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geogphotos

Are Alamy stock photographers all ages?

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I get the impression that our community here on the forum is a little long in the tooth.🙂

 

I have suggested doing stock to my children - all three are quite arty -  and they just laugh at the idea of all the hard work, the low fees, and the essential 'squareness' of it. They will happily share pics on social media and seem to spend half their time taking photos on their devices.

 

Are we an ageing bunch - are youngsters arriving on the scene or not bothering?

 

I'm 63

Edited by geogphotos
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I'm a loner by nature. In my professional days I would schmooze with clients and collaborate with art directors and food stylists. It was all very convivial. However, my most favorite thing about stock is that all the schmoozing is behind me now and I can happily wait for a bug or a cloud to crawl into just the right spot to take the photo. The fact that the remuneration is often barely enough for coffee these days is my least favorite.

 

As for knees, it's a problem, one of them in particular. I usually hike with a monopod, ostensibly as an aid to photography but also as a fairly well disguised cane, a big help in getting up from a squatting position. keeping my balance, etc.

Edited by DDoug

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My first camera was a Brownie - an old one that my globe-trotting grandmother gave me when I was 6. I've always loved photography, took a couple of classes in high school and college in the 1970's and even at ICP in the 1980's when I was a trial lawyer in Manhattan (all darkroom - I took pottery when I was in law school - I always needed an art outlet). I wanted to go to RISDI (Rhode Island School of Design) but my parents were not about to pay for a "frivolous" art degree so I did photography (and some painting and pottery) as hobbies.

 

In my 40's I started freelance writing and took photos to go along with the images. At age 50, I learned about stock photography, took Photoshop at a local community college, and joined Alamy. I'll be 61 in a little over a week. The knees are okay but my back was wrecked in a car accident over a decade ago, doctor told me to give up photography before I'd barely started. I didn't. Love my mirrorless cameras (though I miss my Nikons sometimes). Heading off to the acupuncturist. He keeps me young.

 

My daughter sends photos of my grandson taken on her iPhone pretty much daily. I'd rather she do that than shoot stock. 😎I love that I can take iPhone photos of him 800 miles away when we facetime. It may not be DSLR quality, but those pix sure make me smile.

 

I can be very social, even outgoing at times, though deep down I'm a shy person who developed those skills from necessity. I need my alone time and love getting lost on the internet when I'm researching for keywords or lost in the woods shooting photos. I love research, photography and writing. If I could do the job faster and it paid better, it would be my dream job - but it's close. Sometimes I like shooting assignments and making my clients happy but weddings would be way too stressful - the pressure to get it perfect - I'd rather get up in front of a jury LOL. 

 

I guess we have found our tribe here. 

Edited by Marianne
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Photography has always been a solitary pursuit for me. I see it as a form of contemplation. Even stock-shooting can have its Zen-like moments.

 

And, yes, I'm a bit of a loner too.

 

We could start a "loners club", but no one would probably show up to the meetings. 😐

Edited by John Mitchell
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I can sympathise with the knees problem.  I'm OK while the weather stays warm but come the cooler months...

 

Having said that the biggest problem seems to be gravity.  It sucks me down and then I can't get up again.  The ground may be a natural habitat of a plant and insect photographer but we still need to move from location to location.  Hard to do on all fours.    

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I'm 66 and 3/4s, which sounds old, but I don't feel old!

 

Most bits are still working OK, so not too much problem bending down etc. 

 

I too like my own company, although I get on with people, even been married twice and now in a relationship for the last 16 years with a lovely lady.

 

Photography is a very absorbing occupation and I get carried away and don't notice the time!

 

John.

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Well, we seem to have come to a consensus: we're a bunch of miserable old buggers who prefer to be on our own...

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I'm 52 or so I'm told. Not a very talented photographer, I just shoot what interests me. The fact that images can be uploaded to stock agency gives some justification to my street photography. There may not be much demand for images of torn stickers on electrical cabinets, but not much competition either.

