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Hi guys,

 

Just made a sale for $180, but it's not looking quite so good when I looked at the details. Am I reading this correctly? My image can be used for 20 years as a 2-page spread and unlimited, Worldwide print / e-book?

 

Probably missed something...

 

$180

Country: Worldwide
Usage: Editorial
Media: Textbook - print and e-book
Print run: Unlimited
Placement: Inside
Image Size: 2 page spread
Start: 03 October 2013
End: 03 October 2038
All terms and rights granted as per the Alamy Preferred Vendor Agreement dated 26th January 2010 prevail. Flat rate per image, license period 20 years

 

Cheers,

Dayve

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Isn't it 25?

 

Pearl

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WoW, a 20 year licence

Yeah, 2038-2013 = 25

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25 years isn't really something you can do anything about for a publication because we can't expect after 5, 10 or 15 years for them to suddenly rip the picture out of the book as if it didn't exist. Also isnt anything after 25 years free of copyright? 

 

It's the price I'd be pee'd off at. Wish we got these preferred rights when hiring gear. "Yes you can use this lens for 25 years, it'll only cost you $180, but you'll sell millions using it" 

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Just made a sale for $180, but it's not looking quite so good when I looked at the details.

 

 

I have stopped looking at the license details,  i figure a few $$$ and ignoring the details is better than high blood pressure and a heart attack,  after all said and done, we cannot wind back the sale and dictate the licensing terms.

 

Cheers,

 

Paul.

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This has been answered after hot debates by management on the old Forum. Ask member services.

 

wim

 

(who thinks the content of the old forum should have been kept alive)

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Also isnt anything after 25 years free of copyright?

Good lord no. 70 years after the death of the author, usually.

25 years isn't even back to the start of my career! I'd be horrified if everything I had published before 1988 was free-for-all!

You need to have a good look at the CDPA.

Edited by spacecadet

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25 years isn't really something you can do anything about for a publication because we can't expect after 5, 10 or 15 years for them to suddenly rip the picture out of the book as if it didn't exist. Also isnt anything after 25 years free of copyright?

 

It's the price I'd be pee'd off at. Wish we got these preferred rights when hiring gear. "Yes you can use this lens for 25 years, it'll only cost you $180, but you'll sell millions using it" 

 

Well out.

 

"The term of protection in the UK for an original literary, dramatic, musical or artistic work lasts for the life of the author plus 70 years from the end of the year in which they die. "

 

http://www.ipo.gov.uk/c-essential.pdf

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This has been answered after hot debates by management on the old Forum. Ask member services.

 

wim

 

(who thinks the content of the old forum should have been kept alive)

 

Wim: this link to the old forum content was published on a previous thread (it also includes all the content from this forum).  Whether this will remain online remains to be seen...

 

Have fun browsing!

  • Upvote 2

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Two of those $180 textbook sales popped up for me today. These types of sales used to be more common, so I was glad to see them back whatever the licensing period. As pointed out above, the 25-year duration probably doesn't mean very much in the long run.

Edited by John Mitchell

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This has been answered after hot debates by management on the old Forum. Ask member services.

 

wim

 

(who thinks the content of the old forum should have been kept alive)

 

Wim: this link to the old forum content was published on a previous thread (it also includes all the content from this forum).  Whether this will remain online remains to be seen...

 

Have fun browsing!

 

Wow how did I miss that?

Great! Thank you!

 

After an initial error message I am even able to do a search.

 

Haven't found the message though.

 

wim

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Paulstw, on 07 Oct 2013 - 09:30, said:

25 years isn't really something you can do anything about for a publication because we can't expect after 5, 10 or 15 years for them to suddenly rip the picture out of the book as if it didn't exist. Also isnt anything after 25 years free of copyright?

 

It's the price I'd be pee'd off at. Wish we got these preferred rights when hiring gear. "Yes you can use this lens for 25 years, it'll only cost you $180, but you'll sell millions using it"

WRONG.

 

How long does a copyright last?

