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Are Alamy stock photographers all ages?


geogphotos

Question

I get the impression that our community here on the forum is a little long in the tooth.🙂

 

I have suggested doing stock to my children - all three are quite arty -  and they just laugh at the idea of all the hard work, the low fees, and the essential 'squareness' of it. They will happily share pics on social media and seem to spend half their time taking photos on their devices.

 

Are we an ageing bunch - are youngsters arriving on the scene or not bothering?

 

I'm 63

Edited by geogphotos
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I'm 51 and a 1/4.

But at times I think I'm something else, like when making old man noises when getting up out the chair.

 

Taking photos since less than 10 years old. Being with a stock library since age 36.

 

 

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I suspect that Alamy's sister Iphone upload library might have a younger demographic. We're not allowed to discuss it here apparently but those that have mentioned it in passing seem to be doing well. New members to this forum often have technical questions about pixels, dpi, file sizes etc. - none of that matters over there, you just need an Iphone 4 or later.

 

Then there is also the 'Beautiful Free Images & Pictures" so-called community 'sharing' website and its ilk, I'm certainly not going to mention them by name but they may have more immediate appeal to those growing up in the social networking age.

Edited by Harry Harrison
typo
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Just for some variety, I'm 38, been doing stock since I was 34. I don't know if that makes me a youngster, my definition of "young" and "old" keeps changing as I get older!

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Been interested in photography since I was about 4 years old. Was taken into a darkroom to see the process and watched a black and white print develop in the tray. Magical.

 

Course in those days photography was an expensive pastime and at 4 years old I did not have the wherewithal to be able to carry on with the hobby but it must have always been in the back of my mind.

 

Photography was a part of my life from around 17 years old but with some very long breaks. I finally returned to it in the digital era when I joined Alamy back in November 2008 at the age of 63 years.

 

YUP! I am 74 and still learning.

 

Allan

 

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I’m 53. I did O Level photography at school and have loved it ever since. My daughter is doing GCSE photography and has spent the afternoon preparing “contact sheets”. . She looked blank when I explained how negatives (wot?) used to come into CONTACT with the photographic paper. Her teacher might not even remember that.

 

Started on stock 6 years ago failed and gave up. Restarted when Alamy relaxed on which cameras were acceptable. I work full tine, this is just a hobby, and when I get a sale (1 or 2 a month) it feels like a small lottery win 😄.

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6 hours ago, Harry Harrison said:

I suspect that Alamy's sister Iphone upload library might have a younger demographic. We're not allowed to discuss it here apparently but those that have mentioned it in passing seem to be doing well. New members to this forum often have technical questions about pixels, dpi, file sizes etc. - none of that matters over there, you just need an Iphone 4 or later.

 

Then there is also the 'Beautiful Free Images & Pictures" so-called community 'sharing' website and its ilk, I'm certainly not going to mention them by name but they may have more immediate appeal to those growing up in the social networking age.

 

Why should we not discuss Stockimo here? It’s another arm of Alamy isnt it?

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19 minutes ago, ACC said:

Why should we not discuss Stockimo here?

OK, probably dates from this in July 2016:

 

https://discussion.alamy.com/topic/6076-new-rule-posts-about-stockimo/?tab=comments#comment-101514

 

Edited by Harry Harrison
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LXX  (it looks more official in Roman numerals)

 

I bought my first SLR in 1968 while I was a university student. I did mostly b&w back then.

 

I do have some formal training in photography, but I've forgotten most of it at this point. 😏

 

 

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A youthful mid-70's here. (My wife recently got a birthday card from my sister. Outside of card: "We're not getting older, we're getting better."  Inside of card: "Now you say it to me."  They both have August birthdays.)

 

I also got my first SLR in 1968, from the PX catalog while in Vietnam (along with stereo system and all the other stuff everybody got). But didn't get into stock until about 2000, anticipating retirement from the paying job.

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4 hours ago, ACC said:

I’m 53. I did O Level photography at school and have loved it ever since. My daughter is doing GCSE photography and has spent the afternoon preparing “contact sheets”. . She looked blank when I explained how negatives (wot?) used to come into CONTACT with the photographic paper. Her teacher might not even remember that.

 

I still do invigilating at the school where I used to work full-time. GCSE and A Level Photography are now exams in Photoshop - the kids hardly go near a camera. It's all rather depressing.

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Learned some basic darkroom skills from my father around 1960 but didn't really take up photography till the 80's.  Sold a few photos over the years - mostly to accompany articles I'd written.  Got tired of nurserymen, garden centres and others ripping off images from my blog so started submitting to Alamy in Jan 2014.  Enjoying some success now I've reached 69.  Should have started with stock a lot earlier 😊

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I like the idea of encouraging the kids to do something which will provide them with something which generates an income, but as you imply, Ian the effort/reward ratio isn't going to appeal. Not sure it will improve soon either. Better off pushing them towards an extra exam, basic carpentry or an organic allotment, but thats just my POV.

