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Bryan

September 2019 Favourite Uploads

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One of my favourite places, my allotment

 

man-picking-runner-beans-on-an-allotment

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Slowly uploading my images from Japan.

These are from a Summer Festival in a shrine in Osaka:

 

crowd-at-the-natsu-matsuri-summer-festif

 

 

a-miko-is-performing-a-traditional-dance

 

 

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I like this shot of a Comma butterfly as it was my favorite out of five, and also the best focus on the eye.

 

 comma-butterfly-uk-feeding-on-a-sedum-flower-polygonia-c-album-with-its-tongue-probing-flowers-WGDEPH.jpg

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3 hours ago, John Morrison said:

Banishment...

 

girl-playing-next-to-poster-announcing-an-art-exhibition-of-michaelangelos-work-outside-the-minster-hull-east-yorkshire-england-uk-WBDY3X.jpg

Was that posed? If not, very lucky but well spotted.

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37 minutes ago, Jan Brown said:

Was that posed? If not, very lucky but well spotted.

lucky, or patient. 

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1 minute ago, meanderingemu said:

lucky, or patient. 

 

Patient...

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44 minutes ago, John Morrison said:

 

Patient...

You don't think there was any luck involved in someone coming along, barefoot, and holding their limbs in quite that way? 

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56 minutes ago, Jan Brown said:

You don't think there was any luck involved in someone coming along, barefoot, and holding their limbs in quite that way? 

 

Well... I saw the picture potential, stood my ground, pre-focussed and waited for someone to enter the composition. Luck, patience? Maybe both...

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16 minutes ago, John Morrison said:

 

Well... I saw the picture potential, stood my ground, pre-focussed and waited for someone to enter the composition. Luck, patience? Maybe both...

 

Sounds like photography to me? 

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20 minutes ago, John Morrison said:

 

Well... I saw the picture potential, stood my ground, pre-focussed and waited for someone to enter the composition. Luck, patience? Maybe both...

Of course, it was a good spot and certainly needed patience to wait for the right person to come along and make the image and you absolutely picked the 'decisive moment'. I meant no insult when I suggested there was an element of luck, we all need it from time to time. Some of my best images have only come about because I was lucky, but I was still there and pressing the button at the right moment . . . as you were.

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42 minutes ago, John Morrison said:

 

Well... I saw the picture potential, stood my ground, pre-focussed and waited for someone to enter the composition. Luck, patience? Maybe both...

 

always find interesting how people think street photography is all luck ("very lucky").. I've had spots where i've waited for over an hour until the vision was materialized. great shot.  

Edited by meanderingemu
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On 03/09/2019 at 19:42, meanderingemu said:

 

always find interesting how people think street photography is all luck ("very lucky").. I've had spots where i've waited for over an hour until the vision was materialized. great shot.  

I didn't say it was all luck, please don't twist my words. Presumably it was you who put a red arrow on my last two posts? And for no good reason. Better brace myself for another one, I suppose . . . 

 

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Thanks to some inspiring comments back in July and August from Johnnie5 and Autumn Sky regarding faces in the water I came up with this in vertical and horizontal format.

I stand on the shoulders of giants. Just got to make sure I do not fall off.
 

gautama-buddha-meditating-peace-nirvana-

 

gautama-buddha-meditating-peace-nirvana-

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On 03/09/2019 at 20:01, Jan Brown said:

I didn't say it was all luck, please don't twist my words. Presumably it was you who put a red arrow on my last two posts? And for no good reason. Better brace myself for another one, I suppose . . . 

 

no i didn't.   my issue is no one ever tells Bill he was "very lucky" for his cloud formation or Robert for his wonderful butterfly.  Street photography is an art and this should be recognised in @John Morrison perfect execution and great eye of seeing the potential 

 

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Some very different images taken this week, trying to have a varied portfolio.

 

WJXECM.jpg

 

WJY5XH.jpg

 

WK9WK1.jpg

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On 03/09/2019 at 19:41, John Morrison said:

Banishment...

 

girl-playing-next-to-poster-announcing-an-art-exhibition-of-michaelangelos-work-outside-the-minster-hull-east-yorkshire-england-uk-WBDY3X.jpg

 

Great image, great subject for a "best caption" competition.

DD

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Hard to focus on a moving snake.  😊

 

california-kingsnake-twists-in-the-arms-of-staff-member-from-the-south-texas-botanical-gardens-2019-arts-alive-festival-corpus-christi-texas-usa-WHDTM4.jpg

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On 05/09/2019 at 06:35, meanderingemu said:

 

no i didn't.   my issue is no one ever tells Bill he was "very lucky" for his cloud formation or Robert for his wonderful butterfly.  Street photography is an art and this should be recognised in @John Morrison perfect execution and great eye of seeing the potential 

 

Look, you are still twisting what I said.

Of course his practiced photographer's eye saw the potential and anticipated the moment, and he had the patience to wait for the photo to come together. There was no luck involved there, of course not. As I explained - and as you continue to ignore - there is always luck involved in the right element entering the frame. That is why John waited. He could have waited for ever and the right element just might not ever have come along. The photo is great, but it's great because the person made the right shape, and with vigour, to echo what was happening in the poster. Also, the bare-footedness of the person introduces a quasi-religious tone (IMO, at any rate) which echoes the subject in the painting. Had some random person just wandered past the poster, and John had decided that was good enough and pressed the button, the photo would not have had nearly as much impact. But he waited, and he was lucky enough that a far better subject strode by. Skill and luck combined made that photo, as I'm sure John himself would acknowledge.