 

The term of copyright for a particular work depends on several factors, including whether it has been published, and, if so, the date of first publication. As a general rule, for works created after January 1, 1978, copyright protection lasts for the life of the author plus an additional 70 years. For an anonymous work, a pseudonymous work, or a work made for hire, the copyright endures for a term of 95 years from the year of its first publication or a term of 120 years from the year of its creation, whichever expires first. For works first published prior to 1978, the term will vary depending on several factors. To determine the length of copyright protection for a particular work, consult chapter 3 of the Copyright Act (title 17 of the United States Code). More information on the term of copyright can be found in Circular 15a, Duration of Copyright, and Circular 1, Copyright Basics.

 

I hate miss information.

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Guys I was asking the question if 25 years was the length of time for copyright, it wasn't me stating a fact.

Edited by Paulstw

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Aw, Paul, you just edited and ruined my fun - had to delete image (and scrap post) now :( !

Edited by losdemas

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Paulstw, on 07 Oct 2013 - 09:30, said:

25 years isn't really something you can do anything about for a publication because we can't expect after 5, 10 or 15 years for them to suddenly rip the picture out of the book as if it didn't exist. Also isnt anything after 25 years free of copyright?

 

It's the price I'd be pee'd off at. Wish we got these preferred rights when hiring gear. "Yes you can use this lens for 25 years, it'll only cost you $180, but you'll sell millions using it"

WRONG.

 

How long does a copyright last?

 

The term of copyright for a particular work depends on several factors, including whether it has been published, and, if so, the date of first publication. As a general rule, for works created after January 1, 1978, copyright protection lasts for the life of the author plus an additional 70 years. For an anonymous work, a pseudonymous work, or a work made for hire, the copyright endures for a term of 95 years from the year of its first publication or a term of 120 years from the year of its creation, whichever expires first. For works first published prior to 1978, the term will vary depending on several factors. To determine the length of copyright protection for a particular work, consult chapter 3 of the Copyright Act (title 17 of the United States Code). More information on the term of copyright can be found in Circular 15a, Duration of Copyright, and Circular 1, Copyright Basics.

 

I hate miss information.

Chuck, the OP is in the UK. That's why he needs to look at our 1988 Act as amended. The basic term for new works is the same, it has to be under the Berne conventions, is the same but, although it's not likely to apply to many here, the treatment of older works is quite different and we also have Crown copyright.

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Usually these terms are for one edition of the book. When they update the contents of the book and issue a new edition they re-license the image. I get re-licensing requests all the time from  textbook companies I've licensed to directly for previous editions. One is every two years and the original license was for $1,800 (they're using the image in multiple places in the book) and every two years they send me a request to use the image again, tell me how much the print-run has gone up, if they've expanded it to more countries and I issue them an invoice. Latest one was about a yearago and that invoice was for just under $3k.

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Hi guys,

 

Just made a sale for $180, but it's not looking quite so good when I looked at the details. Am I reading this correctly? My image can be used for 20 years as a 2-page spread and unlimited, Worldwide print / e-book?

 

Probably missed something...

 

$180

Country: Worldwide

Usage: Editorial

Media: Textbook - print and e-book

Print run: Unlimited

Placement: Inside

Image Size: 2 page spread

Start: 03 October 2013

End: 03 October 2038

All terms and rights granted as per the Alamy Preferred Vendor Agreement dated 26th January 2010 prevail. Flat rate per image, license period 20 years

 

Cheers,

Dayve

As a consolation I have had exactly the same sale details from early 2011 for $180. That image has sold with the same details 3 times up to now for the same price. I believe it is a geography textbook, possibly this one: http://www.learningace.com/doc/7729613/2c18fcdfbe1b0c5e7b741cd2317ac3df/photo-credits

 

Andy

  • Upvote 1

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Andy,

 

that is a very useful search page for photo credits!

 

wim

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Although hard work to trawle through there are a lot of Alamy credits on there.


Andy,

 

that is a very useful search page for photo credits!

 

wim

Andy

Edited by AndyMelbourne

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