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Hi All

I am about to to take the big step and replace my old (2003) Windows XP computer with an iMac. I wanted to avoid the iMac screen because I had read that its very bright, very reflective and hard to calibrate. I had pretty much settled on the 21.5" iMac with the Asus PB278Q as a monitor. A bit of interweb searching showed me a few forum posts that said that external monitors do not work well on the thunderbolt iMac. My questions, then are

 

1. Will the Asus PB278Q work via the thunderbolt port. My instinct says that it will and that the people who had troubles were trying an older monitor on a new Mac, but can anyone confirm this?

 

2. How do you get on with the 27" iMac screen? Does anyone use it for photo work? Photo work is pretty much all I use my computer for - I don't play games, use it for streaming video (if you could see our broadband speed here in rural Quebec you would see why). Are the three complaints against the iMac screen (too bright, too shiny and hard to calibrate) real issues? If the iMac screen is good I could just get the 27" iMac and not bother with the second monitor.

 

3. If I do decide to go down the 21.5" iMac + 27" monitor route, how is the Asus? Does anyone have any experience with it? What others can you recommend? It has to be 27" or more and I have a maximum of one thousand dollars to spend.

 

Looking forward to some learned replies

 

Cheers

 

Col

 

 

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If you have doubts about the iMac screen then why not consider a Mac Mini? 

 

Better yet, go into an Apple Store and try both iMacs and a Mac Mini. I felt the Apple 27 inch monitor was a bit too large for my personal taste and preferred the size of the 21 inch iMac. I'm currently using an LG display with my Mac Mini via the HDMI port. Getting a Mac to work with an Asus should just be a matter of getting the right cable though you may not have all the features you'd get with an Apple Display.

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Hi All

I am about to to take the big step and replace my old (2003) Windows XP computer with an iMac. I wanted to avoid the iMac screen because I had read that its very bright, very reflective and hard to calibrate. I had pretty much settled on the 21.5" iMac with the Asus PB278Q as a monitor. A bit of interweb searching showed me a few forum posts that said that external monitors do not work well on the thunderbolt iMac. My questions, then are

 

1. Will the Asus PB278Q work via the thunderbolt port. My instinct says that it will and that the people who had troubles were trying an older monitor on a new Mac, but can anyone confirm this?

 

2. How do you get on with the 27" iMac screen? Does anyone use it for photo work? Photo work is pretty much all I use my computer for - I don't play games, use it for streaming video (if you could see our broadband speed here in rural Quebec you would see why). Are the three complaints against the iMac screen (too bright, too shiny and hard to calibrate) real issues? If the iMac screen is good I could just get the 27" iMac and not bother with the second monitor.

 

3. If I do decide to go down the 21.5" iMac + 27" monitor route, how is the Asus? Does anyone have any experience with it? What others can you recommend? It has to be 27" or more and I have a maximum of one thousand dollars to spend.

 

Looking forward to some learned replies

 

Cheers

 

Col

 

 

Can't comment on 1&3 but I can say for sure that I've had no problems using / calibrating my iMac screens using X-Rite i1 Pro. Prints always match what I see on the screen. I work in a room with a north facing window and the screen is facing away from it so I have no issues with reflections. On really bright days, I tend to close the curtains if I need optimum conditions.

 

My Macbook Air screen on the other hand is not easily calibrated but I don't use it for processing shots etc.... just keywording and editing collections etc.

 

edit..... or, you could wait around for one of these bad boys :-) The future Mac Pro

Edited by Duncan_Andison
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I find the iMac 27" screen a great asset for images and I like the flexibility of being able to view several apps at one time when keywording, checking provenance etc.

 

I previously had a smaller screen but was less happy about it for the above reasons.

 

Go into an Apple store and check out the screen. You can of course adjust the brightness but you will need to check it out for your preferences. If you are worried about reflection you could always get a hood.

 

dov

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I have an imac 27 and have never calibrated it as it does not need it, so straight out of the box.

I do a lot of printing via photobox and without any profiles or calibration my prints come back exactly as I send them.

 

Andy

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Can't comment on 1&3 but I can say for sure that I've had no problems using / calibrating my iMac screens using X-Rite i1 Pro. Prints always match what I see on the screen. I work in a room with a north facing window and the screen is facing away from it so I have no issues with reflections. On really bright days, I tend to close the curtains if I need optimum conditions.

 

 

Hi Duncan

 

Is your iMac newer version? I am looking for a calibrator. Spyder or X Rite, I am not sure...

 

 

Sorry, Colin. I am not trying to hijack your topic.

 

Sung

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I've just this second gone from a 30 inch Apple Cinema Display to the 27 inch iMac. The other way round really. The 27 inch iMac size is the way to go for photography I would suggest. Not wholly important but if you can go to 27 then I would probably get that.

 

And incredibly quiet with a Fusion Drive.

Edited by Gervais Montacute
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Can't comment on 1&3 but I can say for sure that I've had no problems using / calibrating my iMac screens using X-Rite i1 Pro. Prints always match what I see on the screen. I work in a room with a north facing window and the screen is facing away from it so I have no issues with reflections. On really bright days, I tend to close the curtains if I need optimum conditions.

 

Hi Duncan

 

Is your iMac newer version? I am looking for a calibrator. Spyder or X Rite, I am not sure...

 

 

Sorry, Colin. I am not trying to hijack your topic.

 

Sung

 

I have a 2007 & a 2012 iMac and I the X-Rite works on both, produces quite consistent results..... just not on the 2012 MacBook Air  :angry: but I still wouldn't be without it  :D

 

I've never used the Spyder but I have heard good reports on them! 