 

Any way who listens to their parents? First camera melted on the Parcel Shelf of Dad's Morris 1100, yes he did say don't leave it there.

 

So this Grandad is saying g'night!

 

 

Edited by Mr Standfast
Morris not austin
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I’m not long in the tooth. I had them filed down recently.

I’ve been serious about photography for 15 years. Before that, I took pictures of family and as a source for my watercolors. 

None of my family is interested in stock. My married daughter enters photos at the count fair, but I don’t think she’s up for the work involved in stock. She’s more interested in instant gratification and we all know we don’t get that in this business, don’t we?

 

And if you think I’m telling my age....don’t hold your breath or I’ll be attending your funeral. 

Let’s just say I’ve been around since God made dirt.

Betty

 

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20 hours ago, geogphotos said:

I get the impression that our community here on the forum is a little long in the tooth.🙂

 

I have suggested doing stock to my children - all three are quite arty -  and they just laugh at the idea of all the hard work, the low fees, and the essential 'squareness' of it. They will happily share pics on social media and seem to spend half their time taking photos on their devices.

 

Are we an ageing bunch - are youngsters arriving on the scene or not bothering?

 

I'm 63

 

Maybe so, but a bit like Betty, my teeth havent grown ;)  - I know of photographers who have this same feeling for stock. If you are young and the world still seems to be your oyster, I guess I can understand (in a way) that you'd rather be buzzing with the rest of your contemporaries.

 

I've always been of the mind that it is both absorbing and fulfilling to slow down and be creative, and also to have different income sources. 

 

I had a job I loved, and in that regard work doesn't become a slog. Same with photography (imv).

I guess our world view is different as we weren't heavily influenced by TV (and social media) whilst young.

 

It's a complex issue !

You could write a thesi on the topic  if truth be told :) 

 

Had a camera on and off all my life, but started submitting to stock in 2016, though more seriously since late last year.

 

 

 

Edited by BidC
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I started on the road to stock in 1977 when I submitted a few pics to Barnabys Picture Library. At the time I was only a hobbyist so wasn't really taking it seriously, but after joining J Allan Cash in 1980 I quickly learned that stock was not about pretty or arty pictures but about useful pictures. At the time I was living in Germany so I was able to supply them with a steady stream of contemporary images from Europe. I stayed with them until they went out of business around 2000. I was put off joining Alamy for a long time because of all the letters in the BFP newsletter saying how difficult it was to pass QC. Now I kick myself for not having cashed in when the going was good!

 

Alan

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11 hours ago, Phil Robinson said:

I still do invigilating at the school where I used to work full-time. GCSE and A Level Photography are now exams in Photoshop - the kids hardly go near a camera. It's all rather depressing.

 

I’d like to give the class a 24 shot 35mm film and say “right, you’ve got to make that last a week and you have to get them processed at Boots. All creativity done in the camera. No post-production tinkering allowed. Oh, and you’ll have to wait two weeks to see what you’ve got”. 

 

OK, i’m a dinosaur.

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26 minutes ago, ACC said:

 

I’d like to give the class a 24 shot 35mm film and say “right, you’ve got to make that last a week and you have to get them processed at Boots. All creativity done in the camera. No post-production tinkering allowed. Oh, and you’ll have to wait two weeks to see what you’ve got”. 

 

OK, i’m a dinosaur.

 

Not a dinosaur at all - I believe this was roughly the rule on David Hurn's Magnum course at Newport - 36 exposures and a 50mm lens only to shoot a story. Way to go, I think, but then I'm 69 (started with a Pentax K1000 in 1972)

 

Alex

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I'm 75. It would be great to have one of those younger, springier bodies to traipse around in but coming of age in the mid-sixties was a kick in the pants and I'd hate to have missed it. Maybe it's because of that that every time I hear the name of the iPhone picture site we aren't supposed to mention, Iko Iko starts running through my head. (Talk-in' 'bout, hey now hey now I-ko, I-ko, un-day, Jock-a-mo fee-no ai na-né, jock-a-mo fee na-né)

Edited by DDoug
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Another septuagenarian at 74! Started photography in the early 1950's when I ran around with my Kodak Brownie 127 and have been obsessed ever since. After a reasonably successful career in the oil industry I took early retirement at age 52 and worked my way into my own small photography business which is something I always wanted to do. Stock eventually became a part of it and I just caught the tail end of good prices when I joined Alamy in 2005. Have achieved some 'letters' and have managed LRPS, CPAGB, BPE3 and AFIAP with the last two being the result of entering National and International Salons which I still enjoy. Retirement on the business side may be looming again!!

Jim :)

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