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Marb

Selling prints in a cafe gallery

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3 hours ago, aphperspective said:

people like to see a signature so I've been told.

Yes they do. When I started to sell to the public I thought that signing them was an affectation. Almost every buyer wanted me to sign them and I had to take the frame apart to sign. Now I do it automatically. 

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27 minutes ago, Colin Woods said:

Yes they do. When I started to sell to the public I thought that signing them was an affectation. Almost every buyer wanted me to sign them and I had to take the frame apart to sign. Now I do it automatically. 

Interesting. I wasn't going to do that on account of not being a well known but might try a cheeky signature now 

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19 hours ago, Inchiquin said:

Like I said, it's all down to location. If the café is in London you'll get far more than if it's in a downtrodden post-industrial town in West Yorkshire which is where I live. I do however have an excellent local printer who will do A3 prints for £5. Before my Epson 1800 gave up the ghost I was printing them myself for about £3.

 

Alan

Alan,

 

Still have my old 1800 sitting in the basement, been using a Canon Pro-100 and have been really happy with it.  With the Canon I can hit it on the first pass

the Epson 1800 was not that easy...... 

 

Chuck

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Posted (edited)

I think looking at all prices considered that Ikea give better value with frame size and mounts included. Not glass but the buyer can buy their own frame if needed. They do a black ph neutral window mounted frame 50 x 70cm for £14. I will Just make sure I get it printed on quality paper to justify the price. 

 

Do you sign the print on the back or the window mount ?

Edited by Marb

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1 hour ago, Marb said:

Do you sign the print on the back or the window mount ?

 

I always sign and write the title of the picture on the window mount. I use a pencil so it can't smudge and won't fade.

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20 hours ago, Colin Woods said:

 

I always sign and write the title of the picture on the window mount. I use a pencil so it can't smudge and won't fade.

 

I think It’s best to sign on the print, front or back. The mount can always be removed or replaced and the signature is lost!

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On 02/04/2019 at 14:52, Colin Woods said:

 

Absolutely. A few years back I was asked to put some photos for sale in a local restaurant. I went the whole hog ("totus porcus" as Jackie Fisher would say) and put them in good frames. The bigger ones (printed at 24 x 16 inches) were in big frames with a wide mat. The title cards I did in Photoshop, with the name of the image and the description typed out in a bold font, all printed on a faded version (photoshop opacity of about 30%) of the described image. I thought that it would be a good practice for me and if a sold a few I would be happy. They sold well, and fast. Even the big ones, which I priced at $400 each, went in the first week. People still respond to a well taken and well printed image. Don't undervalue yourself. You could also print some cards as people will often take a card rather than nothing. Pricing depends on your area as Alan says, but I would say avoid the "bargain bin" look. I think we are all suffering from bargain bin prices in photography. If you choose nice quality frames yourself then they become a part of the artwork and people will keep them. I also have found, through selling to the public quite a bit, that the most appropriate frame and mat for photos are a simple black frame with a black mat. I think you are better to produce fewer well mounted images than a whole heap of clip framed ones. Take your time, get it right and people will respond.

I agree with you about quality framing. I was at the R.A. Summer Exhibition a 5 or 6 years ago and I bought my partner a print by a famous artist illustrator. Framed it would have been £180 more. The frame was the cheapest pine frame I have ever seen. Utter con I thought. I decided to find a good framers and match the frame to a significant colour in the print. Some think it is part of the value of the print to have the original artist's frame. The picture would have annoyed me seeing an utter con for the frame. Anyhow, I love the print and more so because we chose a quality frame together. 

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