I know that street photography is an art, it's an area of photography I pursue myself (away from Alamy) and I've produced some pretty good results, IMO. But I am happy to acknowledge the element of luck that was involved sometimes and am surprised that, on a forum of photographers, such umbrage has been taken at my suggesting that luck ever plays a part.

Until the power of the photographer's mind is such that it can influence people into doing the right thing at the right time in the right place to make our photographs zing, we will have to rely on an element of luck playing its part. Especially in street photography.

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8 hours ago, Jan Brown said:

Look, you are still twisting what I said.

Of course his practiced photographer's eye saw the potential and anticipated the moment, and he had the patience to wait for the photo to come together. There was no luck involved there, of course not. As I explained - and as you continue to ignore - there is always luck involved in the right element entering the frame. That is why John waited. He could have waited for ever and the right element just might not ever have come along. The photo is great, but it's great because the person made the right shape, and with vigour, to echo what was happening in the poster. Also, the bare-footedness of the person introduces a quasi-religious tone (IMO, at any rate) which echoes the subject in the painting. Had some random person just wandered past the poster, and John had decided that was good enough and pressed the button, the photo would not have had nearly as much impact. But he waited, and he was lucky enough that a far better subject strode by. Skill and luck combined made that photo, as I'm sure John himself would acknowledge.

I know that street photography is an art, it's an area of photography I pursue myself (away from Alamy) and I've produced some pretty good results, IMO. But I am happy to acknowledge the element of luck that was involved sometimes and am surprised that, on a forum of photographers, such umbrage has been taken at my suggesting that luck ever plays a part.

Until the power of the photographer's mind is such that it can influence people into doing the right thing at the right time in the right place to make our photographs zing, we will have to rely on an element of luck playing its part. Especially in street photography.

 

 

the element of luck is the same in all photography.  There is as much luck in getting nice cloud formation, getting a bird in flight, getting a butterfly to stop at the wight spot and for long enough, yet you decided that John was "Very Lucky" no twisting whatsoever.  There was no luck in John seen the potential of the image.  Yes the resulting story might not have been what he expected up front, but that's the magic of the story telling in street photography, but you need the vision first, but in your eyes either "Was that posed? If not, very lucky..."   and i will continue to disagree with your perception, to me the vision is way before luck, and it is something i hope to be able to reach one day.   

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London, England, UK. September 6th, 2019. Signing event of Sir Paul McCartney's book Hey Grandude! at Waterstones in London. Fans waiting in line from 9am for the 4pm event . Credit: jf pelletier/Alamy Live News Stock Photo

 

this is my favourite so far, mainly because i saw a line up for a book signing as i'm going through London today, and took the shot, reading the book title, but not the author until I sat down a few minutes later and used my friend Google.  (this i agree is Luck! 😉)

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28 minutes ago, meanderingemu said:

 

 

the element of luck is the same in all photography.  There is as much luck in getting nice cloud formation, getting a bird in flight, getting a butterfly to stop at the wight spot and for long enough, yet you decided that John was "Very Lucky" no twisting whatsoever.  There was no luck in John seen the potential of the image.  Yes the resulting story might not have been what he expected up front, but that's the magic of the story telling in street photography, but you need the vision first, but in your eyes either "Was that posed? If not, very lucky..."   and i will continue to disagree with your perception, to me the vision is way before luck, and it is something i hope to be able to reach one day.   

You're so determined to disagree with me that you've actually contradicted what you said earlier about the importance of luck. However, I am not going to repeat myself and, as John himself has nothing to say about this, I will leave it there. Just a shame that my cogent argument about what is, to me, an interesting topic has not resulted in a lively debate, just childish red arrows, injured silence and dogged contradiction.

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14 minutes ago, Jan Brown said:

You're so determined to disagree with me that you've actually contradicted what you said earlier about the importance of luck. However, I am not going to repeat myself and, as John himself has nothing to say about this, I will leave it there. Just a shame that my cogent argument about what is, to me, an interesting topic has not resulted in a lively debate, just childish red arrows, injured silence and dogged contradiction.

 

“Oh, that was a lucky shot!” is what we say about our own pix, in a fit of humility (or faux-humility). It’s not something I would say about someone else’s images, even if it happened to be true. It would sound resentful. There is an element of luck in most photographic set-ups… but it kinda goes without saying. To paraphrase Jack Nicklaus, “the more I practice, the luckier I get”. And, by the way, not every silence is “injured” (and not every argument is "cogent)...

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9 minutes ago, John Morrison said:

 

“Oh, that was a lucky shot!” is what we say about our own pix, in a fit of humility (or faux-humility). It’s not something I would say about someone else’s images, even if it happened to be true. It would sound resentful. There is an element of luck in most photographic set-ups… but it kinda goes without saying. To paraphrase Jack Nicklaus, “the more I practice, the luckier I get”. And, by the way, not every silence is “injured” (and not every argument is "cogent)...

I don't do faux humility or faux anything else, come to that. I don't do jealous, spiteful or resentful, either, but I sometimes forget that others do.

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Actually, John, I went to some lengths to describe why the photograph worked so well, but you choose to ignore that in favour of being offended by my first comment - in which I also complimented it - and then go on to take a side swipe at me. No pleasing some people, I guess.

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