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Keywording is so time-consuming and I keep running out of ideas of what to tag photos as. I don't have a question. I'm just complaining. ha!

 

Seriously....it's not that bad, but some days I zone out doing it.

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This is absolutely true, but good keywording is just as important as being able to take and process a good picture. At least you are not making the mistake of trying to fill every one of the fifty available keyword slots and falling into the realms of irrelevancy in doing so. Perseverance and relevance will bring rewards in time.

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You need to get into the mindset that keywording is fun. I quite enjoy the research involved, and trying to get one over the competition by finding more relevant facts that may help flog the photos.

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I hate keywording too. But if I go out to shoot photographs, and take into account the time to get there and back, the time spent walking around, finding the right locations and angles, and the time to process them all afterwards and get them up on Alamy, then keywording is probably the least time-consuming part of the process, especially as many of the pics will share a good number of keywords. And then I can always go back and improve the keywording later, with minimal effort compared to re-shooting, even if that's possible.

 

Alan

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I treat keywording as a necessary job, and if you deal with clusters of similar images then the keywords can simply be copied and pasted in to batches of images via Adobe Bridge, Lightroom or Photoshop

 

It's simple if you use a keywording tool like http://microstockgroup.com/tools/keyword.php

 

It's also amazing how much history and general knowledge you can pick up through keywording

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I'd rather gouge my eyeballs out with a rusty screwdriver and fry them in a pound of lard than keyword images, but it's something which has to be done.  Ugggggh.

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15 hours ago, lisah2006 said:

Keywording is so time-consuming and I keep running out of ideas of what to tag photos as.

Hmmmm, if you don't know what to tag photos as, maybe there isn't a clear subject or concept in the photo, as all you need to do is keyword what's in the photos.

 

Might I humbly suggest that you have some very similar images in your port, and if you were trying to distinguish between them by caption or keywords, you would indeed have problems.

 

If you use a keyword suggestion tool, make sure you carefully go through the suggestions and delete those which are irrelevant to your image. Many people don't do that, so end up with lots of irrelevant keywords. NOT criticising David above, I haven't looked at his keywording. But in many cases when people have irrelevant keywords, they remonstrate, "Oh, but I used X keyword tool" (sadly, without engaging brain).

 

 

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16 hours ago, Bryan said:

You need to get into the mindset that keywording is fun. I quite enjoy the research involved, and trying to get one over the competition by finding more relevant facts that may help flog the photos.

I find it far more interesting keywording things I don't know exactly what they are because I learn stuff and find out things I did not know before.  Like I can now tell the difference between cow parsley and hemlock because of keywording - I never even knew they were similar until I was captioning and keywording photos.

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27 minutes ago, Starsphinx said:

I find it far more interesting keywording things I don't know exactly what they are because I learn stuff and find out things I did not know before. 

Totally agree with that, though I can get quite distracted following links.

Now, if only I could remember what I'd learned!

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18 hours ago, Bryan said:

You need to get into the mindset that keywording is fun. I quite enjoy the research involved, and trying to get one over the competition by finding more relevant facts that may help flog the photos.

 

Me too. I actually enjoy writing more than the basic and finding synonyms or conceptual key words, if needed. Learned a great deal. Also a great way to keep up your foreign language skills.

 

Worst scenario is to have a lot of images you want to be on sale the next day. Needs to be split up into necessary and supplementary work on more days

.

Edited by Niels Quist

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2 hours ago, Starsphinx said:

I find it far more interesting keywording things I don't know exactly what they are because I learn stuff and find out things I did not know before.  Like I can now tell the difference between cow parsley and hemlock because of keywording - I never even knew they were similar until I was captioning and keywording photos.

No kidding!

I shot this rodeo image (RHP461) that had a painted tin container attached to the saddle. As the saying goes, this wasn't my first rodeo but I had no idea what that was.

Google wasn't going to help as I had no starting reference point. So after pondering this over for about 15 minutes, it occurred to me that a lariat would fit nicely inside.

I checked on the internet and found exactly one site that had something like it for sale. It turns out that it's a lariat carry case used by trick rodeo riders back in the 1920's.

 

Native cowboy with a vintage western americana lariat lasso tin carry case in the warm-up arena at the Tsuut'ina Annual Rodeo & Powwow Stock Photo

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Shooting is the fun part. Most everything else is work.

 

OK, there is the occasional enjoyable "Aha" moment while researching for keywords. Unless it takes a long time, like trying to figure out exactly where I was while wandering around the Old City in Jerusalem.

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4 hours ago, Colblimp said:

I'd rather gouge my eyeballs out with a rusty screwdriver and fry them in a pound of lard than keyword images, but it's something which has to be done.  Ugggggh.

 

 

I'm vegetarian but find a strange affinity with this.

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5 hours ago, Colblimp said:

gouge my eyeballs out with a rusty screwdriver and fry them in a pound of lard

Eyeballs, screwdriver, lard, all well represented, but for the phrase tag- "Sorry, we can't find anything for your search term"- Alamy.

Only 24 for "pound of lard" though.

 

Seriously, OP, over time you can copy over a lot of tags for similar images in AIM.

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1 hour ago, Rico said:

No kidding!

I shot this rodeo image (RHP461) that had a painted tin container attached to the saddle. As the saying goes, this wasn't my first rodeo but I had no idea what that was.

Google wasn't going to help as I had no starting reference point. So after pondering this over for about 15 minutes, it occurred to me that a lariat would fit nicely inside.

I checked on the internet and found exactly one site that had something like it for sale. It turns out that it's a lariat carry case used by trick rodeo riders back in the 1920's.

 

Native cowboy with a vintage western americana lariat lasso tin carry case in the warm-up arena at the Tsuut'ina Annual Rodeo & Powwow Stock Photo

Funny, at first glance I thought it was a repurposed 1000 foot magazine for an Arriflex 35BL.

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10 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

Funny, at first glance I thought it was a repurposed 1000 foot magazine for an Arriflex 35BL.

Thanks, you made me check:lol:

Film canisters are a lot thinner

Whew!

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It's not much fun, but AT LEAST as important as taking great photos. You may have taken the best photo in the history of photography, but if nobody finds it, it's not going to sell. 

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6 hours ago, spacecadet said:

Eyeballs, screwdriver, lard, all well represented, but for the phrase tag- "Sorry, we can't find anything for your search term"- Alamy.

Only 24 for "pound of lard" though.

 

Seriously, OP, over time you can copy over a lot of tags for similar images in AIM.

PMSL :lol::lol::lol:

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I agree with the comments on the importance of key wording and describing what's in the image but i also try to think about what a Google Searcher might type in. sometimes querky phrases like "show me the money" or IFRS-15 generate views that I wouldn't otherwise get. In short, my point is that key wording is your sales line to get people to look at your product.

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On 9.2.2019 at 21:30, Joseph Clemson said:

 At least you are not making the mistake of trying to fill every one of the fifty available keyword slots and falling into the realms of irrelevancy in doing so. 

 

That was my mistake during the test-phase at Alamy.

 

I have ~4000 pictures to upload and I thought 50 tags per image will drive me crazy.

 

Edited by orest

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19 hours ago, spacecadet said:

Eyeballs, screwdriver, lard, all well represented, but for the phrase tag- "Sorry, we can't find anything for your search term"- Alamy.

Only 24 for "pound of lard" though.

 

Seriously, OP, over time you can copy over a lot of tags for similar images in AIM.

 

Thanks for the heads up I've photos of lard I'll put it in as a tag :D

 

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