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On 10/08/2019 at 12:13, RWatkins said:

I've been using Linux (Ubuntu) for many years. I use Darktable in place of Lightroom but never got used to GIMP so I run PS (CS2) using Wine, which is a software layer that allows Windows software to run natively on a Linux desktop. It's not perfect but it stops me having to pay Microsoft anything.

 

Not to start beating the dead horse again.  But Adobe is seemingly firmly entrenched with their subscription business model for Lightroom/Photoshop.   Then the on-going Microsoft Windows 10 drama with bloatware, updates, and security issues.  Then there's the high initial/replacement/maintenance cost for Apple's closed hardware ecosystem.  Given this.... Linux can be an alternative if in the future it's desired to break away from these systems.    

 

For those that have Linux experience for stock image processing what Linux RAW convertors and image processing/DAM applications fill the Lightroom/Photoshop roles on Linux?    GIMP, darktable, RawTherapee come to mind but there may be others.

 

Which of these or others are being used successfully for processing/managing stock images and portfolios?   Can they truly replace LR/PS or are significantly lacking in certain features/capabilities?

 

I've begun to dabble with darktable and even installed Linux Mint MATE 19.2 on a somewhat derelict laptop as a learning platform.

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Like all raw processing packages, Darktable and RawTherapee need a fair amount of computing power. Make sure you've got the right hardware before you judge. 

 

Test as many of them as you can and see which you like best. All are capable of great results.

 

BTW ... the right answer is almost never "spend thousands of dollars on new computer hardware" but I think you already know that.

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Posted (edited)
On 16/08/2019 at 19:22, Brian Yarvin said:

Like all raw processing packages, Darktable and RawTherapee need a fair amount of computing power. Make sure you've got the right hardware before you judge. 

 

Test as many of them as you can and see which you like best. All are capable of great results.

 

BTW ... the right answer is almost never "spend thousands of dollars on new computer hardware" but I think you already know that.

My Darktable experience was good with a very old (around 10 years) quad core Phenom processor, 8Gb Ram. What made it usable was the addition of a suitable graphics processor that enabled openCL. It was a relatively high end graphics card when it was new (AMD RX480) but was old and used when I bought it so cost me around £70. It was too slow prior to that. Changes to sliders would take ages to update the preview.

 

I've since spent a bit more upgrading to a new motherboard and a Ryzen 2700 which has increased the responsiveness again, but that made less noticeable difference than the graphics card. 

Edited by RWatkins

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