Jump to content
Jools Elliott

Discoverability: poor vs good vs optimized

Recommended Posts

Afternoon all

 

For once I have some free time between relentless traveling around the place and so I'm taking a closer look at my Alamy imagery.

 

Have any of you noticed a difference in the overall visibility and sales of your work by pushing that green bar all the way up to optimized? I ask as I have about 5500 images that are classed as being poor discoverability.

 

I'm wondering how much use of my time it is going through these and seeing what I can do to push the bar until the end.

 

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The general consensus is to disregard that feature. The most important thing you can do is only use relevant tags. Trying to pad your tag field simply to get in “the green” will cause your images to show up in searches where they shouldn’t, thus hurting your CTR.

 

That said, when I tag, I also use plurals. Someone searching for a single beech tree will often search “beech trees”.  Child, children, person, people, juvenile, infant, baby, babies, 1 year old, 1-2 years old, one year old, and such.  These tags won’t get you into CTR trouble because they are relevant. Also put in approximate ages of adult people,  and distinctions like Caucasian, Hispanic, etc.

What you don’t want to do is list “beech tree” when it isn’t the main focus of the image. What a buyer doesn’t want when searching for a beech tree is a shot of a model-T Ford with a distant shot of a beech tree in the background. 

 

For instance, how many relevant tags can you think up for a rubbish bin? 😊

do always fill out the optional page. Sometimes that’s all it takes to get the green bar if you have 40 relevant tags already. 

Betty

  • Like 3
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way. Of the last 16 images I uploaded that will go on sale tomorrow, only 3 or 4 are optimized. Just at or barely over 40 tags.  Most of the rest have 20 something tags only.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

By the way. Of the last 16 images I uploaded that will go on sale tomorrow, only 3 or 4 are optimized. Just at or barely over 40 tags.  Most of the rest have 20 something tags only.

 

Thanks Betty!

 

I need to properly look at what I have and what I think should be optimized or not. Of course, you never do what someone is likely to be searching for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm happy to say that I do not and will not have a single image in the green. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

The general consensus is to disregard that feature.

 

Of course, we wouldn't need to find a consensus among the contributors if Alamy had clarified the situation. 'Discoverability' would appear to encourage the adding of inappropriate tags, to no apparent purpose, and that can't be right...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right, John.

 

If I had time for pointless fun, I might take up Betty's challenge to come up with 50 tags for a rubbish bin. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From tests I did a year or so ago, it appears to have diddly squat effect on the positioning of images in searches, so as far as I'm concerned it's a complete waste of time to add less relevant keywords just to achieve a green bar.

 

Alan

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Jools Elliott said:

Afternoon all

 

For once I have some free time between relentless traveling around the place and so I'm taking a closer look at my Alamy imagery.

 

Have any of you noticed a difference in the overall visibility and sales of your work by pushing that green bar all the way up to optimized? I ask as I have about 5500 images that are classed as being poor discoverability.

 

I'm wondering how much use of my time it is going through these and seeing what I can do to push the bar until the end.

 

Thanks

 

Hi Jools. I have 58,321 Images with "poor discoverability" and 627 Images with "good or optimized discoverability". It doesn’t appear to make any difference to what is picked up in general sales for me. Not worth worrying too much about methinks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Inchiquin said:

From tests I did a year or so ago, it appears to have diddly squat effect on the positioning of images in searches, so as far as I'm concerned it's a complete waste of time to add less relevant keywords just to achieve a green bar.

 

Alan

 

In fact if Alamy ever get round to doing a another rerank and it uses CTR as one of the factors, it may actually degrade their placement.

 

Isn't it about time Alamy ditched the "discoverability" feature and replaced it with something more useful? Eg. 1 star for entering a caption, another for entering at least one supertag, another for entering at least one tag and then more for entering info about property, people and exclusivity. It could then act as a useful aid to find images where I've forgotten to fill something in. A bit like the old AIM did (with a tick on each panel).

 

Mark

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

By the way. Of the last 16 images I uploaded that will go on sale tomorrow, only 3 or 4 are optimized. Just at or barely over 40 tags.  Most of the rest have 20 something tags only.

 

I find that most of my later images only have 5 to 10 tags. Anything more seems superfluous.

 

Allan

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone!

 

In fact, one useful thing it has done is that it's made me go through what I have and see what needs tightening up in terms of keywording etc. I did find some images that didn't even have a caption so at least one good thing has come of this curiosity.

 

As for green bars, I've been waiting for the usual suspects to come along who I know are well placed to offer insight on this. Very appreciated that as usual a feature has been added but no details offered up by Alamy as to how much difference it makes and that contributors are giving the best feedback.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hello. as a keyworder who has worked with Alamy since 2010 and spent many years interrogating keywords for accurate visual relevance

- requirements for full discoverability include..

keywords 45+  supertags 10.

'optional fields': people / release info / location / date / primary (and secondary) category

captions also now contribute to search.

 

When keywording, it may be helpful to consider both hierarchy and synonyms

a chair for example is also furniture and a seat, seating  - it will also have been made during a time period and be of a certain material

- it could be comfortable, empty, old or new...broken, repaired.. and one of many types (office, rocking, dining, armchair) it could be

in a room, a garden or a studio shot (context), colour may also be important.

 

In English, there are many ways of saying the same thing, if you add relevant alternatives you are adding synonyms.

Where an object sits within a wider grouping, (chairs also being seating and furniture) these 'umbrella terms' are hierarchy.

It is helpful to consider why a person would be looking for your image and ensure those terms are applied with variants.

Also adding plurals for primary objects when they are the main focus of search.

 

Because we don't know how Alamy will use data in future updates, it is advisable to ensure your keywords are relevant

and fulfill as many required fields as possible.

This may also be useful to you as you can download your data and enable search on your own content.

 

There may also be a current 'weighting' on new and refreshed content..

I have noticed sales patterns tend to improve when records are updating ..

while attention to the same collections can fade when input is at a minimum.

 

  • Thanks 2
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree about new content. When other things in my life keep me from uploading regularly, I notice a falloff in sales. When I upload weekly, it seems my images are positioned better and sales pick up.

Betty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

I find that most of my later images only have 5 to 10 tags. Anything more seems superfluous.

 

Allan

 

I'm similar - less is more in my view. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, John Morrison said:

 

Of course, we wouldn't need to find a consensus among the contributors if Alamy had clarified the situation. 'Discoverability' would appear to encourage the adding of inappropriate tags, to no apparent purpose, and that can't be right...

 

John, FYI on your tag or tags that reads "al fresco." 

 

The cross-Atlantic dictionaries have let us down on this one. It means outdoor dining in British English. But in American English, they use "alfresco," one word. Al fresco comes from the Italian, yes, but in Italian, it means "in the cool." They don't use it to mean outdoor dining . . . there are two other phrases for that. 😜

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

+1 on forgetting discoverability. I rarely get beyond 20 or 30 these days unless pasting from past similars- in which case it's a good idea to have room to do it, which you won't if you cram in tags up to the limit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.