 

I work well under pressure, but photography is a hobby. I once photographed a wedding (before the digital age) and I never want to do that again. Relatives expect me to shoot christenings, birthdays and such. That's what I would do anyway, so no pressure there. Having the camera on my face just saves me from the small talk.

Edited by JaniMarkus Hasa
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I remember one vacation to the U.S. west coast, a rambling car trip. Follow your nose, my favorite kind of vacation. My husband pulled into a parking area on the coast of Oregon. I grabbed my camera, and instead of standing elbow-to-elbow with him taking the same photos, same viewpoint, I spied a trail running along the cliff and away I dashed.

When I finally wandered back to our conversion van, hubby was mad. After all, we were on vacation together.  He preferred “joined at the hip”. I was desperate to be on my own. So this is how the trip went! 😁 He was mad, I was glad! (After all, I had to grab some alone time, didn’t I?)

He had a professional camera long before I did, a Russian camera, maybe called Konica? Later Pentax. (I had a film point & shoot until 2004) but he never grasped composition on his own.  If he put the viewfinder to his eye, well then, he took the shot. More often than not, when I looked through the viewfinder, I lowered my camera without taking the shot, and maneuvered until the composition was just right.  I did try to teach him composition on that trip and he achieved more keepers, but since it didn’t come natural, he struggled with landscapes.

This was before I got into stock, but I guess I was a stock shooter in training before I realized it.

Betty

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6 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

Russian camera, maybe called Konica

 

Russian camera Not Konica. Sorry Betty. Konica, I had one, film camera, ages ago.

 

Allan

 

Je's just looked at the statement above. Terrible English.

 

ITMA

 

Edited by Allan Bell

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Well, I'm just a week off my 65th Birthday so I'm one of the old guys! I do contribute to Stockimo too though! 

Edited by John Gaffen

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7 hours ago, John Morrison said:

Well, we seem to have come to a consensus: we're a bunch of miserable old buggers who prefer to be on our own...

 

Don't forget that the forum is a very small sampling. There are 1000's of Alamy contributors, most of whom we've artfully managed to scare away. 😎

 

 

 

 

Edited by John Mitchell
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3 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Russian camera Not Konica. Sorry Betty. Konica, I had one, film camera, ages ago.

 

Allan

 

Je's just looked at the statement above. Terrible English.

 

ITMA

 

 

Konica was a Japanese company that made both cameras and film. They merged with Minolta in 2003 to become Konica Minolta. Sony eventually bought Minolta and inherited their camera technology. The first Sony DSLR's were based on Minolta designs, and the first Sony lenses for DSLR's were really rebranded Minoltas.

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I am sort of a hybrid of many of you.  I am a "people person" but do love being alone at my home office, I keep myself pretty occupied.  But my assignment work is 90% people shoots and I like that.  I do love interacting with people I don't know and meeting people of all walks of life....from the famous and wealthy to the average "Joe".  I think my success with people photography has been putting anyone at ease (or at least most people)...the more cantankerous, the more of a challenge...a little be like lion taming.  Another thing that helps, in an odd way, is that I HATE being photographed so get the people, who I need to photograph, who feel the same way.   I try to make a sometimes difficult process as painless as possible.  I feel like a traveling dentist at times.  Once shoots are over, I love to retreat to my humble home and not answer the phone or door!  Photo editing is my therapy!

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11 hours ago, John Morrison said:

Well, we seem to have come to a consensus: we're a bunch of miserable old buggers who prefer to be on our own...

