the Russulas as they usually have white stems: the closest would be Russula sardonia, but again it doesn't look right and isn't really dark enough. That's all I can come up with.

Thank you indeed.  It was actually on open grassy ground on the top of Lamb Island out in the Firth of Forth. It seemed an unlikely place for fungi.

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