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Jill Morgan

The revolving game of Why Didn't I?

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Over the past couple of days I have been going through my photos of my trip to Toronto.

 

And as I bring every picture up to 100% for QC, I find myself over and over saying "Why didn't I also take a zoomed in shot of that as well as the wide shot?"  Or why didn't I notice that great shot in the background I should have taken as well? jI"m beginning to think I should take my laptop with me as well on shoots so when I go in for a coffee, I can go over the pics at 100% and see if there was anything in there I should have shot and missed.

 

Anyone else suffer from cases of Why Didn't I?

 

Jill

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Oh yeah. Why didn't I shoot wider so that the playing cubs wouldn't have their heads cut off when they stand up!!! I habitually zoom too far in.

 

Paulette

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Missed a good one a while back. Took photo of front of pub with wide wide lens and only when seen at 100% on computer did I notice a lovely missed image of a person sat in the pub behind a clear glass window reading a newspaper with the sun streaming in on him alone.

 

Reminisant of some shots taken by a geezer with an old Leica some years ago.

 

Arrgh!

 

Allan

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Anyone else suffer from cases of Why Didn't I?

 

Jill

Hmmmm....... not really ^_^

I think this is because - especially for landscapes and certainly for mountains - I prefer to use my 70-200/2.8 (even my 400mm) to pick out the interesting bits. Wide angle lenses, I use mainly to show an interesting foreground subject in its environment. But very rarely use a wide angle lens to capture a whole scene. When I want to show the whole landscape in one shot without the interesting bits getting lost, I prefer to make a panoramic shot (when possible) by stitching several 50mm or 70-200mm lens' images.

Developing an eye for those little distant gems will get better in time ;)

 

Cheers,

Philippe

 

Similarly, I use a 50mm for a lot of my landscapes, especially if there are mountains, as using a wideangle often makes mountains look small and wimpy (unless I'm in very close as in a valley or a cliff). The 50mm gives superior image quality to a wideangle. I'm normally using landscape format but I will frequently take an additional sky shot with overlap and stitch later to get a portrait or even a square format. I also prefer to do a panorama with the 50mm rather than use a wideangle. It gives a realistic representation of the scene although a wideangle can provide a more dramatic rendering, especially on skies. I don't use anything longer than a 50mm for landscapes because I am usually at the weight limit of what I want to carry.

 

Of course it means a lot more work post-processing having to stitch images together - that is the downside.

Edited by MDM

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Anyone else suffer from cases of Why Didn't I?

 

I wake up in the morning thinking "I must try to look beyond the scene in front of my eyes when taking photos".

 

And when the camera is at my eye I get so engrossed in the scene I totally forget.

 

Alan

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Why didn't I after every shoot. It is the best way to improve your photography

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