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You are photographers. If you do not like zoos, then take images like these. Your power is in your camera. Use it

 

grizzly-bear-in-a-cage-in-an-old-fashion

 

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I generally don't have any ethical problems with "zoos" (incl game farms/ranches/refuges/rehabs/etc) - as long as they are clean with the animal's welfare being of the highest priority. Zoos would seem to be a great place for wildlife and nature photography.   It's amusing that some nature photo groups insist on full disclose of whether or not a critters image was taken in the wild or in a zoo/game-farm/controlled environment.   

 

As for zoos - it would be interesting to see data on what percentage of zoo creatures - especially higher order animals - are wild-caught versus captive bred/born and rehab'ers. I would suspect that in recent decades that many of zoo's large critters are captive bred/born.  These will not likely have the necessary learned survival skills to be able to live "wild and free".  Life in the wild can be brutally violent and end quickly without wild born and learned survival skills and even then life may be short.   Many large predator species are zoo residents because they had come into conflict with humans or had injuries that made it improbable for them to survive in the wild.   

 

Animals may understand they are restrained - the result is the fence/enclosure pacing often seen -  but to believe that animals have any concept of "freedom" or "captivity" is a form of anthropomorphism previously mentioned.   They react to their environment.

 

 

 

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On 07/09/2019 at 17:39, Phil said:

Animals may understand they are restrained - the result is the fence/enclosure pacing often seen -  but to believe that animals have any concept of "freedom" or "captivity" is a form of anthropomorphism previously mentioned.   They react to their environment.

 

 

 

 

 

Friend here is involved with natural preservation project.  His group rescued a capuchin monkey.  The monkey made friends with one particular human, but when they took her to the forest where a capuchin troops had been spotted, she moved off into the forest without looking back.   Hard to think she didn't understand that we were not her kind, and that her real life with the other capuchins, not with the man who'd been her friend while she was in rehab.  No lingering, no looking back (I saw the video tape).

 

Edited by MizBrown
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10 hours ago, Phil said:

I generally don't have any ethical problems with "zoos" (incl game farms/ranches/refuges/rehabs/etc) - as long as they are clean with the animal's welfare being of the highest priority. Zoos would seem to be a great place for wildlife and nature photography. It's amusing that some nature photo groups insist on full disclose of whether or not a critters image was taken in the wild or in a zoo/game-farm/controlled environment.   

 

As for zoos - it would be interesting to see data on what percentage of zoo creatures - especially higher order animals - are wild-caught versus captive bred/born and rehab'ers. I would suspect that in recent decades that many of zoo's large critters are captive bred/born.  These will not likely have the necessary learned survival skills to be able to live "wild and free".  Life in the wild can be brutally violent and end quickly without wild born and learned survival skills and even then life may be short.   Many large predator species are zoo residents because they had come into conflict with humans or had injuries that made it improbable for them to survive in the wild.   

 

Animals may understand they are restrained - the result is the fence/enclosure pacing often seen -  but to believe that animals have any concept of "freedom" or "captivity" is a form of anthropomorphism previously mentioned.   They react to their environment.

 

 

 

 

It does seem to be important for photographers who want to make a name for themselves in the wildlife field to be very honest about where images were taken. I remember a big brouhaha when Art Wolfe cloned in a zebra when he wanted an image totally filled with stripes. Even though he had put the information in the caption it seemed to bother some wildlife photographers. I don't think I have hurt my chances for sales by being honest,  by the way. People do sometimes want an image from a zoo.

 

There are huge differences between zoos. If you are in the US and visiting Colorado this place only has animals that were rescued from bad situations. They work to make the keeping of wild animals as pets against the law.     https://www.wildanimalsanctuary.org/visit-us   You are seeing the animals from a distance as they are in huge enclosures. The viewing is from a platform high above them so the angles are not ideal. It's all set up for the benefit of the animals, not us.

 

Paulette

 

 

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4 hours ago, NYCat said:

 

There are huge differences between zoos. If you are in the US and visiting Colorado this place only has animals that were rescued from bad situations. They work to make the keeping of wild animals as pets against the law.     https://www.wildanimalsanctuary.org/visit-us   You are seeing the animals from a distance as they are in huge enclosures. The viewing is from a platform high above them so the angles are not ideal. It's all set up for the benefit of the animals, not us.

 

Paulette

 

 

Indeed - all "zoos" are not the same. 

 

We visited the Grizzly & Wolf Discovery Center in West Yellowstone, Montana last year.  It's just outside the Yellowstone NP west entrance.   A very nice rehab/educational center with the welfare of the animals a center piece.   The visit rewarded me with images I would never be able to obtain otherwise.     

https://www.grizzlydiscoveryctr.org/about/

 

Their animals look to be very well taken care of.  We visited in the morning and the wolves were calling to each other.  Believe me - there is nothing like hearing the sound of wolves howling to each other from close up.

 

 

 

 

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