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Chromatic Aberration with Canon EF-s 15/85 on 60D

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I've just returned from QC's naughty step after a fail for CA. On checking a number of my images which were ready to submit, I have found some CA on quite a lot. It is not too obvious, not as bad as Alamy's example, but I am now a little paranoid about it. I used the lens without (noticeable) problems on my Canon 40D, so perhaps upgrading from 10mp to 18mp on my 60D made the problem more obvious. Has anyone else had a problem with these lens / camera combinations? My attempts to eliminate the problem with DPP software don't seem to be very successful, so I need to find a solution, or I'll be risking naughty step with every submission.

Paul

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Have you loaded the lens profile for the 15-85 into DPP? I recently acquired an 18-135 STM lens and find it to be acceptably sharp but at 18mm there can be horrendous lateral CA/purple fringing in the corners, especially around backlit foliage. The CA correction controls in Apple Aperture do not deal with it effectively. However, in DPP using the Digital Lens Optimizer with the correct lens profile gets rid of almost all of it.

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I don't know about DPP but from Lightroom 4 /  ACR 7 onwards, Adobe worked some incredible magic trick with CR removal. Just tick a box and it removes all CA for all practical purposes with the Nikon cameras and lenses I've been using.

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I agree with MDM. I use LR5 with Nikon and Sony NEX cameras and there's a box we can check that says "remove chromatic aberration." So far it's never failed. 

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I've just returned from QC's naughty step after a fail for CA. On checking a number of my images which were ready to submit, I have found some CA on quite a lot. It is not too obvious, not as bad as Alamy's example, but I am now a little paranoid about it. I used the lens without (noticeable) problems on my Canon 40D, so perhaps upgrading from 10mp to 18mp on my 60D made the problem more obvious. Has anyone else had a problem with these lens / camera combinations? My attempts to eliminate the problem with DPP software don't seem to be very successful, so I need to find a solution, or I'll be risking naughty step with every submission.

Paul

I use the same 15-85 EF-S lens on a Canon 550D and did have an early failure for CA.For a while I used PTLens plugin with Photoshop to manually fix images for CA and, although effective, it was tedious. Then I swapped to LR4 which does it automatically. I also tend to downsize to 2400 x 3600. I've had no QC problems with CA since in over 100 submissions.

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"Automatically" if you click the box in LR, no?

 

Ed 

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I occasionally had CA with my Canon 40D and 17-40 / 28-135 lens, but its very easy to remove in Lightroom. Images fixed this way have passed Alamy QC.

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I've just returned from QC's naughty step after a fail for CA. On checking a number of my images which were ready to submit, I have found some CA on quite a lot. It is not too obvious, not as bad as Alamy's example, but I am now a little paranoid about it. I used the lens without (noticeable) problems on my Canon 40D, so perhaps upgrading from 10mp to 18mp on my 60D made the problem more obvious. Has anyone else had a problem with these lens / camera combinations? My attempts to eliminate the problem with DPP software don't seem to be very successful, so I need to find a solution, or I'll be risking naughty step with every submission.

Paul

I use the same 15-85 EF-S lens on a Canon 550D and did have an early failure for CA.For a while I used PTLens plugin with Photoshop to manually fix images for CA and, although effective, it was tedious. Then I swapped to LR4 which does it automatically. I also tend to downsize to 2400 x 3600. I've had no QC problems with CA since in over 100 submissions.

 

I had wondered about downsizing, but then why did I buy the 60D. Seems like I will have to look into buying Lightroom, so if Alamy could arrange a few sales..........    Thanks for all the responses and suggestions, much appreciated.

Paul

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There's a free trial period for Lightroom. If you download it from Adobe you can check out what it does. Ed is right, you do have to tick the "Remove chromatic aberration" box in Color tab of the Lens Corrections menu. It's also worth ticking "Enable Profile Corrections" on the Profile tab of the Lens Correction menu to automatically correct lens distortion and vignetting. These settings can be stored in a Preset and applied automatically if you want (along with a whole pile of other adjustment possibilities). Recommend you work in RAW for best results. I find downsizing helps reduce the possibility of SoLD.