 

It sounds like another 20 - 30 years and Steve F,  chrismid259 and myself might almost have the Alamy Marketplace to ourselves.. we'll make a fortune when we're the only contributors left! 😁

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3 hours ago, Michael Ventura said:

I am sort of a hybrid of many of you.  I am a "people person" but do love being alone at my home office, I keep myself pretty occupied.  But my assignment work is 90% people shoots and I like that.  I do love interacting with people I don't know and meeting people of all walks of life....from the famous and wealthy to the average "Joe".  I think my success with people photography has been putting anyone at ease (or at least most people)...the more cantankerous, the more of a challenge...a little be like lion taming.  Another thing that helps, in an odd way, is that I HATE being photographed so get the people, who I need to photograph, who feel the same way.   I try to make a sometimes difficult process as painless as possible.  I feel like a traveling dentist at times.  Once shoots are over, I love to retreat to my humble home and not answer the phone or door!  Photo editing is my therapy!

 

Your ability to work well with people shows in your images, Michael. It's a gift. In my other "retirement" job, I tutor high school students, so I'm also interacting with people regularly. I guess that makes me a bit of a part-time hybrid. Having my picture taken is anathema to me as well, but this works in the opposite way for me -- i.e. I'm not very good at putting subjects at ease. I could never have been a portrait photographer.

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13 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Russian camera Not Konica. Sorry Betty. Konica, I had one, film camera, ages ago.

 

Allan

 

Je's just looked at the statement above. Terrible English.

 

ITMA

 

I need to look in storage and see if that old camera is still there, whatever it’s name. It was entirely manual, and it was Russian. I thought it started with a K but may be wrong. I Googled Russian cameras and none of those names seemed familiar. It definitely wasn’t a Minolta hybrid. I remember when he got it, it was so offbrand I’d never heard of it, and it was probably half the price of Nikon, Canons, etc. I do think, though, that he gave it away when he got the Pentax film camera.

He took bad pictures with it. Cloudy, washed out. Or overexposed. He did better with the Pentax, which I believe I still have. I need to list some things on eBay.

Betty

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If you were a little boy in the 60'S you'll remember this.

 

corgi-james-bond-aston-martin-db5-car-BF

Edited by Mr Standfast
typo

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6 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

I need to look in storage and see if that old camera is still there, whatever it’s name. It was entirely manual, and it was Russian. I thought it started with a K but may be wrong. I Googled Russian cameras and none of those names seemed familiar. It definitely wasn’t a Minolta hybrid. I remember when he got it, it was so offbrand I’d never heard of it, and it was probably half the price of Nikon, Canons, etc. I do think, though, that he gave it away when he got the Pentax film camera.

He took bad pictures with it. Cloudy, washed out. Or overexposed. He did better with the Pentax, which I believe I still have. I need to list some things on eBay.

Betty

 

Could it have been a Kiev? That is Russian.

 

Allan

 

 

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So far in my life I've been all ages from 1 minutes (and crying) to 61 and a bit, still crying but that's down to my football team more than anything else.

 

So that covers a lot of ages:)

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On 18/09/2019 at 13:49, Mr Standfast said:

Wonder what ALAMY are thinking?

 

Was thinking same :) 

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16 hours ago, Matt Ashmore said:

 

It sounds like another 20 - 30 years and Steve F,  chrismid259 and myself might almost have the Alamy Marketplace to ourselves.. we'll make a fortune when we're the only contributors left! 😁

 

Cheeky !

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5 hours ago, Mr Standfast said:

If you were a little boy in the 60'S you'll remember this.

 

corgi-james-bond-aston-martin-db5-car-BF

 

I had a Cindy car like that - but in red, and without all the paraphernalia - loved it. Though I never wanted a sports car in real life. 

Edited by BidC

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On 17/09/2019 at 19:05, John Mitchell said:

Photography has always been a solitary pursuit for me. I see it as a form of contemplation. Even stock-shooting can have its Zen-like moments.

 

And, yes, I'm a bit of a loner too.

 

We could start a "loners club", but no one would probably show up to the meetings. 😐

Yes i am a bit of a loner too,i always go taking photos on my own,if someone else was with me i might miss that all important shot especially if they were not into photography like me!

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