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27 inch iMac pretty well out-of-the box OK. Do turn the brightens down a bit. Extra RAM from Crucial a bargain. Real world tests like sending test images to friends on Windows PCs and willing clients cheaper and simpler than calibrating. And they look fine on Alamy. Time machine simple enough, but second back-up system best plan. 

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edit..... or, you could wait around for one of these bad boys :-) The future Mac Pro

 

That's what I'm doing, at least to see what price they are going to be. Still doesn't solve the monitor question though.

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I have the newer version of the 27" iMac and can say that the reflection from the screen is dramatically improved over the older 2011 24" version that I previously ran. Apple claim that the reflective glare is reduced by some 70% and I agree. I still have the original Mac and comparing them side by side the improvements are to be seen to be believed. As for calibration, I use the Spyder Pro v4 and find this very accurate. My prints match my screen perfectly. The screen set at 100% is bright for sure but simply set the brightness to a comfortable level (75% in my case) and calibrate from here.

 

Hope this helps

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I have a 2011 iMac and haven't had to adjust the monitor.  I usually have the brightness at 50%, which is fine.  The main drawback is the reflective glass.  However if they've reduced the glare in the new model, it's probably a lot better.

 

I bought the 21.5 inch, thinking it would be plenty big, as it was larger than my previous one.  But if you have the room, I recommend the 27in.  There are times when I'm working in photoshop when I could use more space.   

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edit..... or, you could wait around for one of these bad boys :-) The future Mac Pro

 

That's what I'm doing, at least to see what price they are going to be. Still doesn't solve the monitor question though.

 

I think when I need to replace my iMac, I will also need to take a long and close look at them. The amount of fire power they have they should last a long time. Previous versions though started out at about 2k I think

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edit..... or, you could wait around for one of these bad boys :-) The future Mac Pro

 

That's what I'm doing, at least to see what price they are going to be. Still doesn't solve the monitor question though.

 

I think when I need to replace my iMac, I will also need to take a long and close look at them. The amount of fire power they have they should last a long time. Previous versions though started out at about 2k I think

 

Yeah my 2008 model is still going strong. The main advantage of the MacPro over the iMac is upgradeability. I've replaced the graphics card twice in this one and added three hard drives. I was delighted when I saw that Apple were going to continue the range as it wasn't clear for a while there. The potential price is worrying though as there is no point in going for the most basic model. Lots of RAM and a big graphics card required at the minimum. It may be I go for an iMac if they are too pricy but they certainly look intriguing,

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edit..... or, you could wait around for one of these bad boys :-) The future Mac Pro

 

That's what I'm doing, at least to see what price they are going to be. Still doesn't solve the monitor question though.

 

I think when I need to replace my iMac, I will also need to take a long and close look at them. The amount of fire power they have they should last a long time. Previous versions though started out at about 2k I think

Yeah my 2008 model is still going strong. The main advantage of the MacPro over the iMac is upgradeability. I've replaced the graphics card twice in this one and added three hard drives. I was delighted when I saw that Apple were going to continue the range as it wasn't clear for a while there. The potential price is worrying though as there is no point in going for the most basic model. Lots of RAM and a big graphics card required at the minimum. It may be I go for an iMac if they are too pricy but they certainly look intriguing,

 

Upgrading the iMacs is fairly straightforward. The hard drive failed on the 2007 one and I took it to bits and replaced it.... no problem. Things like the cd/dvd drive, heat sink and chip etc are all easily accessible and can be replaced. Suction cups to remove the front screen and from there, work your way through the various torque screws etc. In fact, I photographed the insides and uploaded them here  :D

 

Also found this site for parts

Edited by Duncan_Andison
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edit..... or, you could wait around for one of these bad boys :-) The future Mac Pro

 

That's what I'm doing, at least to see what price they are going to be. Still doesn't solve the monitor question though.

 

I think when I need to replace my iMac, I will also need to take a long and close look at them. The amount of fire power they have they should last a long time. Previous versions though started out at about 2k I think

Yeah my 2008 model is still going strong. The main advantage of the MacPro over the iMac is upgradeability. I've replaced the graphics card twice in this one and added three hard drives. I was delighted when I saw that Apple were going to continue the range as it wasn't clear for a while there. The potential price is worrying though as there is no point in going for the most basic model. Lots of RAM and a big graphics card required at the minimum. It may be I go for an iMac if they are too pricy but they certainly look intriguing,

Upgrading the iMacs is fairly straightforward. The hard drive failed on the 2007 one and I took it to bits and replaced it.... no problem. Things like the cd/dvd drive, heat sink and chip etc are all easily accessible and can be replaced. Suction cups to remove the front screen and from there, work your way through the various torque screws etc. In fact, I photographed the insides and uploaded them here  :D

 

Also found this site for parts

 

 

Interesting although you would probably void the warranty doing that. I've replaced the hard drive in my son's MacBook Pro a few times so would probably give what you say a go if necessary. The MacPro though is designed for easy easy upgrading. Unclip the back cover (no screws), the hard drives just slot in (up to 4) as does the RAM. The only thing I ever found fiddly was the second graphics card which used two slots and my handling was a bit clunky but I got it in the end.

 

Sorry Colin for (temporarily) hijacking the thread.

 

EDIT: Oh yeah there is a great company http://www.macupgrades.co.uk near Cambridge for Mac parts of all kinds.

Edited by MDM
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