Edited by M.Chapman
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For some reason on LR4, CA disappears as soon as you click "Remove Chromatic Aberrations" on Canon lenses. However, in my experience with third party lenses like SIgma, Tokina and Tamron, you need to physically move the purple and green sliders to apply the effect. Do not dial in too much or you'll have a nasty thick grey border where the fringing occurred. 

 

DPP does a fantastic job of removing CA, however, only works on canon lenses

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I agree with MDM. I use LR5 with Nikon and Sony NEX cameras and there's a box we can check that says "remove chromatic aberration." So far it's never failed. 

This is true for Canon cameras released in the last year or two. It removes CA but only in jpeg mode. The 5DIII was the first to include this.

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I've just discovered RawTherapee seems to do a pretty good job of automatically removing CA, and it's free. Seems to do a pretty good job on extracting the maximum amount of detail too. There's a tick box on the CA section of the RAW tab.

Edited by M.Chapman

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I am working with a Canon full frame 5D Mark-II and a EF24-105mm "L" lens  and have the same problem.

Not sure why, but I can correct it partly with Photoshop CS-5, it's an ongoing battle.

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I am working with a Canon full frame 5D Mark-II and a EF24-105mm "L" lens and have the same problem.

Not sure why, but I can correct it partly with Photoshop CS-5, it's an ongoing battle.

I know this combination very well.

 

You should definitely use the latest version of Canons DPP (Digital Photo Professional) - update the lens in the software - and just tick the box removing CA.

Edited by Niels Quist
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I just bought issue 140 of Digital Photographer purely for a free version, not the most recent, of DxO Optics Pro 6. Figured that for £5 it had to be worth a try and it may help you. It's early days but the results seem similar to processing in ACR (can't remember if I used 5 or 6 but probably 5).

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Hi

I've had the same problems with chromatic aberration. I passed QC with my last camera, the Canon 350D; but since upgrading to the Canon 600D nearly all my images have failed in the last 12 months since using it and I,m seriously considering going back to the 350D except for the fact I now like the big display screen.

 

I've been using it with the same Canon EFS 17-85mm lens so I don't know if this has any bearing on it or not as it has had a couple of lens error messages on it the last couple of times. I would be grateful for any advice or is this just a fault with that model or the RAW processing software.

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All the Canon lenses I've ever owned suffered from CA. But as stated above, it's very simple to remove with a single click. I use Lightroom and before I discovered lens profiles I adjusted the CA manually (which is a pain because it varies according to focal length and from lens to lens). But with lens profiling activated a single click not only removes CA without any manual adjustment necessary, but it also corrects other aberrations such as pin-cushion distortion, vignetting etc.

 

Alan

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All the Canon lenses I've ever owned suffered from CA. But as stated above, it's very simple to remove with a single click. I use Lightroom and before I discovered lens profiles I adjusted the CA manually (which is a pain because it varies according to focal length and from lens to lens). But with lens profiling activated a single click not only removes CA without any manual adjustment necessary, but it also corrects other aberrations such as pin-cushion distortion, vignetting etc.

 

Alan

In fact you don't need to have the lens profiling activated to use the Remove CA feature (in LR4 in any case). It works anyway even if there is no profile for your lens or you don't use it. It is a real bit of magic from Adobe.

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Deleted.

Edited by Inchiquin

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All the Canon lenses I've ever owned suffered from CA. But as stated above, it's very simple to remove with a single click. I use Lightroom and before I discovered lens profiles I adjusted the CA manually (which is a pain because it varies according to focal length and from lens to lens). But with lens profiling activated a single click not only removes CA without any manual adjustment necessary, but it also corrects other aberrations such as pin-cushion distortion, vignetting etc.

 

In fact you don't need to have the lens profiling activated to use the Remove CA feature (in LR4 in any case). It works anyway even if there is no profile for your lens or you don't use it. It is a real bit of magic from Adobe.

Ah, I only have LR3.

 

Alan

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Ah, I only have LR3.

Alan

 

You might just be missing out then. Adobe updated the raw converter with LR4  / ACR 7 and it is genuinely a significant improvement on what went before. I'm no Adobe evangelist by the way. I've stayed with LR4 rather than go to 5 as I don't really see much obvious improvement but maybe I'm missing out on something??

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