Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hello everyone,

I'm new to Alamy, last year was my first year contributing here (but I've been contributing to other microstock sites for a while) so I'm not familiar with how Alamy reports taxes for the US residents. Can anyone help me figure it out? I can't find a link to anything on the website that resembles a tax center like other microstock sites have, where I can download my 1099. Do they get mailed to you? If yes, have you gotten yours yet? It's getting late in the tax season and I'm concerned that I haven't gotten mine yet.

Thanks in advance,

Svetlana

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

We don't get a 1099. I just add it up and give the sum to my accountant. I have other self-employment income as well as pension, etc. Alamy is just one source of photography income. Are your other sites in the US with taxes withheld?

 

Paulette

Edited by NYCat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Surely you know Alamy is a British company? It doesn't have any responsibility to the IRS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all, Yes, I do know that they are a British company. But the US regulations are quite strict and the IRS requires transparency from businesses who work with American residents. It's a burden but most companies comply with it. My french bank has to report my account to the IRS... So I was under the assumption that Alamy would do the same. 

All the other sites I work with report my earnings on a 1099 which I then use for my taxes. Sounds like I'll just have to do the math. But now I know and that's what I needed.

Thanks everyone! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been with Alamy many years and I don't ever recall receiving anything from them to document my proceeds.  I just add up the monthly deposits made to my account and note it on my Schedule C, where I report business income and expenses.  If the IRS were ever to ask for documentation I would show them the deposits on my monthly bank statements, but that has never happened.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's certainly no equivalent to that form in the UK outside the construction industry. If I pay a contractor, I have no obligation to tell the Revenue that I've done so on a separate form. I just get a receipt and it goes in the accounts in the usual way. As to earnings, I add them up myself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm an American citizen who is a legal resident in Nicaragua.  I pay self-employment taxes on income earned in the US over $400 or $500 a year (and those generally do send me tax forms).  So far, I haven't enough from photography to pay self-employment tax on it, but I believe that foreign earned money while I'm a resident of another country is exempt up to some five figure amount.

 

The US tends to want taxes from all its citizens, though.  My earnings from Alamy don't go into a US bank, but into my Nicaraguan dollar savings account.  The Nicaraguan bank is required to report activity on. my account.  We've had an interesting go-around on where I am legally a resident (the US wants me to give them a US address, which I don't have).

 

Anyone else in the same situation?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Svetlana,

 

I've been self employed since 1980 and from 1989 to 1996 I lived and worked outside of the country (U.S.)

I never dealt with 1099's, except for U.S. Companies.  I just total my income from each source and do my

taxes.  With Alamy it is easy to do I.E. Payments to XXXXX contributor.

 

MBrown,

 

When I lived in Europe, I was exempt from the first $75,000 income and I did maintain a U.S. Bank account.

For U.S. Taxes there is a restriction on the amount of time you spend in the U.S. and I was always below that.

My largest problem was working for my French agent, their tax system is a mess for Americans.

 

Chuck 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like the other U.S. citizens, I just add up my deposits from Alamy and give that figure to my accountant, along with other miscellaneous income and 1099’s.  Alamy does not send out 1099’s.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 05/03/2019 at 15:31, Chuck Nacke said:

MBrown,

 

When I lived in Europe, I was exempt from the first $75,000 income and I did maintain a U.S. Bank account.

For U.S. Taxes there is a restriction on the amount of time you spend in the U.S. and I was always below that.

My largest problem was working for my French agent, their tax system is a mess for Americans.

 

Chuck 

 

Thanks.  That matches what I thought was the foreign income max.  These days, if we have more than $10K in a foreign account, we owe the IRS some additional forms.

 

I think the max time in the US before tax liabilities as a resident kick in is a month in any given year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MB,

 

I had always been lead to believe that if you spent less than 30 days during a calendar year, don't quote me on that it was a long time ago,

Americans were exempt from income, up to $75,000 earned while working outside of the United States.  I did not think that it mattered who

or where the income was from as long as the person was living and working outside of the U.S.?  The French were a completely different

story and I've always had tax issues with my French agents.

 

FYI, I did live in the Ukraine and Russia for ten years and worked with agents in the U.S., UK, France, Germany, Finland, Spain, Italy and

my favorite Japan, great agency.

 

I would suggest to you and all Alamy contributors get good tax advice and not from the U.S. internal Revenue Service.  At the time my best

friend was a tax attorney.

 

Chuck

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.